#1
Our band is currently having this discussion and I think outside voices would be useful and this could help others too.

Anyways, our vocalist is of the opinion that we should play straight covers mixed with originals (we play mostly at places where music isn't just an after thought)

My opinion is that we should put an original take on covers to grab more interest and to fit in better with our originals. My stance being that people going specifically out for music are looking for something a little different.

TLDR: Straight Covers mixed with originals vs Different Style Covers with orginals
#2
If you can make your "different style" covers interesting, go for it. There's nothing wrong with playing coves that try to sound like the original either. If you are playing a few covers, why not go for a mix of both?
#3
Covers are fine, just make sure if you have say a 6 song set, or half hour, you very it so it's like 2 covers and 4 originals, as for the covers themselves usually playing songs which are in your genre/inspire your band work well, and you can still put your own twist into them
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#4
Quote by Thrasherx00
If you are playing a few covers, why not go for a mix of both?


I'd be tempted to say that (though i don't gibg so take what i say with a pinch of salt ). then you can see how both types of cover go down with the crowd and adjust your plans based on that.
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#7
Quote by Sean0913
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Yes, we have our foot in the door at two places as our vocalist has gigged at them before, we just need to show him some of our originals first.
#8
Quote by ToneMasterDelux
Yes, we have our foot in the door at two places as our vocalist has gigged at them before, we just need to show him some of our originals first.

Why not ask the management if you could play a re-arranged cover for them at the same audition? If they don't like it, then just do regular covers.
#9
do not mix covers and originals

it's a rookie mistake IMO
#10
I think if you want to do originals as well, it's important to be yourselves when doing covers. The thing is with that, is that some people really want to hear the song on their CD, so, you probably don't generally want to deviate too far away, but sometimes that can be cool as well.

The choice of songs makes a big difference as well. It's a bit different if you take something already similar to your genre. If you take something very different, then that can be cool if you play that adapted to your style. And because it is so different, just adapting it to your instruments, and genre adds cool variety and makes it your own.

For example live and let die, originally a paul mccartney tune,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZohPmz0RVVY


and covered by guns and roses.

http://youtu.be/6D9vAItORgE?t=11s

So sometimes an important part of doing covers can be finding a cool tune, that will sound cool with your band playing it, but which does not come from a band that is like yours.
#11
If you are an original band and want to do covers, add your own twist to them. I don't see a point with playing them note for note. Because who wants to listen to your version if it's identical to the original version?
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#12
Quote by Hail
do not mix covers and originals

it's a rookie mistake IMO


I'm behind this statement 100%. If you're an original band play originals. Put the time into writing more songs if you don't have enough songs. Write better songs if the audience doesn't like your originals.

Alternatively become a cover band and don't play originals.

I know you'll say "but that massive band plays covers in their sets and they're massive". Well that band became famous off the strength of their originals, not their covers. If you insert covers into you sets as a permanent feature before you become massive the audience will only remember your covers, and none of your originals.

Playing covers in an original band only serves to detract from your originals, and over time the audience can even come to expect the covers, even start requesting them.

I did some session work for a local artist who played half originals half covers. After a gig an audience member asked if she had any EPs and she said yes. They asked if she had a certain cover on the EP and she said no. They were disappointed and didn't buy the EP. Obviously an extreme example but that's how it goes.

However, if you NEED to play covers you can choose to cover songs that nobody knows. If you don't tell the audience it's a cover they won't know. This way the cover will not detract from your originals. I still wouldn't make this a staple of your set though, because that song may become your most popular song but you will have no benefit from recording and selling it at a later date.
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#13
If you're doing mostly original songs, you should probably focus on that and maybe throw in a couple of covers at most. Do at least 90% original.

If you're mostly covers, there's no room for original songs.

Very generally speaking, covers bands and originals bands market to a different audience, so you have to pick one direction over the other
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#14
Quote by AlanHB
I'm behind this statement 100%. If you're an original band play originals. Put the time into writing more songs if you don't have enough songs. Write better songs if the audience doesn't like your originals.

