#1
Hey guys.

Haven't been here in awhile, sup?

Anyways, I haven't practiced seriously in probably well over a year, and the bug just bit me again. So I'm wondering, does anyone have any tips on practice? I see you guys ask for goals in these kinds of threads so here goes.

To be able to write music I like. This is number one for me by far. I really love bands like Opeth with long beautiful progressions and haunting solos. Porcupine Tree as well has some great tunes. Any tips you could give me to understand the process of making this kind of music would be great.

Technique. I don't find technique particularly interesting, but I also don't want to be limited if a fast or complex melody pops into my head. I've been doing some of Steve Vai's ten hour workout to a metronome over the past week, and it;s doing me pretty well. Anything else I should be doing?

Ear Training. This is probably where I've fallen the most short when I used to practice regularely, so I'm gonna hit it like a truck lol. I there anything I should be doing other than learning tunes by ear? and can anyone suggest some songs (preferably prog that would be good for a beginner?


Thank you very much for reading this wall of text.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#2
Quote by The_Sophist
Hey guys.

Haven't been here in awhile, sup?

Anyways, I haven't practiced seriously in probably well over a year, and the bug just bit me again. So I'm wondering, does anyone have any tips on practice? I see you guys ask for goals in these kinds of threads so here goes.

To be able to write music I like. This is number one for me by far. I really love bands like Opeth with long beautiful progressions and haunting solos. Porcupine Tree as well has some great tunes. Any tips you could give me to understand the process of making this kind of music would be great.

Technique. I don't find technique particularly interesting, but I also don't want to be limited if a fast or complex melody pops into my head. I've been doing some of Steve Vai's ten hour workout to a metronome over the past week, and it;s doing me pretty well. Anything else I should be doing?

Ear Training. This is probably where I've fallen the most short when I used to practice regularely, so I'm gonna hit it like a truck lol. I there anything I should be doing other than learning tunes by ear? and can anyone suggest some songs (preferably prog that would be good for a beginner?


Thank you very much for reading this wall of text.


I like Opeth and Porcupine Tree as well, but really the only thing I can tell you is to learn and analyze songs that you like and figure out what makes them so great to you. You can incorporate that into ear training as well if you learn them by ear.

I would say most prog isn't too well suited for beginners at ear training, though anything's possible, it just may take longer to figure out. You might want to try something like Pictures of a City or 21st Century Schizoid Man by King Crimson, as well as maybe some Jethro Tull. Really, I don't think anything off of In Absentia should be too hard. Most of Opeth's heavy songs aren't that bad. Basically just choose songs that sound like they wouldn't be too terribly difficult to figure out so that you don't get stuck pounding your head against a wall.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Aug 30, 2014,
#3
On top of all your practice just write. Your first few songs will probably be really crappy but you will also learn a lot from doing them. By your 5th song or so you should have a good grasp of the direction you are trying to go and at the same time your songs will start sounding a lot better because the practice will start paying off. Just don't be discouraged if your first few attempts don't live up to Opeth standards. These pro musos have been doing this for years and it is their life so go easy on yourself so that this bug that has bitten you stays for years to come
#4
in order to compose you should:

1) start learning songs and solos by ear. Start with something simple, like blues/rock and work your way up to metal. Early Sabbath is very accessible. This a laborious process but it's vital.

2) start composing riffs now - never stop - keep working at inventing and improvising. learn to record yourself as well.

3) learn some basic theory ( chord progression naming II, V., I )etc.
#5
Remember that if you want to stay inspired, don't just turn everything into a boring exercise. Listen to your favorite music/musicians, etc. That always makes me go "Damn, I really need to learn to play like this guy!" and I am again motivated to practice
#6
As far as eartraining goes, I recommend singing the intervals of the major and minor scale. I still do this almost everyday.