#1
When you are listening to a piece of music, how many voices/melodic lines are you able to hear and follow along with? Just the bass? Just the Soprano? How about Soprano and an inner voice together?

Or even static harmony, how many voices can you hear through clearly and not just listening to the overall "effect" of the chord?
Last edited by Unreal T at Aug 24, 2014,
#2
My ears were better 20 years ago. I can usually hear 3 part harmony pretty well. One of my jazzbo friends can regularly pick out 6 different parts or chord voices. Amazing.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
i can figure out the chord progressions pretty easily and the soprano and bassline
i have alot of trouble with inner voices and since i damaged my ear its been getting more difficult
#4
It depends on how busy the parts are, normally i can follow the bass, melody and harmony pretty well. But if more than one part becomes very busy then i am having some problems, and have to slow it down.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#5
My hearing isn't really that good, I'm nearly deaf in one ear, but my good ear is just average, lol.

I can take what I hear in my head though and play it on guitar.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#6
i have 50% hearing in my left ear and my ear is improving considerably...I used to think hearing chords/voices/notes was a natural gift. But by focusing on improving, by playing along with all different types of songs and working hard to transcribe what I'm hearing onto the guitar, I'v made a significant improvement in the last few months of doing so. It's frustrating at times, but I now believe I will be able to pick up on whatever I hear as long as I continue to work.
#7
My ear is good and I have no problems with that anymore, though there's always room for improvement.

However, I can't sight read! That is really frustrating me right now. I want to be able to sight read piano pieces, but I can't. I can read relatively well (due to writing music with notation for over half a year now) but not nearly well enough to play it on the spot. I guess I just need to specifically practice sight reading a lot.

Especially rhythms are a problem. Dotted and beamed notes just slap me in the face
Last edited by Elintasokas at Aug 26, 2014,
#8
I can follow 2-3 voices reasonably well.

My hearing is fine around the fundamental frequencies, but tails off above 9 kHz and has a severe drop above 15kHz. It means I can't hear certain types of distortion and I must ask my 14-year younger wife to listen for it in my recordings.
#9
I don't understand how following the voices has anything to do with your ear being good. I think it has more to do with gear than ear. Unless you mean in a live context?
#10
Quote by Elintasokas
My ear is good and I have no problems with that anymore, though there's always room for improvement.

However, I can't sight read! That is really frustrating me right now. I want to be able to sight read piano pieces, but I can't. I can read relatively well (due to writing music with notation for over half a year now) but not nearly well enough to play it on the spot. I guess I just need to specifically practice sight reading a lot.

Especially rhythms are a problem. Dotted and beamed notes just slap me in the face


I can sight read rhythm perfectly, but by the time I read the notes 4 bars have passed. Guitar notation programs taught me tab under standard notation and that's all I know now
#11
they're okay, im not the best at transcribing but I can pass my ear training classes at least
Quote by Elintasokas
My ear is good and I have no problems with that anymore, though there's always room for improvement.

However, I can't sight read! That is really frustrating me right now. I want to be able to sight read piano pieces, but I can't. I can read relatively well (due to writing music with notation for over half a year now) but not nearly well enough to play it on the spot. I guess I just need to specifically practice sight reading a lot.

Especially rhythms are a problem. Dotted and beamed notes just slap me in the face

sight reading is a pain in the ass.
i sometimes practice with band in a box as it shows the melody while its playing. i guess that's cheating a bit to play along with the melody, but things can get discouraging when you are starting to read notation and all the rhythms make no sense

i can sight read tunes from the Real Book, but I have no idea how pianists can read those extremely complex classical pieces.
#12
Here is a nice little film piece to listen to. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxPJa11Zw4M

This is the sort of think I am talking about. To the untrained ear ( the general audience ), this track will sound more like an effect for the film. But to the trained ear, it will be more interesting.

What do you hear in this piece? Feel free to denote the time slot and what elements of music you hear going on.

The melodies are pretty easy to follow in this piece. What I like about it is the catchy thematic melody lines and how other voices come in to complement and imitate.
Last edited by Unreal T at Aug 26, 2014,
#13
Here's what I hear
0:12 Two lines: Violins doing tremolos with a tinkly instrument (forgotten what they're called, Glockenspiel?)
0:21 Four lines: The addition of a Trombone section laying out pads, with a choir singing major arpeggios.
0:30 Addition of Cello and Viola parts, and a clarinet (actually it's too bright so probably an oboe), and a harp

and that's all I've listened up to. I have a data limit.

Well I did a bit more , I love that part in 1:10 where it alternates between, oboe with piano, clarinet with piano and flute with piano duos.

So how do you know how the "general audience" listens? Isn't that a huge problem with us composers for not being able to predict how an audience hears things?
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Aug 27, 2014,
#14
Quote by GoldenGuitar
I don't understand how following the voices has anything to do with your ear being good. I think it has more to do with gear than ear. Unless you mean in a live context?


It doesn't. I was answering two separate questions: "how good is your ear" and "how good are your ears".
#15
Quote by SuperKid
they're okay, im not the best at transcribing but I can pass my ear training classes at least

sight reading is a pain in the ass.
i sometimes practice with band in a box as it shows the melody while its playing. i guess that's cheating a bit to play along with the melody, but things can get discouraging when you are starting to read notation and all the rhythms make no sense

i can sight read tunes from the Real Book, but I have no idea how pianists can read those extremely complex classical pieces.

Yeah, but they are somewhat dedicated to that. After all they are PIANISTS.

To me, playing piano (and sight reading intervals really fast) is just something I pretty much have to do, because I want to be a composer. I analyze every single note I learn. At least I also learn to compose piano music along the way and all kinds of techniques.

I find rhythms aren't that hard if you just practice a little. This software "Practica Musica" has been really useful for me in learning to count rhythms. It has stuff like rhythm tapping exercises in different meters, etc. The software is sometimes buggy and looks a bit outdated, but I have to admit it has been really useful in my music studies.

Same goes for Counterpointer, also by Ars Nova.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Aug 27, 2014,