Alternatively become a cover band and don't play originals.

I know you'll say "but that massive band plays covers in their sets and they're massive". Well that band became famous off the strength of their originals, not their covers. If you insert covers into you sets as a permanent feature before you become massive the audience will only remember your covers, and none of your originals.

Playing covers in an original band only serves to detract from your originals, and over time the audience can even come to expect the covers, even start requesting them.

I did some session work for a local artist who played half originals half covers. After a gig an audience member asked if she had any EPs and she said yes. They asked if she had a certain cover on the EP and she said no. They were disappointed and didn't buy the EP. Obviously an extreme example but that's how it goes.

However, if you NEED to play covers you can choose to cover songs that nobody knows. If you don't tell the audience it's a cover they won't know. This way the cover will not detract from your originals. I still wouldn't make this a staple of your set though, because that song may become your most popular song but you will have no benefit from recording and selling it at a later date.


Good point, agreed. I didn't think of that.

And LOL at the last bit
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#15
also i notice nobody mentioned Alien Ant Farm

decent cover of a great song and now nobody will ever know anything they've ever made themselves ever. at least papa roach gets to reap the writing benefits of being a one-hit wonder 90s band
#16
I understand not mixing covers with originals but I thought one way bands got more attention was to play covers and then gradually replace them with all originals, at least I'm pretty sure Phish did that, but they were jazz standards...
#17
Quote by Hail
do not mix covers and originals

it's a rookie mistake IMO


Haha, The Stones first two US tours were nearly all cover tunes.

And The Beatles, The Stones, Ray Charles, Etta James, Santana, Clapton, Hendrix, SRV, Van Halen, John Mayer, Def Leppard, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Limp Bizkit, Korn, Linkin Park, Weezer, Stryper, System of a Down, Pantara, and many others just kept making that mistake over and over. Meanwhile needing a Brinks truck to haul away all the money. Most of these major recording artists were "discovered" while playing covers live with a few keen originals sprinkled in. Maybe it's not such a bad idea after all.

If you are going to do covers, do them really well and put your own stamp on them. People appreciate hearing a fresh take on a song they know.
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Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 27, 2014,
#18
When, certainly, the Stones and Beatles are relevant comparisons because the musical landscape hasn't changed at all since then. I mean, it's exactly the same.

I think playing A cover can be a good tool. It's a song the audience can connect with, and if you do it with an original style and panache it can be an access point for the rest of your music.

Back in the 80s it used to be a really common thing for record companies to want bands to put a cover on albums. eg, "Peace Train" isn't on that 10,000 Maniacs album because they loved it, but rather because the record company knew that it was familiar and people would gravitate towards it. This was a really common part of breaking acts.

I've certainly been at a lot of shows where the audience perked up for a cover. Obviously, that can be a trap, but, for example, I've seen bands where, as the set gets dancier, throw in a cover to help get people on the floor ... and then keep them there with originals.

But it's A cover, not a bunch of covers. It's something done in your style, to help the audience connect to your music - it's a cover that gives you a chance to show off what makes you special is a slightly more digestible form.

Of course, take this with a grain of salt, Alan has about 50 million times as much gigging experience as I do. But I've noticed that a lot of bands do ONE cover to their benefit.
#19
Quote by ToneMasterDelux
I understand not mixing covers with originals but I thought one way bands got more attention was to play covers and then gradually replace them with all originals, at least I'm pretty sure Phish did that, but they were jazz standards...


Well lets consider this with Cajundaddy's statement:

Quote by Cajundaddy
Most of these major recording artists were "discovered" while playing covers live with a few keen originals sprinkled in.


Feel free to cite your source mate. I would like to hear the part where A&R reps went to watch cover bands to discover original bands.

You've been on the cover band circuit for a while (although as noted in a different thread we play to different demographics). You would know how important song choice is to a successful cover band. Playing the wrong song can completely ruin a set sometimes in terms of dance floor flow.

