#1
I recently changed to a set of 13-59s on my Les Paul Studio and tuned down to C standard. I corrected the intonation, and there's no buzzing anywhere.

The problem is on the low C string (the 59), any notes from about the 10th fret onwards sound like they're being muted a bit. It's not touching any extra frets, nor is it touching either of the pickups.

I don't really want to raise the action because absolutely everywhere else sounds great. What's wrong? Is this normal with such a thick string?
#2
You should check your neck relief after changing the gauge of your strings.
#3
Definitely check your neck relief.
Quote by ESP's user manual
To check neck bow, hold your guitar in playing
position and check the low E and high E strings using the following
method (Figure 7). With your fretting hand, hold down the string at
the first fret. Now with your picking hand thumb, fret the same string
at the area where the neck joins the body (around 16th fret). While
holding both sections of the string in place, stretch your index finger
of your picking hand as far as possible into the middle area of the neck
(frets 7-9) and tap the string down to the frets. The amount of distance
that the string is travelling to reach the frets is the amount of bow that
is in the neck (you may also use feeler gauges to measure this distance,
but it’s not necessary). It is desirable to have a slight amount of bow,
but not too much. About .3 mm - .5 mm (.010” - .020&rdquo is usually
plenty of bow.
Gear:

ESP EC-50
ESP FB-204

MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby
MXR EVH Phase 90
MXR Analog Chorus

"Music is the strongest form of magic." - Marilyn Manson
#4
Quote by unfunfionn
I recently changed to a set of 13-59s on my Les Paul Studio and tuned down to C standard. I corrected the intonation, and there's no buzzing anywhere.

The problem is on the low C string (the 59), any notes from about the 10th fret onwards sound like they're being muted a bit. It's not touching any extra frets, nor is it touching either of the pickups.


This is largely due to the scale of the guitar and has nothing to do with truss rod adjustments. Thick strings (and low notes) work much better when they have more string length to work with. This is why bass guitars have 34 and 36" scales, why baritones are usually 27-28" scales and why there are 30" scale guitars out there for the more extreme downtuners.

Think of a grand piano vs a small household upright spinet piano. The string length on a 9' grand piano is MUCH longer than it is on the spinet. If you play the bottom three or four notes on a spinet, you can barely hear the difference, and there's no power there. On a grand, they ring out with excellent definition.

Part of the reason that a truss rod adjustment is going to make no difference is that your problem is manifesting itself from the 12th fret up. The LP connects with the body at the 16th fret, and the truss rod stops before that. You're not going to affect relief on the guitar in that area.
#5
Thank you for the great info. I did a truss rod adjustment and since it didn't improve anything, I set it back to where it was before.

I love the heavy bottom string but I'll probably just get a higher gauge again. I'm doing a lot of blues stuff and the tension now makes bending even harder than when I was tuned to standard with a set of 10s.