#1
Alright folks , here's my question :

when I play lead on e-b-g strings my palm rests on other strings and mutes them and my right hand has a reference point . But when I play (mostly rhythm) on lower strings without using palm muting , my hand is floating (no problem again if I use palm muting). Is it normal or should I anchor my pinky to have a reference point ?
#2
Your reference point is always the last string you picked. If it wasn't your picking would go to hell every time your hand was in a slightly different position.

Just practice playing on the lower strings, you'll get used to it in time.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
Since the previous poster didn't actually answer the question: it's normal for your hand to float when you're playing the lower strings without palm muting. Anchoring your pinky isn't obligatory, but if it helps you pick more accurately then go for it. Satriani often rests his right hand fingers 3, 4 and 5 (the ones not holding the pick) on the higher strings so he can mute them individually when they're not being played.
The more you say 'epic' the less it means.
Last edited by Dynamight at Aug 14, 2014,
#4
I think Dynamight has the right idea. I don't think there's a right answer, here, as your comfort while playing is the most important thing.
Anchoring isn't going to slow you down too much, I don't think. Do what feels right to you.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#5
Ok, I'll explain a bit then:

The problem isn't actually 'should I anchor or not'. The problem is "what do I do when my reference point no longer applies", which is actually not a problem since the reference point isn't where your palm is or isn't on the strings, it's the last string you picked.

The absolute direct answer to the question asked is "yes it's normal to float your hand" but that's really not the important part of what's going on here.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Ok, I'll explain a bit then:

The problem isn't actually 'should I anchor or not'. The problem is "what do I do when my reference point no longer applies", which is actually not a problem since the reference point isn't where your palm is or isn't on the strings, it's the last string you picked.

The absolute direct answer to the question asked is "yes it's normal to float your hand" but that's really not the important part of what's going on here.


I cant really get it . Suppose I'm only tremolo picking on open A string . Then ?
#7
Is it fair to say I have absolutely no idea where my hand goes when I play because I have no guitar in front of me at the moment? I couldn't tell you what I do with my picking hand because I don't think about it anymore.

I do see what you mean, Zaphod.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#8
I use a mixture of resting my palm on the lower strings and pinky anchoring. I think whatever works is fine really though I believe the important thing is that you're anchoring your arm on the body of the guitar so your hand and wrist stay relaxed and comfortable.
#9
I guess the point is you should follow what your picking hand tends to do naturally as you practice, and not worry about the "right" way to do it, since as ryan pointed out, there is none.
The more you say 'epic' the less it means.
#10
Quote by jaymzz31
I cant really get it . Suppose I'm only tremolo picking on open A string . Then ?


Then you use your arm to move your picking hand so it's in the same relative position to the A string as it is to the other strings when you're picking those and pick the same way. It might take a bit of getting used to but that's purely because you haven't spent enough time doing it before.

Quote by Dynamight
I guess the point is you should follow what your picking hand tends to do naturally as you practice, and not worry about the "right" way to do it, since as ryan pointed out, there is none.


Actually there very much is a right way of doing things. People's bodies (as long as they're free from disabilities) really don't vary that much at all, "everyone is different" only applies so far before you have to realise that, physiologically, people tend to be extremely similar.

If need be I can certainly point you towards a good few players who are approaching perfect technique, since you can only approach it and never achieve it... it's a bit like infinity that way.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually there very much is a right way of doing things. People's bodies (as long as they're free from disabilities) really don't vary that much at all, "everyone is different" only applies so far before you have to realise that, physiologically, people tend to be extremely similar.

If need be I can certainly point you towards a good few players who are approaching perfect technique, since you can only approach it and never achieve it... it's a bit like infinity that way.

Don't be pedantic. I wasn't generalizing that for all guitar techniques, but specifically the issue the OP had. I'm well aware there are some techniques that require specific methods and nothing else, but this isn't one of them, since I know several accomplished players that do it differently from one another.
The more you say 'epic' the less it means.
Last edited by Dynamight at Aug 14, 2014,
#12
Quote by Dynamight
Don't be pedantic. I wasn't generalizing that for all guitar techniques, but specifically the issue the OP had. I'm well aware there are some techniques that require specific methods and nothing else, but this isn't one of them, since I know several accomplished players that do it differently from one another.


I'm not being pedantic, I am outright stating: there is a right way to play guitar. No matter what you're doing there is a way to do it that places the least stress on your body and allows you the most efficient use of your energy. Just because some people have managed to work past that doesn't mean it's not true, it means that if they did things right they would be able to do it more easily.

I can literally point you at many players who are doing things the right way. I can point you to things they do that are less efficient than they could be. Anywhere you can point to things people are doing wrong means there must be a set of things classified as "right".
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
I'm working on playing tremolo picking riffs on the low E string at the moment and I found out that I can keep my hand from floating by picking the string a bit closer to the bridge. That way my palm is barely touching the bridge, but it's not really anchoring.
You could try it and see how that works for you.
Last edited by Scratcher17 at Aug 19, 2014,