#1
Hi everyone, i need some help.

I currently play a gibson les paul studio with a fender blues deluxe reissue amp.
I'm very happy with this guitar, however sometimes i feel like this guitar doesn't quite fit this amp. My sound is always trebly, but a bit tone-less at the same time, i'm not quite sure why.

Now i'm looking for another guitar to get a more indierock/punk kind of style that i can't quite get with my LP. Now there are two guitars i've been looking into:

a fender telecaster. all round great guitar, nothing special
...
and a gibson L6-S.
I know this guitar was originally made in de 70's and isn't easy to get nowadays.
Still i was wondering if someone knows more about this guitar, what genres you can play with it (i think you can play everything from jazz to rock, but i'm not sure)

AND do you think it's stupid to buy a l6-s when you have a les paul studio? I think it doesn't sound like a gibson at all. ANY TIPS PLEASE?
#3
There are a lot of guitars that will work great for P.A.I.R., but what kind of budget do you have?


* punk/alternative/indie/rock
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
I've never been around a Gibson LS-6, so I can't say anything about it. But if you define those genres the same way I do, the Tele is a great choice. Teles are very versatile, and with the right equpment, it can play pretty much anything.

Not to say that it will be more suitable than a Schecter for more aggressive music or semi-hollows for jazz, but it will work well enough. Or maybe it will- one equipped HH actually might work just as well, or better- which is probably the best pickup configuration in your case.
#5
Good brand to check out for options: Reverend.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Unless you're going for intentionally quirky, I would favor the Tele over the L6S.

That said, neither should sound particularly like the LP you already have, so despite that the L6S is a Gibson, either way you won't be getting something arguably redundant. The Tele will sound different due to its single coils, and the L6S because it has a maple body rather than mahogany (despite its humbuckers).
#7
Well guys, i'm looking at a telecaster at the moment (for real), thanks for the advice
#8
I'd also look at the G&L ASAT line if you're looking at Telecasters.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
G&L ASAT Special. Best of the tele world with the best of the Jazzmaster world.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#10
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jan 12, 2015,
#11
how expensive are they exactly? and i don't think i can get them in a normal shop in belgium
#12
G&L USA guitars are typically over $1000, even used. The Tribute models- made in Indonesia with almost all the exact same parts as the USA models- are priced mostly the same as Mexican Fender products and can typically be found in the $450-700 range.

If you can't find one where you are, check Reverb.com and eBay: you should be able to find someone willing to ship one to Belgium.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
Quote by Thomas_enzu
how expensive are they exactly? and i don't think i can get them in a normal shop in belgium


G&Ls are sometimes very tough to get outside of the United States (and even in the US, they only seem to be popular in major metropolitan areas, although they are available online). Luckily, Thoman.de currently carries some G&Ls for the European market; http://www.thomann.de/be/g-l.html, but if you're looking to try before you buy it might be near impossible.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


Fender MIM Stratocaster
Fender Jaguar Bass
Epiphone EJ200 Super Jumbo
Fender Excelsior 13w
Acoustic B300HD (with matching 1x12 cab)
BOSS BD-2W
NYC Big Muff Pi
#14
L6's from the 70's had a 6 position tone selector and bill Lawrence hb's. I would love to get my hands on one someday to play around with. In 2012 (?) they reissued the L-6S with a slightly smaller maple body and their regular humbuckers and a 3 way toggle. To me, that's not what that guitar was all about, but YMMV.

I was going to suggest something with P-90's in it. I've always loved them for being very expressive. They have some hum if you start turning the gain up, but I guess that's part of the charm. They're noisy, raw, and have some ass to the sound. Not as quiet or fat sounding as a humbucker, but very, very cool in my book.
#15
Yes, i like the sound of the P90's, but i don't know that much about other sorts of pickups.
I've put the idea of the l6-s out of my head, i'm looking into usa tele's and mexicans.
I have noticed there are many prize categories for a fender strat, i'm still figuring out why!
i'm just gonna test a couple and see
#16
Quote by Hydra26
L6's from the 70's had a 6 position tone selector and bill Lawrence hb's. I would love to get my hands on one someday to play around with. In 2012 (?) they reissued the L-6S with a slightly smaller maple body and their regular humbuckers and a 3 way toggle. To me, that's not what that guitar was all about, but YMMV..


I have an L6S from the '70's. Awesome guitar, and I did some serious hunting before I found the one I liked. Solid maple body and neck. Most had a maple fretboard and a clear finish. Mine is black on black with an ebony fretboard. The body is as thin as an SG's (and beveled) and wider than a Les Paul (it was widely referred to as Les Paul Road Kill). The upper fret access is far better than that on an SG, thanks to the wiiiide cutaway (the pointy horns on the SG always force me to rotate my hand to get to the upper frets.

The L6S was Gibson's first-ever 24-fret guitar. The Bill Lawrence-designed pickups have no screw-style pole pieces, three ceramic magnets and are Gibson's first "hot" pickups (about 1.5X the output of a PAF) and yet they are absolutely amazing sounding. Do NOT expect a Les Paul-sounding guitar. Too many people assumed that it would sound like an SG or LP and trashed the original pickups (and the 6-way pickup selector) trying to get it to sound like something it was purposely designed to NOT emulate.

And yes, that's a pickup selector, not a Varitone (as most non-owners assume).



Note that there's a master volume, a treble rolloff (what most of us mistakenly call a "tone" knob) and a mids rolloff.

