#1

It has a baked maple fingerboard.
The guitar was stored for a while and when I finally got a chance to play it again, the fingerboard was really dry and a little sticky.
Any ideas on what I can do to hydrate it and keep it hydrated?
If it matters my model was built in 2008.
#2
I reckon you could just use some (dunlop) lemon oil to hydrate the fretboard.
After some doing some searching on the internet, it seems to work fine on/do no harm to baked maple.

Alternatively, you could just wipe it down with a damp cloth like you would with a normal maple neck. This will probably remove some of the stickiness.
#4
"Baked" maple is different from ordinary maple in that they're not putting a finish on it (they claim it doesn't need one due to the baking process). Unfortunately, maple doesn't have the natural oils in it that rosewood and ebony do. Only time will tell if that's a problem with these guitars. But there's no reason not to use mineral oil on it in exactly the same way that you do with rosewood/ebony. Wipe a very small amount on, wait a few minutes, wipe it off. As with rosewood, you do NOT let it "soak in," etc.

BTW, Dunlop lemon oil is ordinary mineral oil with a bit of cleaning solvent added (same as the lemon oil furniture polish, which usually has no lemon at all, by the way), put into a small bottle and charged more for <G>. If you need to clean gunk off the fretboard, use naptha (available at your local hardware store or as ronsonol lighter fluid) and then follow up with mineral oil (usually around $11-14 a gallon at the hardware store). There's also that Fret Doctor guy with the pseudo-science that claims that his oil concoction is better (so he's charging $12-15 per OUNCE). Multiply what he charges per ounce by 128 ounces per gallon and make a decision on whether you want to help put his kids through school. Driving Beemers.
#5
Quote by dspellman
"Baked" maple is different from ordinary maple in that they're not putting a finish on it (they claim it doesn't need one due to the baking process). Unfortunately, maple doesn't have the natural oils in it that rosewood and ebony do. Only time will tell if that's a problem with these guitars. But there's no reason not to use mineral oil on it in exactly the same way that you do with rosewood/ebony. Wipe a very small amount on, wait a few minutes, wipe it off. As with rosewood, you do NOT let it "soak in," etc.

BTW, Dunlop lemon oil is ordinary mineral oil with a bit of cleaning solvent added (same as the lemon oil furniture polish, which usually has no lemon at all, by the way), put into a small bottle and charged more for <G>. If you need to clean gunk off the fretboard, use naptha (available at your local hardware store or as ronsonol lighter fluid) and then follow up with mineral oil (usually around $11-14 a gallon at the hardware store). There's also that Fret Doctor guy with the pseudo-science that claims that his oil concoction is better (so he's charging $12-15 per OUNCE). Multiply what he charges per ounce by 128 ounces per gallon and make a decision on whether you want to help put his kids through school. Driving Beemers.

Thanks for the info!
I have the Dunlop lemon oil, but the label says not to use it on maple fretboards so I've been reluctant to try it. As for the mineral oil, will any generic mineral oil do it?
#6
Quote by IbanezGSA
Thanks for the info!
I have the Dunlop lemon oil, but the label says not to use it on maple fretboards so I've been reluctant to try it. As for the mineral oil, will any generic mineral oil do it?


I believe they say not to use it on maple fretboards because most maple boards are finished like the rest of the neck/body. Therefore, the lemon oil wouldn't help hydrate it at all, and very well might damage the finish. Your guitar is special though, with unfinished maple, so it should handle it just fine, like rosewood or ebony would.
#7
Quote by the_bi99man
I believe they say not to use it on maple fretboards because most maple boards are finished like the rest of the neck/body. Therefore, the lemon oil wouldn't help hydrate it at all, and very well might damage the finish. Your guitar is special though, with unfinished maple, so it should handle it just fine, like rosewood or ebony would.

Makes sense.
Then the next question is: lemon oil or mineral oil?
#8
I really need to start oiling my fretboard, when I change strings I Usually give it a quid clean with furniture police, don't know if thats bad, but it brings it up nice.
#10
Quote by conanwarrior
I really need to start oiling my fretboard, when I change strings I Usually give it a quid clean with furniture police, don't know if thats bad, but it brings it up nice.


No reason to do much more than that. Rosewood and Ebony really have all the oils they need and don't need to have "vital oils replenished" or anything like that. You can leave the things for 50 years and they won't be any worse for never having been oiled.

You use oil for two reasons. One is cosmetic (it looks nicer if they don't look sort of dry) and the other is to block moisture in liquid form (specifically sweat and the fats/acids/salts that come with it) from getting into the fretboard. I usually take the time to clean the guitar well and oil the fretboard when I restring.
#11
Quote by IbanezGSA
Makes sense.
Then the next question is: lemon oil or mineral oil?


Lemon oil—at least for instruments—is just mineral oil with a fragrance. Just buy your mineral oil at a drug store.

When you oil the fretboard go easy. Use only small dab soaked into a cloth and then touch up dry spots carefully. Baked maple will suck oil up and then leach a sticky mess out for weeks if you use too much. I only use Gorgomyte on my baked maple LP; that way I can get the board clean and keep the color even without having to worry about using too much.
#12
Quote by jinsu2301
Try some Fast Fret.


^This! It works great on Rosewood fretboards, and should slick up that baked maple fretboard just fine.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#13
Quote by FatalGear41
^This! It works great on Rosewood fretboards, and should slick up that baked maple fretboard just fine.


Fast Fret, like most string lubes, is just mineral oil and fragrance. Given how little comes in a package it’s a very expensive way to clean a fretboard.
#14
Quote by IbanezGSA

Any ideas on what I can do to hydrate it and keep it hydrated?


BTW, you don't "hydrate" your fretboards -- you're specifically looking to minimize moisture as a liquid from getting to your fretboard (causes dry rot). Thus the mineral oil and/or the oily fretboard woods like rosewood/ebony.

You do, however, humidify your guitars (keeping them somewhere with about a 50% humidity level is ideal). Too much or too little humidity in either direction can cause you some problems.
#16
Alright guys, I bought some mineral oil. I'll restring and apply it and all that and let you know how it turns out.