#1
Hey guys, so I got my first tube amp, it's a Bugera Trirec. (Let's not turn this into a Bugera hate fest cause the thing sounds great and hasn't failed on me yet)

In the past i've only used mutli fx pedals, amps with it built in etc so i've just gone and got myself a few nice pedals.

Here is my chain:

Charvel DC-1 > Mark Tremonti Wah > ISP Decimator > Bugera TriRec > Effects loop out > TC Electronic Flashback Delay X4 > Effects look in > 412 cab with V30s.

Everything going in the front end is fine, it sounds great, now i'm having issues with volume drops/increases regarding the fx loop.

Now this amp is basically a copy of a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier, it has a footswitch to turn the FX loop on & off. Now on the back of the amp there is a FX loop send level and an FX loop return level. When I set these to 12 o clock and engage the FX loop, there is a big drop in volume! Not so much of an issue, when i turn these all the way clockwise and engage the FX loop there is no loss in volume, it sounds good.

Now, when I have my delay pedal plugged in, when I engage the FX loop on the board and then engage the delay pedal, the boost in volume is ridiculously high. The "delay level" knob on the pedal does affect the gain, it just affects how much delay you can hear. So with this all the way off/all the way up there is no change in volume.

So, what is causing this? I want to be able to engage my pedal without this massive boost in volume.

http://www.bugera-amps.com/en/products/trirec-infinium.aspx
On the media section on that page you can see a decent image of the back of the amp.

Thanks
#2
Quote by AJScott
I want to be able to engage my pedal without this massive boost in volume.
Lower the fx return volume.
Also if you hear distortion, lower the fx send volume too.

And good luck with the whole amp not failing

Also, just out of curiosity, are there noticeable differences in sound when using different rectifiers?
Name's Luca.

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Last edited by Spambot_2 at Aug 13, 2014,
#3
Experiment with your effects loop gain until it is right. Eff send controls how much gain goes out to your loop. Set that wherever you need to so your effects see a signal that is not clipping and equal to your dry signal. The effects return is a "mix" that controls how much dry guitar/wet effects you get. Different amps have different loop circuit quality and a totally wet effects loop often sounds dull on less expensive amps.

I would start by turning the return mix all the way up and adjust the send to match your dry signal volume. Then adjust the return for your wet mix.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 14, 2014,
#4
Quote by Spambot_2
Lower the fx return volume.
Also if you hear distortion, lower the fx send volume too.

And good luck with the whole amp not failing

Also, just out of curiosity, are there noticeable differences in sound when using different rectifiers?


Cheers, and yes with the rectifiers. I find it most noticeable on the gain channels when using passive pickups. It's only brief but once you hit a chord and cancel it you can feel the "woomf" on the tube rectification. The silicone diode rectification is very tight. Personally I can't hear it aswell on clean channels.