#1
Hi,

I am thinking of buying new guitar(s). I haven't decided which yet but at this moment I am considering American Deluxe Strat.

The thing is whatever I finally decide to get I won't probably actually buy that right now. In fact it might be a while.

I was wondering how long usually a particular guitar is produced. I know American Standard and models like that will always stay. But can you assess or correctly predict how long a little obscure guitar, a particular colour or feature or one guitar that has the right combination I want might continue to get produced?

Hope the question is clear.

Thanks
#2
It's gonna vary wildly from brand to brand, even from model to model. If you're looking at the American Deluxe, that should be consistent for a very long time. Aside from yearly color options, everything else should either stay the same or get upgraded with something better.
#3
As far as I know, there is no guideline as to how long to keep a model running. A brand might introduce a model and take it out of production at a scheduled date, but once it becomes a part of the lineup, it probably stays until it stops selling, until the manufacturers decide to replace it with something, or for whatever reason they see fit.
#4
i am not sure how you would think we know, lol.

however to save a few bucks and get something more exotic or better, (AVRI) check out this site guitarsandeffects.com i bought two really nice teles for a really good price. i haven't ever had an issue.

reverb.com may be good too, although i haven't purchased anything from them. but i stalk their deals.
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#5
Thing about the Fender American Deluxe guitars,Fender use them to try out new ideas,Things like S1 switching,Compound radius fretboards,locking tuners,different colour schemes etc.Things that don't usually feature on the American Standards.So the American Deluxes are constantly evolving at a quicker rate than the American Standards which will take some new ideas on.I think the American Deluxes are kind of experimental.If you leave it too long for an Am Deluxe with certain features that you like,You may have to go pre-owned unless you can find somewhere with some old stock left over.
#6
Thanks everyone.

So, the bottom line is if you like something you have to buy it now otherwise it might not be available when you have the money at a later time.
#7
Quote by saqib09
But can you assess or correctly predict how long a little obscure guitar, a particular colour or feature or one guitar that has the right combination I want might continue to get produced?


Nope.

Carvin normally made 24.75" scale necks with 24 frets on its neck-through guitars in the late '80's. In 1991 it decided to build a neck-through strat-bodied guitar with a 25.5" scale and 22 frets. But the Carvin customer was very much into the speed burner shredder guitar at the time, and the 25.5" scale guitars failed miserably. SO badly, in fact, that they were cancelled in under a year. Some of the neck blanks remained, however, and Carvin used a couple with other bodies. I ended up with one of those.

Gibson built the solid body ES-335S essentially for just one year around 1980 or so (the catalog carried it longer). Same deal, essentially, with the ES-335-12 in 1967 (I've got one of those, and the solid body version is on my list). Both have been reissued, strangely, in the last year or two, in downgraded versions. Gibson tried what they called a "pilot" program of 35 guitars (though my sources say more) of the Neal Schon signature guitar, but never produced any more, even though the originals sold immediately at the hefty MSRP of $10K.
#8
Quote by dspellman
Nope.

Carvin normally made 24.75" scale necks with 24 frets on its neck-through guitars in the late '80's. In 1991 it decided to build a neck-through strat-bodied guitar with a 25.5" scale and 22 frets. But the Carvin customer was very much into the speed burner shredder guitar at the time, and the 25.5" scale guitars failed miserably. SO badly, in fact, that they were cancelled in under a year. Some of the neck blanks remained, however, and Carvin used a couple with other bodies. I ended up with one of those.

Gibson built the solid body ES-335S essentially for just one year around 1980 or so (the catalog carried it longer). Same deal, essentially, with the ES-335-12 in 1967 (I've got one of those, and the solid body version is on my list). Both have been reissued, strangely, in the last year or two, in downgraded versions. Gibson tried what they called a "pilot" program of 35 guitars (though my sources say more) of the Neal Schon signature guitar, but never produced any more, even though the originals sold immediately at the hefty MSRP of $10K.


Thanks. I wish businesses were more customer oriented and less about profit maximizing. Wishful thinking. Of course, they have to make profit and that's ok. But... you know what I mean.
#9
it varies

the american deluxe series has been around for some time (at least 10 years), so it's a fair bet (though not guaranteed) that it'll continue, at least in some shape or form, almost indefinitely. However, if the current range has a very specific specification that you want, or a certain colour which you love, then I'd try to get it sooner rather than later because even if the model remains, colours change very frequently (sometimes every year) and even the specs, though they don't change as often, can change every so often when a company updates a model.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
it varies

the american deluxe series has been around for some time (at least 10 years), so it's a fair bet (though not guaranteed) that it'll continue, at least in some shape or form, almost indefinitely. However, if the current range has a very specific specification that you want, or a certain colour which you love, then I'd try to get it sooner rather than later because even if the model remains, colours change very frequently (sometimes every year) and even the specs, though they don't change as often, can change every so often when a company updates a model.


Thanks, makes sense and very helpful answer. 1 year is a pretty safe bet, do you think? I would definitely get it soon but there is the added complexity of arranging a shipment. I will go through the trouble and the shitty long process but even then the real problem is you end up paying more for the shipping than the price of the guitar. Ridiculous situation. Thanks again.
#11
1 year is probably pretty safe, and it is also possible to D&D what is called NOS (new old stock) guitars for many years after a model has ceased production.

NOS guitars are essentially guitars made years ago but still unsold. Some stuff just simply sits on shelves for one reason or another. For example, I found NOS Godin Velocity HSS Superstrats- discontinued in 2011- on sale at Guitar Center and other retailers in late 2013. That same year, I narrowly missed out on the purchase of this NOS 2008 Reverend Roundhouse RT.
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Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Aug 29, 2014,
#12
No problem Yeah 1 year is probably ok, as long as you're not unlucky and Fender isn't like 6 weeks away from making an update What I mean is, although you might say, "Fender only changes its colours once every year" [for example, I don't know exactly how often they do it], that doesn't mean you necessarily have one year until the specs change, if it's been, say, 11 months since the last change.

^ Good point about NOS as well. You can normally find NOS examples for at least a few months after things have been discontinued. You often get better prices, too.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Aug 29, 2014,
#13
Quote by dannyalcatraz
1 year is probably pretty safe, and it is also possible to D&D what is called NOS (new old stock) guitars for many years after a model has ceased production.

NOS guitars are essentially guitars made years ago but still unsold. Some stuff just simply sits on shelves for one reason or another. For example, I found NOS Godin Velocity HSS Superstrats- discontinued in 2011- on sale at Guitar Center and other retailers in late 2013. That same year, I narrowly missed out on the purchase of this NOS 2008 Reverend Roundhouse RT.


Thanks, very helpful again.

And that Reverend ... wow....Even though that is not the type of colour and texture I like I have to admit that its quite extraordinary.
#14
Yeah, I'm not usually one for a metal flake sparkle, but Reverend is one of the few companies that makes them right, IMHO. My first Reverend was a gold metal flake Flatroc, and because of a fellow happy Rev-buying UGer, it remains my ONLY metal flake sparkle guitar.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!