What benefit do you think you would get if you played your original song, a song that nobody knows, 3 hours into your 4 hour set, at midnight to a room of drunks, inbetween Summer of 69 and Thunderstruck? Would you say that this is a really good idea and it would really keep everyone on the dance floor?

I ask this because I think it is a horrible idea. It would result in half the dancefloor leaving and the manager of the bar looking at you angrily and noting not to book you ever again. You were paid to play covers and you're chasing away the audience with your originals.

The situation doesn't happen necessarily because your original music is bad, its just that familiarity goes a long way with the audience at a covers gig. If they don't know a song, they are unlikely to dance to it. This is the reason why bars hire cover bands over original bands.

Basically I'm saying if what you say is true all the artists you suggested were out-of-work cover bands who were each low on bookings because they had a habit of playing originals when they were paid to play covers. For this reason I do not believe that all the artists you listed were primarily cover bands at the time they were signed.

Quote by HotspurJr
I've certainly been at a lot of shows where the audience perked up for a cover. Obviously, that can be a trap, but, for example, I've seen bands where, as the set gets dancier, throw in a cover to help get people on the floor ... and then keep them there with originals.


SIDENOTE: Your set should never "get dancier". If your band is a dance band you should be aiming to have the audience on the floor from the first song.

BACK TO TOPIC: It's the ideal situation. The audience will get up going "oh I know this song" (just like how they would leave the floor in the former example when they don't know the song) and then when the next original play they stay on the dancefloor going "wow this song is just as good".

But it doesn't really happen that way.

They'll jump up for the cover, and one of two things will happen.

(a) They'll sit down half way through the next (original) song.

or

(b) The audience stays up dancing.

Now, for those gigs where people stayed up dancing, I have a little quiz (play at home too kids).

1. What was the name of the cover the band played that made everyone dance?

2. What was the name of the band that wrote the cover?

3. What was the name of the original song that was played straight after the cover?

4. Can you hum just a little bit of the original song?

5. What was the name of the band that you were watching?

6. Did listening to the cover make you decide to buy the original band's album or EP?


You get the idea. There are a lot of crackpot theories about mixing covers and originals, and I'm pretty sure I've tried them all. People tend to get upset over this subject because what I suggest conflicts with what their band is doing currently.

In the end you are not doing much to help your originals if you become known primarily as the band who does their own twist on Seven Nation Army. You will be doing yourself a big favour if you don't play covers in an attempt to please the audience. It is far more beneficial to instead write good original songs in an attempt to please the audience.

If you are thinking at home "well all I want is a massive dance floor and I don't care about originals" - make a cover band! They're heaps of fun, you get your chops up and you'll make some cash doing it.
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#20
I think if you are a cover band, then you need to stick quite closely to the songs you are covering, and you should not play originals.

But if you plan to play originals, then I think it's ok to throw in a cover or two, and in this case, I think it is beneficial to put your own twist on it. What you're looking for here is "Ya, and I liked how played "popular song x" that was awesome, I liked it better than the original."

If you strive for playing originals and people only like your covers which do not deviate much from the recorded song, then your originals or your modified covers are not well liked enough by those audiences. Like, if you "become known primarily as the band who does their own twist on Seven Nation Army." then that's not because you did a cover of seven nation army that screwed you, that's because your cover overshadowed the rest of it, so the rest of it wasn't good enough.

Lots of artists do covers, lots started out doing covers, lots have the odd cover they do here or there even though they are very big and famous, some cover versions are more popular than the original version, and some do a mix of both, like tommy emmanuel.

So, I think it's important to decide what it is you want to do, if it's originals then it's ok to sprinkle on a cover or two, but I think you should try and make it your own. If you want to do covers and get people dancing, I completely agree that people will want to hear as close to the original as possible, down to the solo and everything, but I think if you deviate a little on the solo it's not the end of the world. If you change the song then you need to make it in such a way that people will really like it better, or else you'll lose them as they think you butchered their good song. And if you throw in songs nobody knows, that's a faux pas imo. You want to play songs people know and like, if you're doing covers.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Aug 27, 2014,
#21
Quote by fingrpikingood
Like, if you "become known primarily as the band who does their own twist on Seven Nation Army." then that's not because you did a cover of seven nation army that screwed you, that's because your cover overshadowed the rest of it, so the rest of it wasn't good enough.


