#1
In rock music, how do you guys adjust your lead parts for borrowed chords in a sequence. For example a simple I-bIII-IV progression. when the bIII chord comes around there are 2 non-scale tones now in the mix. Is it just a quick adjustment made to move the 3rd and 7th scale tones down a half step? Which i guess would take you from a major scale to blues/myxolydian scale?
#2
I write for the harmony that's there. I don't adjust. If it's major, I'll treat it as major and add addtional notes depending on the sound I want to create. It might be a b7, might be #4, might just be a standard M7, who knows. If you want a mixolydian sound, emphasize the b7, otherwise, don't.
#3
Quote by MapOfYourHead
I write for the harmony that's there. I don't adjust. If it's major, I'll treat it as major and add addtional notes depending on the sound I want to create. It might be a b7, might be #4, might just be a standard M7, who knows. If you want a mixolydian sound, emphasize the b7, otherwise, don't.


when you add those notes, as opposed to adjust, do you play the 7 and the b7…. the 4 and the #4?


Quote by tyle12
In rock music, how do you guys adjust your lead parts for borrowed chords in a sequence. For example a simple I-bIII-IV progression. when the bIII chord comes around there are 2 non-scale tones now in the mix. Is it just a quick adjustment made to move the 3rd and 7th scale tones down a half step? Which i guess would take you from a major scale to blues/myxolydian scale?


For that particular progression Id probably play minor pentatonic or minor blues over the whole thing.

You could also trying using the Major scale, but then use the minor scale for the borrowed chord.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2014,
#4
Quote by GuitarMunky
when you add those notes, as opposed to adjust, do you play the 7 and the b7…. the 4 and the #4?


*Use additional notes

If they are needed
#5
Quote by tyle12
when the bIII chord comes around there are 2 non-scale tones now in the mix.

So, in this case, play chord tones on the bIII.
#6
I'd go for pentatonic/blues or dorian mode action on that particular progression. I mean, the only note that doesn't fall into all three of those is the 3 on your I chord.

If it's getting stale, a major/mixolydian scale would do just fine, but I wouldn't adjust EVERY time the I comes along.

It's more about finding what scale(s)/mode(s) are going to fit your progression the best and picking one or two as a starting point. Use your ear to do the rest and pay attention to target notes.

That'll get you through 99% of rock/blues stuff.

EDIT: totally wrote diatonic instead of dorian. oops
Last edited by mjones1992 at Aug 13, 2014,
#7
as usual..."it depends"

every1 wants to discuss chord symbols in text on a forum. Thats nice but thats leaving out so much information. How many bars of each chord? Whats the voicing on that 1 chord? In other words is that major 3rd going to ring out really prominently?

also, what is the feel of the song?

if the major 3rd isnt really prominent then you could just use minor pentatonic or Dorian for the whole thing. For instance with a distorted guitar playing bar chords, that major 3rd is barely even going to be heard in the mix

if the rhythm gtr is distorted enough or has a certain tone, a "I,bIII,IV" is really going to sound almost exactly like power chords

on the other hand if its a cleaner rhythm guitar or the progression dwells on the 1 chord for several bars then id personally play either A major pentatonic or A mixolydian on the 1 chord and then switch to A minor pent/Dorian on the bIII and emphasize the major 3rd to minor 3rd change there

Also on the 1 chord you can play the minor3rd to maj3rd bluesy feel

Ive played over those type of progressions so much I wouldnt even really have to think much on it. Just play a sort of minor/major bluesy feel and u cant go too wrong
Last edited by JohnProphet at Aug 13, 2014,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
For that particular progression Id probably play minor pentatonic or minor blues over the whole thing.


TS I would start here. It is the most obvious and common way that people would play over this progression.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Quote by tyle12
In rock music, how do you guys adjust your lead parts for borrowed chords in a sequence. For example a simple I-bIII-IV progression. when the bIII chord comes around there are 2 non-scale tones now in the mix. Is it just a quick adjustment made to move the 3rd and 7th scale tones down a half step? Which i guess would take you from a major scale to blues/myxolydian scale?


Typically I adapt to the change via using a chord tone approach, and then make my way back inside the harmony, when it returns to chords that are diatonic to the key.

Best,

Sean