#1
Hi, I am still fairly new to audio engineering but it seems I have been getting the ropes on my DAW and the equipment I am using... (Focusrite iTrack solo, Akai Mpk, studio monitors) I have watched endless youtube videos of pro home studios and I aspire to have one of those myself one day... The thing is there is so much that goes into a studio, I have no idea where to even begin as far as upgrading and getting more quality equipment to make my songs sound better... I'm lost... I don't know where to begin... I don't want to buy the wrong things when other things are needed. I would like some help maybe a book or a website that can teach me how to setup the right signal chains and preamps and so fourth... This is just something I really want to learn and this is my cry for help
#2
What are you recording, what are you producing, what mic's do you have, what monitors do you have, what DAW do you use... ?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Using Logic pro X recording everything from rock to just techno beats... I don't have a mic just yet that would also come in handy but I put guitar direct into the focus rite as of now. Once i get a mic i hope to use that instead of direct in.
#4
Quote by NinjaStrez
Using Logic pro X recording everything from rock to just techno beats... I don't have a mic just yet that would also come in handy but I put guitar direct into the focus rite as of now. Once i get a mic i hope to use that instead of direct in.

Looks like you figured out the first thing to upgrade - your lack of mic!

After that, upgrade as you identify a lack of quality. If you can't identify where to upgrade, then you don't need to upgrade it
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#5
homerecording.com has a ton of info in the user forums - read all the 'sticky' threads there!
My reverbnation page


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#7
But still, what monitors do you have?

'cause I'd much rather go direct and use good sounding amp sims with good monitors than recording my amp with a mic without being able to mix everything properly afterwards.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#8
they aren't even technically monitors... They are Cambridge Soundworks speakers that I use through a digital audio receiver... They do the trick... However, if there is some HUGE difference between those and studio monitors do tell. But they do sound great and I get a real crisp sound out of them... I am sorry for my ignorance xD
#9
My suggestion is not to go out and buy a bunch of gear because you think you might need it. Just record and mix stuff. As a need arises, you will then know what to get. If you ever decide you want to record vocals or acoustic instruments, a good mic would be useful then.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
After you get a mic the next thing to look at would probably be room treatment, after that just upgrade/add as you feel you need/want things.
#11
Sounds like you are getting good advice. I would say just be prepared for a computer upgrade if you haven't done it already. If your computer is older and lacking a good processor and plenty of ram be prepared to upgrade.
May I also recommend that you look into a stand alone recorder like the Tascam 32 Track DP-32. For about $600.00 it is a complete package with no latency issues or processing issues, lots of effects, a CD burner to record your mixes too and tons of other stuff all in one box. Although I have a decent DAW set up with Sonor and a T-Racks mastering suite, I still record a lot of my basic tracks on an Tascam 2488 (24 track). I like being able to just pick it up and go to someone elses place and have them add some vocals or other instruments. I bring the Tascam back, hook it up via USB to my DAW and transfer tracks back into the computer to do final mixes. It's just another option. Don't overlook stand alone recorders if you don't have much to start with in your home recording studio.