#1
Not sure if this is the right forum, but anyway. In a past couple of months, my low E string snapped several times (I almost always use same strings since I don't know when). I figured out that I'm hitting it harder, and palm mutting it harder, since I play metal, and things got to be agressive. Is this happening to anyone of you this often? I guess as my technique got "stronger", it all started, since I'm able to play very hard for a longer period of time. I don't believe it's a guitar issue. I use ernie ball, 10th's. Should I use 11th's, and would it effect bad on my guitar's neck, since I'm almost always in E standard? I have ibanez rga32. What do you think?
#2
Quote by kimi_page
Not sure if this is the right forum, but anyway. In a past couple of months, my low E string snapped several times (I almost always use same strings since I don't know when). I figured out that I'm hitting it harder, and palm muting it harder, since I play metal, and things got to be aggressive.

Do yourself a favor and drop this attitude. I've been playing metal for years, and the sooner you learn that you don't have to mutilate the fuck out of the low E string, the better off you'll be.

Is this happening to anyone of you this often? I guess as my technique got "stronger", it all started, since I'm able to play very hard for a longer period of time.

Ok, but you're stuck in bad technique here. You shouldn't be ever causing your low E string to snap. Stop strumming so hard.

I don't believe it's a guitar issue. I use ernie ball, 10th's. Should I use 11th's, and would it effect bad on my guitar's neck, since I'm almost always in E standard?

Won't solve your issue, because you'll still be mutilating your low E string.
#3
nothing wrong with a hard picking technique. it can be important to capture a certain tone, but yeah it will kill your string life

i'm not guessing that's it though, cause i play hard as hell and never had problems with a .10-.52 set, which is fairly standard. maybe you just need to beef up your low E, but a proper set-up will go a LONG way and it's very likely that there's a burr in your saddle that's cutting the string in conjunction with your technique

take it to a tech, let them check it out and set it up with a .52 and you shouldn't have any problems.
#4
Quote by Hail
nothing wrong with a hard picking technique. it can be important to capture a certain tone, but yeah it will kill your string life

You can capture that same tone without causing your E string to snap. Just saying.
#5
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
You can capture that same tone without causing your E string to snap. Just saying.


I agree with sam here. Hard picking is not necessary to get that tone, you can have great attack on the string without picking very hard.
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#6
Well, yeah, for "hard" picking. I practice a lot, and doing a lot of middle tempo practicing. For example, my string just snapped 2 hours ago, while I was doing some donwpicking at middle tempo, and when I practice at lower tempos, I just want to make sure my pick attack is sharp, I accent it, make it consistent, pick it harder etc. So I wasn't doing some crazy shit, just regular practicing, in which I believe, hard attack helps me develop some strength, and more endurance, and makes me play relaxed at higher tempos. You know what I'm saying, I'm sure.
#7
Quote by kimi_page
Well, yeah, for "hard" picking. I practice a lot, and doing a lot of middle tempo practicing. For example, my string just snapped 2 hours ago, while I was doing some donwpicking at middle tempo, and when I practice at lower tempos, I just want to make sure my pick attack is sharp, I accent it, make it consistent, pick it harder etc. So I wasn't doing some crazy shit, just regular practicing, in which I believe, hard attack helps me develop some strength, and more endurance, and makes me play relaxed at higher tempos. You know what I'm saying, I'm sure.

Soften your attack, dude. You don't need to attack harder at slower tempos.
#8
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Soften your attack, dude. You don't need to attack harder at slower tempos.

But than I have possitive results, when power and accuracy turns to speed. A while ago a teacher of mine told me that, about practicing harder at slower tempo, and I've been using that, because it makes a sommon sense to me.
#9
This is getting way too complicated. If you keep breaking your low E and you say it's definitely not a guitar issue then you are clearly playing too hard. End of story.
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Where's it breaking at?

Best,

Sean


Am surprised it's taken someone this long to ask this ESSENTIAL question.
#12
Quote by badfish_lewis
This is getting way too complicated. If you keep breaking your low E and you say it's definitely not a guitar issue then you are clearly playing too hard. End of story.