It could be that Seven Nation Army overshadowed the rest of it because it was a worldwide hit, had millions of dollars put into advertising it and the audience actually knows it.

If this is the case it doesn't matter how good your unknown original is - it's going to be overshadowed.
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#22
Awww geezzz don't be a putz Alan. Do your homework man. Wiki is your friend

The Beatles first album- half covers
The Stones first 2 tours- mostly covers, first album- covers
Clapton- Yardbirds- mostly covers
Ray Charles 1st album- half covers
Etta James- mostly covers her whole career
Santana-1st album- 3 covers, Abraxas- 4 covers
EVH- cover band for 5 years- 2 covers on the 1st album (I was in the room with these guys in 1975)
SRV- Mostly Blues covers for 10 years. Discovered at Montreaux covering Freddie King & Hound Dog Taylor
Def Leppard- always doing covers
Jimi- covered everybody- Played covers at Monterrey Pop and Woodstock
John Mayer- Always played a mix of covers and originals

I know less about the younger cats but Dimebag often covered Black Sabbath when playing live.
Get a grip.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#23
^^^ Wiki is full of crap.

The question wasn't "how many covers were on their first albums", the question was how many of these bands played primarily covers with a "sprinkling of originals".

In the absence of any evidence supporting the occurrence since the 60s, we can still discuss from a practical angle about being in cover bands as we've both been in the scene for a while.

I can attest that I have not developed a demand for my originals through playing covers. Have you? What about record deals? Did you score any Sony execs drooling over your arrangements of popular songs? I sure didn't.
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#24
hehe * pokes head firmly in sand*

If you don't like Wiki, it has these cool things called footnotes that lead you to primary literature. Many of these links will take you to autobiographies or interviews with the original artists. Listen to any of these bands earliest live recordings. Yep, mostly cover tunes with a few originals in the beginning.

Back in my day Van Halen was THE cover band in LA who also tossed in a few originals. They played covers in Gazzarri's for 5 long years before being discovered by Gene Simmons. DLR is still around and quite chatty. If you don't believe me cause I am just some dude on the internet, ask him. He was there, often returns emails these days and his memory is still rather good.
http://www.vhnd.com/2014/04/11/van-halens-early-days-at-gazzarris/

The modern equivalent might be Weezer. They have always done a ton of covers and put their stamp on every one. Check em out if you are truly curious.
http://www.setlist.fm/stats/covers/weezer-33d6a4f9.html

Even Justin freaking Bieber got his big break singing covers on youtube. Now I don't want his life, but most of us would gladly accept his paychecks.
http://jam.canoe.ca/Music/Artists/B/Bieber_Justin/2009/11/16/11763306-sun.html

My band in 1983 did generate label interest but infighting and cocaine killed us off pretty quickly. The experience did lead me to some LA session work and briefly backing up Bill Medley (Righteous Bros) for a while.

There is a 50 year history of major recording acts who were discovered while doing "mostly covers", and were groomed because of their outstanding performances, not their songwriting skills. We can choose to either embrace this fact or ignore it.

In the end, we each believe what we choose to believe.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 27, 2014,
#25
Quote by AlanHB


You get the idea. There are a lot of crackpot theories about mixing covers and originals, and I'm pretty sure I've tried them all. People tend to get upset over this subject because what I suggest conflicts with what their band is doing currently.


I'm not getting upset (not in a band currently), rather, I'm finding myself confused by the difference between your experience (which I am not challenging the validity of in any way) and the fact that record companies love to have bands do a cover, and that I've seen a lot of originals throw in ONE cover to great effect.

eg, one of the best musical experiences I ever had was seeing Lizz Wright for the first time. I was completely unfamiliar with her music. The last song of her set was a cover of Led Zeppelin's "Thank You" which was freakin' amazing.

