#1
Hey there, I broke the first string (smallest string) on a new Floyd Rose guitar while tuning from E Drop D to E Standard. I was almost done tuning it, I had gotten to the final string, and "ping". It snapped at the headstock. The floating bridge was tilting pretty far towards to head of the guitar. Should I have leveled the bridge by loosening the springs in the back of the guitar first?

I'm relatively new to Floyd Rose so maybe I was unaware of how to properly tune it to begin with. Can someone enlighten me on why it broke?

Other info: Strings used are Ernie Ball Regular Slinky, (.010-.046).
Method of tuning to BOTH E Drop D and E Standard was starting with Low E > A > Low E > A > D > Low E > A > D > G etc etc.

Also another thing that's eating away at me is, can it cause damage to the bridge if there's too much tension on either the strings or springs?
Last edited by AnythingHere at Sep 1, 2014,
#2
Can you pull up(the opposite of diving) on the strings? If you can, then you shouldn't be changing tunings. It really messes with the tuning of the other strings.

On the other hand, if you can't pull up, I suggest you get the EVH D-Tuna if you can afford it. It tunes your low E to D without you having to retune everything else.

To answer your first question, it could possibly be burrs on either the saddles or the nut but the most probable cause is old/worn out strings. You could fix it(the burrs) yourself with some sandpaper like I do or, if you're afraid you might damage your guitar, bring it to a tech/the place you purchased it.

If there was too much tension on the strings or springs, you would know. The bridge would rise off of the body(high string tension, low spring tension) or sink into the body(high spring tension, low string tension). Your bridge/strings/guitar neck should be fine as long as you're not playing at G standard or higher.
#3
Sorry darrenram1. I didn't really understand like any of that. haha. It's a brand new guitar, but are you saying its been sitting in storage for so long that the strings are just sorta weak?

Also, so are you saying there isn't a possibility that too much spring or string tension can damage the bridge? Because its been tilting for a while now.. I haven't gotten around to adjusting the springs yet.
Last edited by AnythingHere at Aug 31, 2014,
#4
Quote by AnythingHere
It's a brand new guitar, but are you saying its been sitting in storage for so long that the strings are just sorta weak?


Kind of. What I've noticed is that strings start to corrode after ~1.5-2 weeks. Did you change the strings when you bought the guitar? If not, you should have. I assume you're a beginner so a word of advice. When a single string breaks, it usually means that the whole set is weak and should be replaced as soon as possible.

Quote by AnythingHere
Also, so are you saying there isn't a possibility that too much spring or string tension can damage the bridge? Because its been tilting for a while now.. I haven't gotten around to adjusting the springs yet.


The tilt from a single snapped string isn't going to damage anything in any way but I would loosen the other strings just for some peace of mind.
#5
Quote by darrenram1
Kind of. What I've noticed is that strings start to corrode after ~1.5-2 weeks. Did you change the strings when you bought the guitar? If not, you should have. I assume you're a beginner so a word of advice. When a single string breaks, it usually means that the whole set is weak and should be replaced as soon as possible.

The tilt from a single snapped string isn't going to damage anything in any way but I would loosen the other strings just for some peace of mind.


If un-coated strings lasted 2 weeks that would be great, unfortunately that is not the case. I get 3-5 hours before un-coated strings start to erode and soon after (8-12 hours of playtime) become harder to play on.

I would completely disagree with you saying that a whole set is weak because one string broke, that really makes absolutely no sense to me. These things are mass produced by machines in factories where that isn't really a possibility.

A floyd rose bridge should be level with the body. Take the guitar to a luthier and have it setup and you will be good o go.
#6
You should trade it in for a guitar without a Floyd.
To be brutally honest if you are asking this question here.
What the hell!!!
#7
No luthier, learn by trial and error how to work on your own guitars...watch videos and read, tons of great info out there..i hate those luthier rip off artists...

Im a auto mechanic at a GM dealership and i always encourage people to do their own work and never ever suggest something that isint needed...i know how the uninformed get ripped off so do your homework and fix em yourself...buy new strings..
#8
Quote by 260bpm
No luthier, learn by trial and error how to work on your own guitars...watch videos and read, tons of great info out there..i hate those luthier rip off artists...

Im a auto mechanic at a GM dealership and i always encourage people to do their own work and never ever suggest something that isint needed...i know how the uninformed get ripped off so do your homework and fix em yourself...buy new strings..


Assuming this is his/her only guitar, I wouldn't suggest DIY for a complete beginner.
I love DIY (for everything) and always do whatever I can before paying an expert, but its pretty easy to screw up a guitar when you don't have the slightest clue what your doing (been there done that).
#9
yes your right JGM, dont practice on a good guitar or your only one..i love DIY also