#1
I play in a wide range of tunings from drop A to standard and I've got a couple problems. The first is that I break my high e string tuning a lot. Any time I'm going from high to low or low to high by a large margin it'll break. I'm gonna assume this is a no no but just wondering why it happens. To alleviate this I've purchased a second guitar, and I'm thinking I'll keep one in tunings from drop A to drop C and the other in tunings from C# to standard. Would that be wise?

Also with my first guitar apparently the neck got quite warped. Someone told me that the tension from the strings changing can cause this...is that accurate? I know heat can also be a factor....is neck warping something that just happens to guitars over time? Or is there anything you can do to stop it?

Yet another question...once I get this guitar set up(it's quite a bit more expensive and Im in a band now so I want to get it set up) can I change the tuning on it or will I damage the guitar?
#2
Any time I'm going from high to low or low to high by a large margin it'll break.

There’s probably a burr or a nick in the saddle that’s cutting the string.

I've purchased a second guitar, and I'm thinking I'll keep one in tunings from drop A to drop C and the other in tunings from C# to standard. Would that be wise?

It’s a good start, but you’ll probably want another guitar at some point. I have two guitars for D–E, one for C/C#, and one for A–B.

Also with my first guitar apparently the neck got quite warped.

Or maybe it just needs a truss rod adjustment. Take it to a guitar tech and see what he says.

Someone told me that the tension from the strings changing can cause this...is that accurate?

Generally no. Warping can be caused by heat (especially if it melts the glue in a multi-piece neck) but it’s usually just because the neck was made from a bad piece of wood that expands and contracts unevenly. A warranty might cover replacement. Guitar necks are much more sturdy than most people realize and can usually handle a wide range of tension without much trouble. Strings will break long before you can create enough tension to warp a guitar neck.

once I get this guitar set up(it's quite a bit more expensive and Im in a band now so I want to get it set up) can I change the tuning on it or will I damage the guitar?

Changing the tunings will not damage the guitar.

On…an…unrelated…note…learn to write without using ellipses all over the place.
#3
By tuning your guitar (either way), the strings are being wrapped and unwrapped around the tuning post. If you do this quite frequently, a thing called metal fatigue happens, where after constant bending the string becomes brittle, and eventually snaps. This is further exaggerated when you tune from a low tuning to high one, as you are putting much more tension on the strings without giving the neck time to adjust (this also causes the neck to warp from constant changes in tension, but there are many other factors).

The E and D strings are the weakest strings on an electric guitar (the string underneath the winding on the D string is actually thinner than the B or G), so naturally those will be the first ones to go. What I recommend (this has helped me quite a lot with my acoustic, I use many different altered tunings and the G string, the weakest one, would always snap) is staying in a certain tuning for a while before changing, and when tuning up only go a step or half a step at a time. So if you're playing in drop A, don't go straight to E, as a jump that wide can be risky if your strings aren't new. Instead, tune it to drop B and keep it there for a while, then maybe go to drop C or D standard, then eventually go to E.

How often do you change the tuning? If you do it more than once a day then i'd say keep one guitar for D standard to E standard, and one for everything lower (depending on what gauge strings you use and the scale length of your guitar, going from drop B standard to C# standard shouldn't be too big an issue).

I'd say take it all to a tech, have him look at it and ask for his advice. He could recommend what tunings to use on what and string gauges and all that jazz.

Changing the tunings won't damage your guitar. As long as your guitar has a truss rod (and unless your guitar is $20 or has graphite rods running through it, I'm almost certain it does), any issues in neck tension and warping can be fixed by taking it to a tech or with a couple of turns of the truss rod and a few days rest. Just don't do something silly like use 15 gauge strings with E standard and you'll be fine.

Hope this helped.
#4
I know there are some folks getting tired of my bombing these threads with my particular alternative, but if you're not recording or playing out (and even if you are), you might want to take a look at a Variax guitar (I have three). All of the current JTV-series guitars and most of the older models allow you to retune the guitar (and save it as a preset) *electronically.* They use pitch replacement technology to change the pitch of each individual string (amplified, that is) at least an octave down and not quite that much up.

I have a JTV-89F that sports (as factory presets) downtuning, both in standard and in Drop tunings, down to the Baritone range. The last Drop tuning is Drop Bb. Any other tuning within that octave is available, including bass tunings.

But the main point is that the actual string tension never changes. The bad news is that if you're going to play unplugged, you'll be in E standard. The good news is that you don't need extra guitars, you don't need to re-intonate every time you change tuning, you don't need thicker strings, you don't need longer scales, you don't need extra guitars. You don't need a new setup every time you turn around.

There's more good news. Since the JTV also has guitar models built in, you can play single coil type guitars with intense gain and without the kind of noise that you ordinarily fight with single coil guitars. And of course you can switch from a "sensitive" 12-string introduction to an all-out sonic assault overdriven Drop Bb in a single beat if you need to. And back again just as quickly.