My guitar:




There is a recent reissue out there. No, the body is not smaller; it's identical. No, they haven't substituted a 3-way (though these did show up in the 70's on other L6 models) -- that's still a 6-way. But there are changes. Gibson decided to put the larger LP-style headstock on the reissue (originals have a smaller headstock). The originals have a brass nut (plastic on the reissue) and a skinny bridge (that's the Schaller harmonica-style bridge on the originals). The originals have a 1 9/16ths" nut width, the reissue is 1 11/16ths" (but is not, sadly, much different in the actual string spacing). The reissue has substituted a *bass* rolloff pot for the mids rolloff knob on the original, and the reissue makes use of single coil modes, where the original used parallel modes (still humbucking) in the pickup selector. If it were me, and I found a worn-out original L6S, I'd probably consider picking up a reissue, shaking out the pickups and electronics, and putting the originals into the new body.

The L6S has been called "perhaps the best blues guitar there is" and is the result of Gibson commissioning Bill Lawrence to design a whole new sound system for the SG to offer a more "Fendery" sounding guitar. Unfortunately, Gibson bean counters got in the way and reduced the original budget for the guitar. They trashed his body design for what was eventually produced and modified the sound system (he originally used three switches to cover even more ground) and are responsible for the six-way.

On my guitar, playability is outstanding and sustain is excellent. It's an extremely comfortable guitar to play, thanks to the bevels and the thinner, wider body. The very mild neck-body size transition, wide cutaway horn and the positioning of the 24-fret board make it really comfortable to access the upper frets.

It's not even remotely close to a Gibson Studio (though the family resemblance is obvious) in terms of capability and sound.
#17
Nice!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#19
Hi Buddy,
I think you should scrap the idea of getting a new guitar and get a great new amp which will compliment your gibson les paul, it will sound like the guitar of your dreams with the Hiwatt Spitfire. It is designed for punk rock and is incredibly loud but incredibly expensive. But is very durable and will take impact from mosh pits, flying bottles and knickers. Heres a link to see what it looks and sounds like.

http://youtu.be/-SOpnjpKmPk

Mickey
#20
Quote by dspellman
I have an L6S from the '70's. Awesome guitar, and I did some serious hunting before I found the one I liked. Solid maple body and neck. Most had a maple fretboard and a clear finish. Mine is black on black with an ebony fretboard. The body is as thin as an SG's (and beveled) and wider than a Les Paul (it was widely referred to as Les Paul Road Kill). The upper fret access is far better than that on an SG, thanks to the wiiiide cutaway (the pointy horns on the SG always force me to rotate my hand to get to the upper frets.

The L6S was Gibson's first-ever 24-fret guitar. The Bill Lawrence-designed pickups have no screw-style pole pieces, three ceramic magnets and are Gibson's first "hot" pickups (about 1.5X the output of a PAF) and yet they are absolutely amazing sounding. Do NOT expect a Les Paul-sounding guitar. Too many people assumed that it would sound like an SG or LP and trashed the original pickups (and the 6-way pickup selector) trying to get it to sound like something it was purposely designed to NOT emulate.

And yes, that's a pickup selector, not a Varitone (as most non-owners assume).



Note that there's a master volume, a treble rolloff (what most of us mistakenly call a "tone" knob) and a mids rolloff.

My guitar:




There is a recent reissue out there. No, the body is not smaller; it's identical. No, they haven't substituted a 3-way (though these did show up in the 70's on other L6 models) -- that's still a 6-way. But there are changes. Gibson decided to put the larger LP-style headstock on the reissue (originals have a smaller headstock). The originals have a brass nut (plastic on the reissue) and a skinny bridge (that's the Schaller harmonica-style bridge on the originals). The originals have a 1 9/16ths" nut width, the reissue is 1 11/16ths" (but is not, sadly, much different in the actual string spacing). The reissue has substituted a *bass* rolloff pot for the mids rolloff knob on the original, and the reissue makes use of single coil modes, where the original used parallel modes (still humbucking) in the pickup selector. If it were me, and I found a worn-out original L6S, I'd probably consider picking up a reissue, shaking out the pickups and electronics, and putting the originals into the new body.

The L6S has been called "perhaps the best blues guitar there is" and is the result of Gibson commissioning Bill Lawrence to design a whole new sound system for the SG to offer a more "Fendery" sounding guitar. Unfortunately, Gibson bean counters got in the way and reduced the original budget for the guitar. They trashed his body design for what was eventually produced and modified the sound system (he originally used three switches to cover even more ground) and are responsible for the six-way.

On my guitar, playability is outstanding and sustain is excellent. It's an extremely comfortable guitar to play, thanks to the bevels and the thinner, wider body. The very mild neck-body size transition, wide cutaway horn and the positioning of the 24-fret board make it really comfortable to access the upper frets.

It's not even remotely close to a Gibson Studio (though the family resemblance is obvious) in terms of capability and sound.


Coulda sworn they went to a 3 way. My sales guy made a point to make me play it when it came into the shop but I was there putting a preorder in on a Moderne, so I wasn't terribly interested in paying 1800 bucks for an l6-s reissue. Lot's of little things looked off to me based on a bunch of research I'd done wanting to purchase one years ago. And it reminded me more of a midnight special than a standard L6-s. Honestly, in person the body struck me as seeming to look more compact than the original. Perhaps it was an optical illusion? When I started looking, one in great shape was running a little over 600 ish used but I was buying other things and by the time I got around to looking seriously, they were up to 1200. I've seen them go up and down a few times since then.

What I remember reading was an interview that said that Lawrence had been told by Gibson at the time to build a guitar to a specific price to add some variety to their lineup and that's what he came up with. Anyway, I'd love to get an older one someday. I've seen pictures of one or two in natural with a rosewood (I assume) board and I think I'd go that route just based on aesthetics if I had a choice but it's long since fallen off my priority list.