I went home humming that song, bought her album for that song, and have subsequently listened to the whole album a whole bunch of times. Honestly, none of the other songs stuck with me after that one live listen (although I've grown to appreciate several of them).

And this is, I think, a pretty common tactic used for marketing new bands at a mainstream adult audience. I mentioned 10,000 Maniacs and Peace Train (and recall an interview where Natalie Merchant said that was at the request of the record company). R.E.M. covering "Superman" (also, I believe, at the record company's request). More recently, Tina Dico covering "Don't think Twice." A friend of mine who I suspect is going to blow up in the next year (recently co-wrote a song for Lana Del Rey) has always mixed a cover of "I Am the Walrus" into his sets. Eva Cassidy did a ton of covers. Shawn Colvin kickstarted her career by doing a full album of covers. Glen Hansard's sets (in various bands) have often included a cover or two. Jeff Buckley and Hallelujah. Johnny Cash used covers to re-establish himself with a younger audience that had no interest in even the most famous songs which were associated with him originally. Seal covered Hey Joe and David Bowie.The Sundays covered the Stones.

So I'm not arguing with your experience at all. As I wrote originally, you've got a ton of gigging experience that I don't want to dismiss.

But can you see why I think there might also be something else going on?
#26
Quote by Cajundaddy
If you are going to do covers, do them really well and put your own stamp on them. People appreciate hearing a fresh take on a song they know.


Probably not the best example out there as we're still completely unheard of, but my current band is a cover band. We try to play the songs as close to the originals as possible... but we also throw in a couple of songs that aren't in our oeuvre (we do classic rock) like Nancy Sinatra (our singer loves'er), but we put a 'classic rock' spin on it by adding a solo or upping the tempo or what-not. So it's still the same song, but it sounds like 'us'.
#27
Quote by AlanHB
It could be that Seven Nation Army overshadowed the rest of it because it was a worldwide hit, had millions of dollars put into advertising it and the audience actually knows it.

If this is the case it doesn't matter how good your unknown original is - it's going to be overshadowed.


I think different audiences have different expectations. I think many people appreciate originals they love, and recognize that it is a good song that person wrote. Not everyone, but some people appreciate music for music, and not the recognition it has received. Those people will hopefully be at your show if you're playing at a venue like that.

That's why I think you should put your own twist on it as well, and make it your own. If I play a bunch of songs for you, and one of them is a cover, and all you liked was the cover, except you didn't like my version and wished I would have played it more faithfully to the version they are familiar with, then don't come to my next show.

There are all kinds of people in the world that like all kinds of things. Bands often get famous based on the strength of their songs. If coldplay was up and rising, not known by everyone and they played a cover, it's not like that will hurt them. It's not like people will only think of the cover they did. Not everyone just likes music based on how popular it is.

Lots of people loved coldplay, because of their songwriting, and went to see their shows because of their songwriting, and if they did a cover, that wouldn't hurt them. But they'd only do a few covers, I'm sure, and would adapt the song to their style, I'm sure, and people would like that about them.

If you want to get by on originals, your originals have to stand on their own. People have to like them, and want to hear them. Even if they have never heard them before. That's not easy. If you can do that, I really don't think doing a cover here or there is gonna hurt you.

I don't think that if you write great songs, and play a cover, then that will make people less likely to want to come and see you. If all they want to hear is your cover, then you are not writing good enough songs.
#28
Sorry Cajun but your links aren't supporting your argument. This is kind of interesting though:

Quote by Cajundaddy
My band in 1983 did generate label interest but infighting and cocaine killed us off pretty quickly. The experience did lead me to some LA session work and briefly backing up Bill Medley (Righteous Bros) for a while.


Let's talk about that band. What was the spread of covers/originals in that band? You'll probably come back and say 100% but you'll at least have a story to tell that backs up your theory.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#29
"In the absence of any evidence supporting the occurrence since the 60s,"
Ahem: Van Halen 1978, SRV 1983, Justin Bieber - 2010 Aaack!

