#1
When my guitar is in E standard and I then tune down to C# standard, for a while the strings drift UP in tuning (i.e. become sharper or higher-pitched) until they stabilise. When I go the other way the reverse happens.

Anyone know the physics behind this, if it's true?
#2
Quote by Jehannum
When my guitar is in E standard and I then tune down to C# standard, for a while the strings drift UP in tuning (i.e. become sharper or higher-pitched) until they stabilise. When I go the other way the reverse happens.

Anyone know the physics behind this, if it's true?


The neck is made of wood, wood is prone to flexing under tension.
When you go from E to C# you're releasing tension from the neck and you truss rod is pulling the neck back since there is less tension.
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#3
Also, strings stretch out and stretch out different amounts depending on the tension, since C# requires less tension, the string may be retracting a little bit. This problem can be made far more obvious on a guitar with a whammy bar (and alleviated faster with it as well).
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#4
and that's the only reason i dont use a guitar with a whammy bar, far too lazy to deal with that
#5
Quote by olix95
and that's the only reason i dont use a guitar with a whammy bar, far too lazy to deal with that

lolwut?

All good whammy bar systems are designed so this isn't even a concern -- unless you retune like TS did.
#6
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
lolwut?

All good whammy bar systems are designed so this isn't even a concern -- unless you retune like TS did.


I believe that's what he means, switching tunings with a trem sucks ass
#7
Quote by Jehannum
When my guitar is in E standard and I then tune down to C# standard, for a while the strings drift UP in tuning (i.e. become sharper or higher-pitched) until they stabilise. When I go the other way the reverse happens.

Anyone know the physics behind this, if it's true?


You tune the strings quickly. The stress on the guitar reduces. The guitar reacts slowly - an hour or more. The guitar expands (bends backwards) and the tuning goes up.
#8
Quote by Velcro Man
I believe that's what he means, switching tunings with a trem sucks ass

Well, yes...but that's the downside of a trem vs. a hardtail.
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
lolwut?

All good whammy bar systems are designed so this isn't even a concern -- unless you retune like TS did.

I have a bad habit of retuning, plus I have a crap whammy bar system as far as I'm concerned...
#10
Quote by olix95
I have a bad habit of retuning, plus I have a crap whammy bar system as far as I'm concerned...


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