#1
I know the pentatonic scales, basically I just want to know how to relate them to modes and what not
#2
Tell me what you know about pentatonics and what you know about modes, and we'll tell you what you need to know.
#3
I would relate them to the major and minor scales, first.

major pentatonic is the major scale minus the 4th and 7th. So if you add those in to your major pentatonic scale you get the major scale.

minor pentatonic is the (natural) minor scale minus the 2nd and 6th. So add those in and you have the minor.

It's just a matter of adding two extra notes to the scales you already know, in both cases.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
You'd need a pretty firm grasp of modes.

You'd also need a firm understanding of the charactoristic notes of a given and how they are or are not present in a pentatonic shape.

If you have these, then you could superimpose a pentatonic over a modal vamp, but in itself, that is basically subtractive, and not modal. For example, none of the Pentatonics have the b2, so though you could play it over a Phrygian vamp, you're not playing Phrygian at all.

So you would have to see the Pentatonic in the context of modal understanding, and use it for superimposing a different, more simplified melodic texture over it.

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by bobchob
I know the pentatonic scales, basically I just want to know how to relate them to modes and what not

There are seven diatonic modes.
Three of them are major (contain a root, major third, and perfect fifth)
Three of them are minor (contain a root, minor third, and perfect ffith)
The last one is diminished (contains a root, minor third, and diminished fifth).

In a way you can think of the major and minor pentatonic scale as a kind of "skeleton scale" that contains all the common notes of the three major or three minor modes respectively.

Hopefully some visuals will help illustrate this relationship for you.
Here we have our 12 note chromatic scale...


Note that these patterns all start and end on the same note an octave apart. The pattern continues again in either direction. If you wanted to continue upward the 8 would be the 1 and you would follow the pattern from there. (Hopefully that makes sense).

So let's look at these pentatonic relationships...

Major
Here we have the major pentatonic. All the pentatonic notes are blue. Then we show the three major modes (the Major Scale (Ionian Mode), the Lydian Mode, and the Mixolydian Mode). Again the notes of the major pentatonic are in blue. The extra notes that distinguish that mode from the pentatonic are in yellow.




==========================================
Minor
Here we have the minor pentatonic followed by the minor modes.

Again all the pentatonic notes are blue.

Then we show the three minor modes (the Minor Scale (Aeolian Mode), the Phrygian Mode, and the Dorian Mode). Again the notes of the major pentatonic are in blue. The extra notes that distinguish that mode from the pentatonic are in yellow.




==========================================
Diminished
This is an incredibly ugly mode. It is also difficult to use. It really doesn't even deserve it's own category.

The reason that this mode is so awful is the lack of the perfect fifth relationship with the root note.

The root perfect fifth relationship is one of the most fundamental relationships in music. This mode lacks a perfect fifth against the root of the mode. However, there are plenty of perfect fifth relationships with every other note in the mode - which makes the tonic very unstable and consequently it becomes difficult to resolve to that note in a satisfactory manner.

It also doesn't contain the notes of either pentatonic scale. I should have made the notes a different colour actually - like puke green or pooh brown. Anyway here is the Locrian Mode...

==========================================
Diatonic-Pentatonic
There is another relationship between all of the diatonic* modes -Ionian, Phrygian, Dorian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian- and the pentatonic scale.

The notes that are left of the diatonic scale form a pentatonic scale.

This is a less useful relationship than those described above. But I thought I'd put it out there anyway.

This relationship is visually apparent on the piano keyboard. The white notes make up a diatonic scale while the black notes form a pentatonic scale.

*Used here diatonic does not include the harmonic or melodic minor scales. The definition of diatonic here implies only the seven note scales that have five whole tones and two semitones in which the semitones are maximally spaced.
Si
#6
A pentatonic scale is a musical scale or mode with five notes per octave in contrast to a heptatonic (seven note) scale such as the major scale and minor scale. Pentatonic scales are very common and are found all over the world. They are divided into those with semitones (hemitonic) and those without (anhemitonic).
Last edited by richardsnelson at Aug 25, 2014,