#1
Just wondering.

I've always kinda' wanted to try drums but never got around to it. I've always played guitar but drums are kind of an expensive thing to get into and to keep up and I don't have any friends that play drums either so Id have to buy a set.

Just wondering how difficult it is to learn at a later age and maybe if I should look into it more? Or just say fack it and stick to guitar.
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#2
I'm traditionally a guitarist and I've lately started screwing around with drums since my band's being practicing at my house and the drummer has been leaving his kit set up here.
I've found that drums is relatively quick to get an okay basis and put a simple solid beat down as long as you have a good sense of rhythm and coordination but to really get into it and start being creative and play with flair and uniqueness is really quite hard.

It's kind of like bass, I find. Pretty quick to pick up a basic level but pretty hard to start actually playing and feel comfortable.
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#3
Just wondering.

I've always kinda' wanted to try drums but never got around to it. I've always played guitar but drums are kind of an expensive thing to get into and to keep up and I don't have any friends that play drums either so Id have to buy a set.

Just wondering how difficult it is to learn at a later age and maybe if I should look into it more? Or just say fack it and stick to guitar.

It depends on so many things how much a drum kit will cost you.

New or used. How many drums you desire. The cymbal stands again how many and type. If you wanted the Tama stilt HC104TB you cannot get them any longer and the price can go up because of that. Cymbals and hihat? Pedals etc.

Still a Marshall stack and a Jackson RR US custom shop is more expensive.

How difficult? Again its a habit thing and the more time the more you get out. It helps having it setup and be able to play when you want at any given time. Play along with something helps a lot and spending some time on the basic rudiments could loose up the playing it did for me.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Aug 24, 2014,
#4
That's tough to answer. Everybody is different. So people have natural rhythm and some don't.
I do get the hint. I just choose to ignore it.
#5
The best thing a drummer can do is keep a steady beat. This can be learned easily without any gear, just tap your hands and feet. At first it seems impossible to keep the HH going while you just do bass, snare, bass, snare 1/2 or 1/4 notes with a constant HH 1/8 notes. When you can do that (comes in a few hours) you are officially a drummer. Almost nobody can do it right away, some drummers suck at it and can only do a few beats. The rolls and stuff come later, and are nice to be good at but never needed really, the beat is everything IMO