#2
Reverb helps.

Some bands will cut out the low end on vocals, too, depending on how stark of an effect you want.

Another technique is to double vocal tracks, which has the effect of making it louder.
#3
That's a single tracked vocal, with maybe a bit of stereo spreading, maybe a bit of chorus, some bass cut out, and reverb.

Try different reverb spaces to find the one that best suits the track.

Also double tracking stuff makes it sound louder but that's hardly the purpose of it - the purpose is making stuff sound wider and fuller.

It's mostly done with electric rhythm guitars.
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#4
Quote by Spambot_2
Also double tracking stuff makes it sound louder but that's hardly the purpose of it - the purpose is making stuff sound wider and fuller.

I wasn't referring to double tracking, actually. I was simply saying copying a track, which would only cause vocals, in this case, to sound louder. Since we wouldn't be panning differently, this wouldn't have the effect of making it sound wider and fuller; just louder.

Depending on the singer's style (basically, think "pseudo-falsetto"), some bands can do this and get an effect similar to the link TS gave.
#5
Play with some different reverb combinations. Try tracking it with a plate reverb and then in post put on a deep hall reverb on it.