Yeah. I mean, yes, your teacher may have told you to play hard...but I don't think he or she meant to break your E string. Does your teacher know how often you break your E string?

Because you may want to discuss refining of your picking attack with him or her.
#13
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Yeah. I mean, yes, your teacher may have told you to play hard...but I don't think he or she meant to break your E string. Does your teacher know how often you break your E string?

Because you may want to discuss refining of your picking attack with him or her.


you haven't seen or heard his technique and can't verify that there isn't something wrong with the guitar, how are you going to make that assessment?

where the string breaks is a very good question

cheap (sub-1k) guitars tend to have QC issues with the saddle over time over something with, say, a hipshot or higher-end bridge
#14
Quote by Hail
you haven't seen or heard his technique and can't verify that there isn't something wrong with the guitar, how are you going to make that assessment?

I have not, no. But honestly, it's a fair question.

Either it's his technique, or it's his guitar. If the string is breaking near the saddle, then it's probably the guitar, though.
#15
If it's breaking at the saddle on the bridge, you've probably gut a metal bur on the saddle, which is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. You can get it filed down cheaply, or file it yourself.

Frankly, I doubt it's your 'hard technique.' Mostly because if you're beating your guitar hard enough to consistently break your thickest string, someone would've said something by now, whether it was your teacher or not, because you'd be nearly punching the instrument.

But as a general reference - 'harder' doesn't mean 'heavier' or 'more aggressive.' 90% of the recordings you listen to in metal are done with a lighter touch in the studio because hammering the strings makes it hard to intonate the guitar or even keep the strings in pitch with one another due to excessive bending based on the amount of pressure put on them. This causes a flux in the resonance between the strings, and sounds as if they're slightly out of tune with one another, and it takes a short bit for them to 'normalize.' The angle of your pick will help you get a more aggressive attack or 'bite' on the strings, but slamming them with your hand isn't going to do what you want.
#16
Ok guys, you're right, I didn't mention where it breaks, and yeah it does breat right at the saddle on the bridge. Every time. So, what should I do with the saddle?
#17
^^^ Hi Kimi. I'd personally take it to your local guitar shop and get the guitar checked out. I agree with clifhopper, just because it's really hard to break the low E string. I don't think I've ever broken it in my 15 years of playing.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Quote by kimi_page
Ok guys, you're right, I didn't mention where it breaks, and yeah it does breat right at the saddle on the bridge. Every time. So, what should I do with the saddle?
If the bridge has individual saddles, (most electrics do), you could always swap the saddles out between the E-6, and the A-5, and see if the A-5 starts breaking and/or the E-6 stops breaking.

If you're not familiar with setting intonation, just male a small mark on the bridge at the point where the saddle is, and line up the mark when you reassemble it. A Sharpie should do it. Mark on the metal, it will come off with alcohol, and absolutely stay away from the paint.

Usually if strings are breaking at the tuners, the tuning peg has a sharp edge on the string pull through hole. If it's breaking at the saddle, the sharp edge is there.

It really is quite difficult to summarily snap low strings.

Although I have to say, if it's not the saddle, you are probably going at it with too much enthusiasm.

I don't know if it matters as much when you're playing with a lot of gain, but strumming too hard when trying to play clean, sounds like poop. The string excursion is extreme, and the sound starts to get muddy. It can seem like the string is operating at different frequencies at different points. Anyway, the harmonic content seems to get a bit strange. Bluegrass players actually put heavier strings on their acoustics and RAISE the action, so the guitar projects loud and clean, with good tight bass.

With the action too low, you'll get some mud along with low output, even with the correct gauge string set on the guitar.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 24, 2014,
#19
Quote by Captaincranky
If the bridge has individual saddles, (most electrics do), you could always swap the saddles out between the E-6, and the A-5, and see if the A-5 starts breaking and/or the E-6 stops breaking.



this is brilliant!!!