Alan, at this point I am pretty certain nothing would meet your standards because you keep moving the target as it suits you. Surely there must be major recording artists out there who never mixed covers and originals while playing live and moving up the ladder. I just can't think of any.

Our band "The Citizens" 81-83 had about 30 covers and 12 originals, following a proven path laid by Van Halen and many others. We were playing Gazzarri's Hollywood along with every other juke joint and frat house in SoCal and had just finished recording a 6 song EP as a demo at Enactron Studios. Suddenly the drugs and the crazy collided and our lead singer and the other guitarist went to brawling instead of writing hit songs. C'est la vie.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#30
Quote by Cajundaddy
Alan, at this point I am pretty certain nothing would meet your standards because you keep moving the target as it suits you.


I don't agree that I have constantly moving goal posts. I simply asked for evidence that the bands played mostly covers with a sprinkling of originals and you linked to to albums and setlists with covers on them.

I will agree that Bieber was picked up on his originals. You could have also said Steel Panther, although their covers and original shows are generally kept separate if I understand correctly. It also appears that you flirted with some success doing it.

I have been approaching this issue with a pretty closed mind.

I have described in great detail why I think it is a horrible idea that a cover band should play originals, and I cannot understand exactly how a following for your original songs will come from playing them in a cover band.

However as far as you're concerned there is no real difference between a cover band and an originals band really as both have the potential to play originals and get signed.

Obviously these two viewpoints cannot coexist peacefully so we can just leave it to the readers to pick what approach works for them. We represent two extreme viewpoints and its unlikely that we'll have anyone who completely agrees with either of us....except our bandmates, who we've drilled this into time and time again haha.

Also I'd like to point out that these comments:

Quote by Cajundaddy
don't be a putz Alan

pokes head firmly in sand


Didn't win you any points with me.

Quote by Hotspur
I'm not getting upset (not in a band currently), rather, I'm finding myself confused by the difference between your experience (which I am not challenging the validity of in any way) and the fact that record companies love to have bands do a cover, and that I've seen a lot of originals throw in ONE cover to great effect.

.....

But can you see why I think there might also be something else going on?


Yes I can understand why you think there might be something else going on. You raise a good question. Why is it that covers seem to work for some bands and not for others?

I think it may be more to do with the fact that these artists are already established in their own right (in terms of local scene stuff) so they can take a risk on using the cover to promote the artist.

Another aspect may be their reasons for playing a certain cover. Let's not lie, most original bands will insert covers into their set because (a) they do not have enough music and/or (b) they want people to pay attention to them playing, and they currently are not.

Perhaps if an established artist plays a select cover because it means something to them and also shows off their influences it becomes "their own" and doesn't overshadow the rest of their work. In this case it may work in their favour.

But who knows, I may be talking crap. For all I know some kid is going to read the above and make their set half covers that inspire them because AlanHB said so.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#31
Quote by AlanHB

But who knows, I may be talking crap. For all I know some kid is going to read the above and make their set half covers that inspire them because AlanHB said so.


Well, there is no advice so good as to make it impossible for someone to mis-apply it.

Thanks for the response.
#32
Quote by Cajundaddy
Awww geezzz don't be a putz Alan. Do your homework man. Wiki is your friend

The Beatles first album- half covers
The Stones first 2 tours- mostly covers, first album- covers
Clapton- Yardbirds- mostly covers
Ray Charles 1st album- half covers
Etta James- mostly covers her whole career
Santana-1st album- 3 covers, Abraxas- 4 covers
EVH- cover band for 5 years- 2 covers on the 1st album (I was in the room with these guys in 1975)
SRV- Mostly Blues covers for 10 years. Discovered at Montreaux covering Freddie King & Hound Dog Taylor
Def Leppard- always doing covers
Jimi- covered everybody- Played covers at Monterrey Pop and Woodstock
John Mayer- Always played a mix of covers and originals

I know less about the younger cats but Dimebag often covered Black Sabbath when playing live.
Get a grip.


