#1
Hello,

The question is in the title of the thread...

Are the effects loops in the Bugera 1990 infinium and 333 infinium serial or parallel?

Can't seem to find the information anywhere.

Cheers.
#2
Judging from the back, the 1990's is serial and the 333's is parallel.
I'm not really sure about the former, but the latter's parallel for sure.
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#3
Quote by Spambot_2
Judging from the back, the 1990's is serial and the 333's is parallel.
I'm not really sure about the former, but the latter's parallel for sure.


Thanks mate. Much appreciated.

The reason I asked was to do with using a noise gate. And is it right that a noise gate doesn't work in a parallel effects loop?
#4
You need to understand what parallel and serial mean.

Two things in parallel will share incoming signal, and will deliver the signal to the same thing.
Something in series with another receives a signal, processes it, then passes it on through the second thing, which processes it and then passes it on to whatever.

Examples of a parallel circuit are, for example, in delay and reverb pedals - the dry guitar signal gets fed to the fx processor AND passed it on to the output, and then the fx processor also passes it on to the output, so the fx processor is in parallel with the dry signal path, and you regulate how much of the processed signal gets mixed with the rest with the "mix" knob, with 50% being an equal amount of the two signals, 0% the dry signal only and 100% wet signal only.

Examples of a serial circuit are, for example, in distortion pedals - your signal goes in, gets distorted, and then only the distorted signal gets out.

In amps' parallel fx loops you will have a mix knob as well, or return level, such as the one on the 333, that you can use to decide how much of the signal processed by the pedals in your fx loop returns to the amp.

Maxing that knob makes all of the processed signal go on through the amp, effectively making that loop act as a serial fx loop.

You can use a noise gate in a parallel fx loop, only in that case you might wanna make sure the mix knob is max'd, so you'd be fine with both amps, really.

Also if your noise gate has a send/return option, you may wanna have a look at the 4 cable method.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
^ Ideally that is true. But I've found that most parallel loops (and loops in general) are designed like shit and never really have a 100% wet setting, even with the mix knob maxed.

Parallel loops to me have always been like a cool idea, that never work in execution and always just cause problems and annoyances. Until you actually start getting to amps with good and thoughtful design ($2500+ range).
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#6
Quote by Spambot_2
You need to understand what parallel and serial mean.

Two things in parallel will share incoming signal, and will deliver the signal to the same thing.
Something in series with another receives a signal, processes it, then passes it on through the second thing, which processes it and then passes it on to whatever.

Examples of a parallel circuit are, for example, in delay and reverb pedals - the dry guitar signal gets fed to the fx processor AND passed it on to the output, and then the fx processor also passes it on to the output, so the fx processor is in parallel with the dry signal path, and you regulate how much of the processed signal gets mixed with the rest with the "mix" knob, with 50% being an equal amount of the two signals, 0% the dry signal only and 100% wet signal only.

Examples of a serial circuit are, for example, in distortion pedals - your signal goes in, gets distorted, and then only the distorted signal gets out.

In amps' parallel fx loops you will have a mix knob as well, or return level, such as the one on the 333, that you can use to decide how much of the signal processed by the pedals in your fx loop returns to the amp.

Maxing that knob makes all of the processed signal go on through the amp, effectively making that loop act as a serial fx loop.

You can use a noise gate in a parallel fx loop, only in that case you might wanna make sure the mix knob is max'd, so you'd be fine with both amps, really.

Also if your noise gate has a send/return option, you may wanna have a look at the 4 cable method.


Cool. That's very helpful. So, thank you very much.

Just to clarify, when using a noise gate, with the 333, you say to have the 'mix' knob maxed. Would that be both 'send' and 'return knobs? Or just 'return'?

Cheers.
#7
Just the return one.

The send knob is simply an output level control for the fx send.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#8
Quote by Offworld92
^ Ideally that is true. But I've found that most parallel loops (and loops in general) are designed like shit and never really have a 100% wet setting, even with the mix knob maxed.

Parallel loops to me have always been like a cool idea, that never work in execution and always just cause problems and annoyances. Until you actually start getting to amps with good and thoughtful design ($2500+ range).


My JVM has both and ad Offworld had said, the parallel never gets to 100% wet.

And as for the thoughtful design part... I agree. except the JVM would have been so much better if the serial loop had been before the parallel. For the sole reason that running a gate in the serial loop will cut any delay/reverb style effects in the parallel loop. and seing as its the amp itself is pretty noisy its quite aggravating.


EDIT: Why bugera? do you need something to heat your house up? cos i hear they make heaters nowadays. No need to set the whole place alight...
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Last edited by loki_lulamen at Sep 2, 2014,