#1
I put on these new d'addario strings and I hate them. I need a specific type of string that isn't like what I have now, they are good for bending but terrible for everything else. The problem is most of all that it takes way too much pressure to get the notes clear and it kills my hand trying to play chords clearly. The strings are designed for playing slow solos with tons of distortion but I like playing all styles and need my hand to not die trying to play chords.

So I need a suggestion for my dean VMNT of a specific type of string that makes it easy to play notes clearly and are less prone to fret buzz as it drives me crazy if I hear any buzz at all but I don't want to kill my hand. I don't care what type of genre they are supposedly for (they can be d'addarios'), I need notes to sound clearly that don't take way too much effort. Please give me a link or exact make and model.
Last edited by farcry at Aug 13, 2014,
#2
The string gauge is what you really need to change when it comes to making things easier, and that will change depending on what you're using now, what tuning you're in, and how you like your tension for picking and so on. Strings are all much the same really.

The buzz issue is one of guitar set up as well. Using more tense strings or not hitting the ones you have so hard will help but really, once you've settled on a good gauge then you should do a decent set up on your guitar so the action is right.

So: what string gauges are you using now, and what tuning are you in?
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#3
Standard tuning, 10-42 these strings definitely are not the same as most, the EAD are much looser than most
Last edited by farcry at Aug 13, 2014,
#4
Quote by farcry
Standard tuning, 10-42 these strings definitely are not the same as most, the EAD are much looser than most


10-42 is a weird set of gauges, standard 10-sets are a 10-46, no wonder the low strings are loose. Try at least a 10-46 set, if not a 10-52.
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#5
Quote by farcry
The strings are designed for playing slow solos with tons of distortion but I like playing all styles and need my hand to not die trying to play chords.

Who ever told you that is full of shite

If it is hard to fret notes with 42's it sounds like you need a proper setup
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#6
Yeah, a setup is in order, and a standard 10-46 is where I'd start, it's actually my go to for standard tuning. Really it just requires some experimentation, I tried pretty much every standard set before coming back to 10-46. It would worth it to learn how to set your guitar up as well, no one can setup a guitar to your preferences as precisely as yourself.
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#7
A setup is not needed, the guitar worked great with the previous strings and I was hoping someone would recommend a type that are good for playing a long time with minimal fret buzz, obviously came to the wrong place
#8
We told you what we thought the best advice advice would be. Strings don't cause fret buzz, setups do. Changing strings often means you have to change the setup. Look up what strings they put on the guitar stock, and buy those.

Edit: there isn't a certain TYPE of string that are less prone to buzzing. You seem to have a bit of a misunderstanding about strings in general, instead of being bitter lets just try to figure out how to solve your problem.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
Last edited by dementiacaptain at Aug 13, 2014,
#9
You seem to be uninformed. Certain strings require you to press harder to play and are more prone to fret buzz. Not really debatable. I went to the guitar shop and got some Elixir lights and lo and behold they are easy to play and have significantly less fret buzz and I can play them longer and faster.

The tone isn't quite as warm as others but worth it for the drastically improved playability. The other ones I had were balanced tension d'addarios and they are obviously made for bending and are way harder to play and have way more fret buzz
Last edited by farcry at Aug 13, 2014,
#10
Also if you use the standard tuning, you might wanna go with 10-46s as heavy bottom sets (10-52 and such) are usually preferred by people who use drop D and such. Some good brands for standard 10-46 and 10-52 are Rotosound, Ernie Ball (people like them, I don't) and coated strings like Elixir.

Edit: Elixir Lights are 10-46, and if your neck is adjusted for 10-46 strings a 10-42 may cause buzzing because of the uneven tension. That 10-46 set may have helped that setup problem.
Last edited by fyfol95 at Aug 13, 2014,
#11
Quote by farcry
You seem to be uninformed. Certain strings require you to press harder to play and are more prone to fret buzz. Not really debatable. I went to the guitar shop and got some Elixir lights and lo and behold they are easy to play and have significantly less fret buzz and I can play them longer and faster.

The tone isn't quite as warm as others but worth it for the drastically improved playability. The other ones I had were balanced tension d'addarios and they are obviously made for bending and are way harder to play and have way more fret buzz


Nanoweb lights are a 10-46 set. Different gauges. It has nothing to do with the type of string at all.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#12
Quote by farcry
A setup is not needed, the guitar worked great with the previous strings and I was hoping someone would recommend a type that are good for playing a long time with minimal fret buzz, obviously came to the wrong place

If there's buzzing, do a setup. Don't sit there and blame it on the strings. Even if it is the strings, a setup is probably a good idea.
#13
Quote by farcry
You seem to be uninformed. Certain strings require you to press harder to play and are more prone to fret buzz. Not really debatable. I went to the guitar shop and got some Elixir lights and lo and behold they are easy to play and have significantly less fret buzz and I can play them longer and faster.

The tone isn't quite as warm as others but worth it for the drastically improved playability. The other ones I had were balanced tension d'addarios and they are obviously made for bending and are way harder to play and have way more fret buzz

Actually your misinformed.

Yes when changing from one gauge of strings to another you sometimes need to set your guitar up for those specific strings or you will indeed get fret buzz. This can be just a simple adjustment of the bridge height or simply setting the relief of the neck to what the strings need.

You may notice a difference in playability and tone if you switch from Nickel wound strings to pure nickel or from round-wound to flat-wound. And the lighter the strings, the easier they are on your hands/fingers

But in the end you need to have your guitar set-up for the strings you use to get the optimum result. But what do I know, I'm only guitar tech
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at Aug 13, 2014,
#14
Guitar tech or not reality says otherwise, I didn't need to get it set up. I asked for a brand and model, you guys insisted it wasn't the solution and it was. Whatever rhetorical way you want to spin it isn't going to change the fact that the elixir lights have less fret buzz than the d'addario balanced tensions.
#15
Quote by farcry
Guitar tech or not reality says otherwise, I didn't need to get it set up. I asked for a brand and model, you guys insisted it wasn't the solution and it was. Whatever rhetorical way you want to spin it isn't going to change the fact that the elixir lights have less fret buzz than the d'addario balanced tensions.


Literally the first thing I said was a change of string gauge.

You went from a 10-42 set to a 10-46 set, the problem is solved, and you're saying I'm wrong?

Ok, sure.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#17
Quote by farcry
Guitar tech or not reality says otherwise, I didn't need to get it set up. I asked for a brand and model, you guys insisted it wasn't the solution and it was. Whatever rhetorical way you want to spin it isn't going to change the fact that the elixir lights have less fret buzz than the d'addario balanced tensions.

Obviously your right, that is why your here asking for help. Your as smart as my 16 yr old is.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at Aug 13, 2014,
#18
Don from D'Addario here - we don't make a .010 - .042 set. We make a balanced tension set that is .010-.046. The interior gauges are altered to help with even tension across all six strings. This set is actually designed for highly articulate players. The nuances that this set delivers isn't for everyone, as the gauge changes are quite subtle.

Even when you keep the same gauge but switch brands, you can still require a set up. Some brands will have a different core-to-wrap ratio which can increase or decrease the overall tension on your neck. If the Elixir set applied more tension to you neck, that would pull the strings higher plus the coating on the strings, provides a more slippery feel. Certainly this would help with what you were describing.

You were getting good advice from the other posters on the forum. I also had sent you a private message, asking if I could help but never heard back from you. All the best.

Don
Don Dawson
Marketing Specialist
D'Addario / Planet Waves
Last edited by ddawson2012 at Aug 14, 2014,