skimmed the last few posts but gonna point out

all of these but john mayer (read: an outlier) are from a very different time in the entertainment industry

i don't know if you've heard of this thing called the internet, but it's streamlined advertisement for a lot of people. you don't just go to a bar and check out the band nowadays - at least, not in the way people did when live music was a lot easier to accommodate.

you need to market to people to get them to come to your shows in a way that will make it financially viable to yourself and the owner of the venues where you perform

in order to market, you need to be concise. that means doing one thing really, really well. don't be the company trying to make phones, cars, freezers, and blenders - pick one and make it the best it can be, because plenty of people on the top of their games won't make that same mistake and in a bizarre "only one of these groups will get a deal of a lifetime" situation, you're gonna lose cause you didn't come out guns blazing.

not to mention that the modern record deal is completely trivialized. unless you're in the top .01% of performers like justin bieber or miley cyrus, your record deal means nothing. you need to learn to market yourself, not sit in the bar waiting to be discovered by some old dude who wants to hear your version of eye of the tiger

idk i'm half awake but this really rustled my jimmies
#33
Sorry if I rustled your jimmies. In order to accept the following quote, we would have to ignore the last 50 years of music history where major recording artists freely mixed covers and originals before, during, and after they were signed to a major label. And they all tended to make these songs their own instead of playing note-for-note copies. Since major record deals are effectively dead and buried, this all may be a moot point though.

Quote by Hail
do not mix covers and originals, it's a rookie mistake IMO


People put themselves in tiny boxes sometimes for all the wrong reasons and they just don't fit. See if there are any of your favorite major recording artists from this century in the following link, and ponder this a while longer (hint: Pantara, Def Leppard, Stryper, Satriani, Christina Aguilera, Norah Jones). Then break out of that tiny box... or not.


http://www.coversproject.com/

Follow your passion. If you play great music that stands up today, covers and/or originals and you do it with talent, skill and enthusiasm , you won't have to find fans or sell any more tickets to your shows. Fans will find you all on their own and gladly pay at the door or box office. Believing that Pay-to-play joints will bring any future reward or success is the rookie mistake here.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 31, 2014,
#34
If your looking to get out of the clubs and want a record contract i would recommend sticking to your originals.... If you don't have enough tunes for a full set pick more obscure covers....

No one in the us was familier with "Cum On Feel the Noise" by Slade until Quiet Riot... Metalica made Diamond Heads "AM i Evil"? famous...

There is no profit in going out night after night playing FM radio staples like Led Zep and the Stones unless you just want to have fun.
#35
Quote by Cajundaddy
Sorry if I rustled your jimmies.


It's really hard to give any consideration to your arguments when you say negative things like this.

Try a different approach.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#36
Wow, I was looking for the negative in that sentence but all I saw was an apology while restating his phrase from post #32. I didn't realize "I'm sorry" was so negative. You have my apology as well. Peace Alan.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 30, 2014,
#38
After reading through this thread, I've got to say, I really agree with Cajundaddy. Particularly with this bit:
Quote by Cajundaddy

Follow your passion. If you play great music that stands up today, covers and/or originals and you do it with talent, skill and enthusiasm , you won't have to find fans or sell any more tickets to your shows. Fans will find you all on their own and gladly pay at the door or box office. Believing that Pay-to-play joints will bring any future reward or success is the rookie mistake here.

Honestly TS, no matter what you do, whether it's straight covers, or 'arranged' covers (I much prefer altered covers to better suit your band), just put everything in it, and make sure you have fun with it

I also like how the thread went from this in the OP:
Quote by ToneMasterDelux

TLDR: Straight Covers mixed with originals vs Different Style Covers with orginals

to an argument about whether or not bands actually can use covers and be successful with original music, which is only vaguely related to OP, and really doesn't help the TS at all with his question.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
Last edited by Baby Joel at Aug 31, 2014,
#39
Quote by ToneMasterDelux
TLDR: Straight Covers mixed with originals vs Different Style Covers with orginals


The latter is definitely way better. In fact, this is objectively the best cover of all time, despite being very different from the original, and Roger Water agrees with that sentiment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEvznepdGDI
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.