#1
Hello guys. I've been struggling with the problems on the title for god knows how long. The guitar is a Les Paul Studio "Faded" by Gibson. I bought it used, but it has no damage on it.

I recently changed the stock pickups with SD Black Winters. The guitar does not read artifical harmonics, neither with the stock pickups nor with Black Winters. The guitar's wiring is not the standard, (even if it is standard for Gibson), it has a circuit board, chips and all that. I wonder if that is the problem. If it is, what can I do, besides changing the whole wiring to the conventional solder/potentiometer system?

About the action and fret buzz, I've adjusted the truss rod, the stoptail bridge and still there is frett buzz, and the guitar sounds very bad as opposed to what should it be, even if it is not a high-end Gibson, it sounds and plays like a $100 guitar. I appreciate if you can help.
Last edited by fyfol95 at Aug 12, 2014,
#2
Pictures would help.

Sounds like it might need a fret level either way. If you've adjusted the truss rod and the bridge properly odds are the frets or neck are messed up.
#3
Pictures of the guitar, or the circuit board? The fret buzz is between the 12th and 19th frets of the low E, if that helps.
#4
Just curious. The circuit board makes me wonder if it's a fake or if it's been messed with. I don't remember if they put boards in the Faded series. Pics of the guitar in full and the board might clear up how original it is.
#5
I can upload 'em tomorrow (it is 2 am here).

Also, as far as I know, Gibson includes PCB's in their newer models, and mine was made in 2011. And if it's messed with, I would like to meet the person who would like to put a circuit board on their guitar
#7
Does it actually have chips? Or is it just a PCB?

2011 would be about right for the PCB connectors but if it's got an actual active circuit in there it's been tampered with.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
That's a funny place to have fret rattles. The neck might be warped the the frets lifted, and a fret level might cure it.


Pretty standard place, actually, particularly on Gibsons.

Two reasons for that; One, Gibson generally cuts its nuts fairly high. When you lower the bridge to lower the action, you end up with (exaggerated, here) a string that's high at the nut, low at the bridge, and fret buzz will usually show up in the upper frets. Two, LPs in particular may have a Gibson Hump -- this is a fairly common fretboard condition where the frets from the 16th fret (where the guitar attaches to the guitar) on up are slightly higher than the rest of the fretboard.

If it's only the Low E that's buzzing, it's also possible that you need to raise that side of the bridge and/or that there's a flyer fret in the upper reaches that needs to be nailed down.

Might be worth having the frets superglued as well: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html

A fret level, nut modification and a fret superglue (not necessarily in that order <G> can make a huge difference in playability.
#9
Hello again. After working on the guitar for the night, I managed to get it on a mediocre level of playing. Fret buzz is minimal andthe guitar sounds like a Les Paul now. However, still pinch harmonics sound like bad effects from 70's movies.

I wonder if that may be caused by the PCB. The guitar did not squeal with the BurstBucker Pro's and still doesn't with black winters.


Anyway, here is the PCB, if you ask for more pictures I will upload.

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The electric bands on the PCB is my creation I'm afraid. Couldn't find the connectors here, so we had to have a "make do" solution. We cut the wires from the BurstBuckers, soldered them with the Black Winters, and taped them. Took about 5 hours to get the job done
#10
It's not the board.
It's not the pickups.
It's not even the hashjob of installation.
#11
Why are you insulting all of a sudden? Everybody knows that the installation is crap, but that was the best solution at the time. Whenever I get the chance, I will rewire. And would you care to say what "it is" then?
#12
Bring it to tech - save yourself the headache. Hopefully it's not a lemon.
#13
Quote by dspellman
Pretty standard place, actually, particularly on Gibsons.

Two reasons for that; One, Gibson generally cuts its nuts fairly high. When you lower the bridge to lower the action, you end up with (exaggerated, here) a string that's high at the nut, low at the bridge, and fret buzz will usually show up in the upper frets. Two, LPs in particular may have a Gibson Hump -- this is a fairly common fretboard condition where the frets from the 16th fret (where the guitar attaches to the guitar) on up are slightly higher than the rest of the fretboard.

If it's only the Low E that's buzzing, it's also possible that you need to raise that side of the bridge and/or that there's a flyer fret in the upper reaches that needs to be nailed down.

Might be worth having the frets superglued as well: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html

A fret level, nut modification and a fret superglue (not necessarily in that order <G> can make a huge difference in playability.


Yeah, I would have expected the Gibson hump cause a problems around the heel frets, and a high nut to show up in the low ones - 2 to 5 frets. Frets 12 to 19 could just be too much neck relief and too low a bridge.
#14
Well according to Dan Erlewine bolt on necks (specifically Fenders) suffer from the hump not Gibsons.
Of the 4 modern Gibson's I've owned (all from model year 2010 & later) they've never needed anything more than a decent setup.
Don't mind Dspellman he has a hate thing for today's Gibsons.
Moving on.....
#15
Got it. As I said, the fret buzz problem is nearly solved, after a good fret level I think it will be gone for good. Thank you all for your help. And do you have any idea as to why a guitar might not produce pinch harmonics? I mean with my other guitar (Schecter Damien Elite), you can hear a little bit of harmonics even when it's unplugged and with rusty strings. Can it be because thicker gauge of the strings (11s), or about that whole "weight relief"/chambering shenanigan?
#16
Quote by KenG
Well according to Dan Erlewine bolt on necks (specifically Fenders) suffer from the hump not Gibsons.

Don't mind Dspellman he has a hate thing for today's Gibsons.


And the last new Gibson he bought, a $4K Axcess Custom, had a bit of a Gibson ....er...Fender? Hump. Easy enough fix on the PLEK in any case.
#17
Quote by KenG
Well according to Dan Erlewine bolt on necks (specifically Fenders) suffer from the hump not Gibsons.
Of the 4 modern Gibson's I've owned (all from model year 2010 & later) they've never needed anything more than a decent setup.
Don't mind Dspellman he has a hate thing for today's Gibsons.


My '80s Burny LP Jr knockoff has a hump around the 15th fret but the '95 Gibson LP Special doesn't, so I'm not going to get into a sectarian war. It isn't problem for me, because I only play slide on electrics, so I don't have the action very low.