#1
Any feedback would be appreciated! Price range $0-$700

I'm looking for a new guitar that sounds good and won't break the bank. I'm a young guitarist trying to hold my own in a bluegrass jam so I don't need anything spectacular. The Martin Dx1 was recommended by a fellow jammer and after reading a lot of reviews I'm seriously considering buying it.

Is there a guitar that can beat the price that can also provide a quality sound? From what I'm seeing the Dx1 is the most reasonable and provides a quality sound. If you guys could provide any incite it would be a big help! Thanks!
#2
Yamaha LL6 (600.00), Seagull S6 ($400.00) , and Epiphone DR-500MCE ($600.00) are good guitars. The Epiphone has an all solid wood build with electronics as well in case you want to plug it in an amp. The Yamaha LL6 also has a solid Engelmann spruce top with rosewood sides. It does not have electronics however. Seagull S6 has a solid cedar top, which makes this guitar sound a bit warm. These are my top three, all of them sound good. The Seagull is cheaper from both of them. If you really want to go cheap, I recommend getting a Yamaha FG700S. It costs like $200.00 but don't let that price fool you, it has a very very nice tone. It has a solid top as well which is a plus.

I would get the Epiphone though. All solid wood, with a preamp so you can plug it in. It sounds sweet too. But through testing, I preffered the FG700S's tone over the Seagull and the LL6 (gasp*).
Last edited by Hence My Name at Aug 18, 2014,
#3
I've had my DX-1 for many years. Absolutely love it. It's the rosewood one. Very warm, full sounding, lots of bass.
MY Music
AMPS:
Chute CC-04 2x12
GUITARS:
Fender American Deluxe Strat SSS (with DG-20's)
Martin Dx-1
PEDALS:
Big Muff Pi Tone Wicker
Keeley Mod Bluesdriver
Holy Grail Plus Reverb
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Boss RC-2 Loop pedal
#4
Quote by pawnluv
I've had my DX-1 for many years. Absolutely love it. It's the rosewood one. Very warm, full sounding, lots of bass.

FWIW, there is no such thing as a "rosewood DX-1". They're all HPL(*), (high pressure laminate), made to look like rosewood. Basically, rosewood patterned Formica.

They don't still shoot the messenger, do they?

(*) Solid sitka spurce top though.

With that being said, the Martin would still carry some heritage Martin sound, very popular with bluegrass players.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 18, 2014,
#5
OK, here's my heavily biased opinion based on my history with four Martins (Three of which had problems) and having played many Taylors and Martins in my mate's store. Buy a Taylor 100 series, eg 110, 114. Great sound, in their own way, and a fully bolt-on neck that is very easy to reset.
#6
Quote by Tony Done
OK, here's my heavily biased opinion based on my history with four Martins (Three of which had problems) and having played many Taylors and Martins in my mate's store. Buy a Taylor 100 series, eg 110, 114. Great sound, in their own way, and a fully bolt-on neck that is very easy to reset.
OK, "Fretfrier" is a man of strong conviction, (as was everyone else who participated in this thread).

Enjoy: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1651818

As for me, my friend came home with a Martin D- something. I was into the electric at the time. Needless to say, I wasn't impressed with it. Not one iota.

Then later, I had to glue the soundboard braces back into it. Humidity or faulty workmanship, who knows, who cares.

And yeah, there was very little saddle showing by the time I had it set up as playable.

Maybe they buried the poor alcoholic sod with it.

That's my only Martin story, and I'm sticking to it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 18, 2014,
#7
Quote by Captaincranky


Yes, a good more or less civilised thread, unlike most Martin/Taylor. I like pic of The Doc in the last post. He might be using a Shubb, the guitar sure isn't a Martin or or Taylor!
#8
+1 for Seagull S6. This is the guitar I'd buy if I were you. Read up on it, the reviews don't lie. I have owned one for 6 or 7 years and it just sounds better as time goes on. Martin makes quality guitars too, but they're expensive. Ultimately it comes down to what YOU want, but I'd recommend the Seagull S6.
#9
Hi, Guitar is one time investment. Make sure it should of good quality. Check out some good music store .
Last edited by elaenacardona at Jan 2, 2015,
#10
Yamaha A1R or A1M and Seagull Maritime SWS are great guitars in the $700 range.
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
FWIW, there is no such thing as a "rosewood DX-1". They're all HPL(*), (high pressure laminate), made to look like rosewood. Basically, rosewood patterned Formica.

They don't still shoot the messenger, do they?

(*) Solid sitka spurce top though.

With that being said, the Martin would still carry some heritage Martin sound, very popular with bluegrass players.


Then why does rosewood laminate back and sides cost $100 more than mahogany laminate(per same model). Why do they sound different?
#12
Quote by rohash
Then why does rosewood laminate back and sides cost $100 more than mahogany laminate(per same model). Why do they sound different?
The only thing I call tell you perhaps the rosewood dyes sound different.

There is nothing in the specs to suggest it's anything other than mojo.

Mahogany: http://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/369-dx1.html

Koa: https://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/148-dx1kae.html

Rosewood: https://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/149-dx1rae.html

You know that rosewood is supposed to cost more than mahogany, right? Well, C.F.Martin has know that a lot longer than you.

Do an end run around the price and go for the koa model. it's only 50 dollars more...

With that said, M'sF shows them all al the same price, lefty included: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/search?sB=r&Ntt=Martin+X+Series+DX1

GC show them @ $499.95, but they also show a lower list price. That being the case, they might still have old stock on hand, and Martin has since raised the price.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 2, 2015,
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
The only thing I call tell you perhaps the rosewood dyes sound different.

There is nothing in the specs to suggest it's anything other than mojo.

Mahogany: http://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/369-dx1.html

Koa: https://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/148-dx1kae.html

Rosewood: https://www.martinguitar.com/model/item/149-dx1rae.html

You know that rosewood is supposed to cost more than mahogany, right? Well, C.F.Martin has know that a lot longer than you.

Do an end run around the price and go for the koa model. it's only 50 dollars more...

With that said, M'sF shows them all al the same price, lefty included: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/search?sB=r&Ntt=Martin+X+Series+DX1

GC show them @ $499.95, but they also show a lower list price. That being the case, they might still have old stock on hand, and Martin has since raised the price.


And even two martins of exactly the same model can sound very different. I would bet money that any tonal difference between the different finishes on DX-1s from the same production series is matter of chance.
#14
Yeah, I see what you are saying. The Martin DX-1 models say HPL with rosewood, mahogany or koa grain pattern for the back and sides and they are all the same price. Other brands are different though. Yamaha for instance, the A1R and FG730s are $100 more than the A1M and FG700s and the only difference is the backs and sides are rosewood instead of mahogany. They are laminate but not listed as HPL like the Martins. The Yamaha A1-series also has a flamed maple back and sides now that is $50 cheaper than the mahogany. Leads me to believe that other brands actually use the stated wood in their laminate models. My A1R sounds dark and subdued like rosewood is supposed to while I have a washburn with laminate mahogany b/s, both solid spruce tops and it sounds loud and bright.
#15
I'm sure the brands you mention do use the real deal, at least for the outer laminate, and very likely also the inner one. I also think that even in laminate b&s, the type of timber affects the tone, though maybe not as much as in a solid guitar. I reckon that there is a strong upside to this - the comparatively small effect of the b&s timber, when laminated, means the the guitars have a more uniform "conservative" tone - which I happen to like. Big upfront tones might sound good in the shop, but I've found that they can be too much of a good thing played in the quiet and tranquility of my man cave.