#1
I have been after my perfect tone for years and I have yet to find it. I use to play an Ibanez RGR 320SP with Mick Thomson's AHB-3s in it but now I have an 06' Gibson Explorer with 81 and 85 EMGs. The gear I have at my disposal is my Boss NS-2 Suppressor, Maxon OD808 Overdrive, MXR Compressor, Electro Harmonix's Metal Muff with top boost, and my Line 6 Spider IV amp. The music I play is generally Dethklok and Slipknot and for about 7 years now I have yet to discover how they have such tight distortion. The sound is heavy but there's no bleed through from other strings and they're able to pull of pinch harmonics like it's no problem. I have found settings where only few are able to come through never all at once. I would love some advice as to how to get the best tone for me
#2
Quote by alex.boldin
The sound is heavy but there's no bleed through from other strings and they're able to pull of pinch harmonics like it's no problem.

That sounds like a technique rather than tone problem I'm afraid.
#3
I don't want to jump to conclusions, but as far as I know, the Spider is not a very good amp in terms of sound. It seems to me that the rest of your gear is generally above it in terms of quality.
#4
Quote by Arron_Zacx
That sounds like a technique rather than tone problem I'm afraid.

I've considered that alot, Im not the guy who thinks that I'm amazing. I need help pinpointing the tonal side of the music I'm trying to play. Harmonics come through like a dream on some presets but if i have my pedals on they don't exist. I cannot find the inbetween where i have a thick metal sound and can get a clean harmonic and play on he higher end without bleed through. My old guitar teacher didn't know anything about this side of music and could never help
#5
Quote by TheLiberation
I don't want to jump to conclusions, but as far as I know, the Spider is not a very good amp in terms of sound. It seems to me that the rest of your gear is generally above it in terms of quality.

Most of the time I have it on clean with my metal muff hooked up.
#6
Modeling amps sound horrible with distortion pedals hooked up to them, even if you have it on clean.
#7
Truthfully, the only way you will get an improvement in tone is with an amp upgrade.
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#8
This amp isn't even a year old. A have an Ibanez TBX65R back at home. I don't know if that is much of an upgrade or downgrade. I'm dorming in college, I don't play gigs or anything just a dumbass kid that loves metal. What would you all suggest for an amp?
#9
I use a Line 6. I would never expect to find my dream tone with it. I'll worry about that when I get a tube amp and actually throw some money down.
"This one is machine and nerve, and has its mind concluded
This one is but flesh and faith, and is the more deluded."
#10
Quote by alex.boldin
I have been after my perfect tone for years and I have yet to find it. I use to play an Ibanez RGR 320SP with Mick Thomson's AHB-3s in it but now I have an 06' Gibson Explorer with 81 and 85 EMGs. The gear I have at my disposal is my Boss NS-2 Suppressor, Maxon OD808 Overdrive, MXR Compressor, Electro Harmonix's Metal Muff with top boost, and my Line 6 Spider IV amp. The music I play is generally Dethklok and Slipknot and for about 7 years now I have yet to discover how they have such tight distortion. The sound is heavy but there's no bleed through from other strings and they're able to pull of pinch harmonics like it's no problem. I have found settings where only few are able to come through never all at once. I would love some advice as to how to get the best tone for me



I've played with some very talented guitarists over the years, and they didn't need any of the equipment you listed.

Tone, is all about technique, my friend.

And, hard work and practice.
#11
Let me just say, I've tried the metal muff and it sounds really harsh. You should ditch that and the line 6 spider to get an amp with a good drive built in and then boost it. I had the line 6 as a practice amp for a long time and figured that the crunch channel is the best sounding one, but it doesn't have as much drive as the other channels, you can try boosting it (I never tried it). The other channels sound like they have no presence whatsoever, and let me just say maxing out the gain in the amp isn't always the best idea.

As far as getting a new amp, check out Orange, Peavey, Jet City, and Marshall amps.
#12
Quote by Metalmann67
Tone, is all about technique, my friend.

I have to disagree, it isn't all about technique. This is a misguided exaggeration.
#13
Quote by alex.boldin
The music I play is generally Dethklok and Slipknot and for about 7 years now I have yet to discover how they have such tight distortion.

Son, it's about time you buy a 5150/6505.

That's some of the meanest, tightest distortion you can get without spending $999+
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ESP E-II M-1
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PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#14
Shout out for Mesa, they make great amps and the distortion might be what you're looking for (those Rectifiers).

And for the string bleeding and harmonics, just practice doing them. Try different muting methods and different ways to do those harmonics, you'll get it eventually
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#15
Im to the point where I practice without an amp all the time. The guys at my local guiatr center are dildos and they can't help with literally anything I've thrown at them over the years. I'll keep my eyes open for a good marshall amp. Thanks for all teh feedback people
#16
Quote by Metalmann67
I've played with some very talented guitarists over the years, and they didn't need any of the equipment you listed.

Tone, is all about technique, my friend.

And, hard work and practice.


Don't be silly.

A good guitarist can make nearly any setup sound good, but no amount of skill will ever make Fender Princeton sound like a Dual Rectifier. Tone comes from the gear, the quality of that tone comes from you.

Anyway.

Bleed is purely a technique issue. You need to practice muting the strings.

Harmonics: partly a technique issue partly a gear/tone issue. Some guitars are easier than others to get harmonics out of, having your guitar properly setup is really important since string buzz can kill a harmonic very quickly. Volume plays a huge factor. Louder makes it much easier. At quieter volumes you generally need to compensate with more gain or compression of some sort. Having the right EQ is also important. You need mids for harmonics, so if you scoop them you're SOL.

Tightness: Less gain, better technique. That heavy sound you hear in recordings has half as much distortion as you think. What you're hearing is 2-8 guitars all playing the same riff combined with bass and the kick. It's almost always the bass and drums that make the sound as heavy as it is not the guitars. You can compensate when you're playing at home by yourself by adding extra bass & turning up the gain, but that will just loosen the sound.

A new amp certainly wouldn't hurt either.
#17
Count me as another vote for "your tone is in your gear, your technique makes you good to hear" camp. There's a reason why guys like Eric Johnson are super-picky about their gear.

Save your money & get a quality amp to improve your tone. In the meantime, practice the techniques that are giving you fits, like the pinch harmonics.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
I know it's like comparing apples and oranges but I look at it like this: Gear gives you a certain sound, technique gives you a certain tone. Nuno Bettencourt once played through Eddie Van Halen's rig and said he still sounded like himself, not Eddie. So tone comes from the player's technique, not the gear. But you'll never a get a great tone from crap gear. And having the same gear as your idols will get you closer to their sound than not having it.

I've seen other people use sound and tone the opposite way, so I think that's where some confusion lies whenever these debates get started. Much like dannyalcatraz says tone and technique. We're saying the same thing, just with different words.
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#19
Nuno Bettencourt once played through Eddie Van Halen's rig and said he still sounded like himself, not Eddie.


He sounded like EVH doing a Nuno impression. The tone was Eddie's, the phrasing and techniques were Nuno's
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
When I saw Aerosmith a week ago, Joe Perry played a variety of axes, mostly Gibbys and Fenders, plus a pedal steel. Brad Whitford was more restrained in his weapons of choice.

While the phrasing, etc. never left any doubt as to who was playing what, their respective tones varied with each gear change.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#21
My gear is very similar to Alex Wade's, but I'll never sound like him. Not even if my gear is 100% exact.

Not that I'd want to anyways. Not a very usable tone outside of extreme metal genres and I don't tend to stick to one EQ setting for very long. I like to screw around with the tone.
Ibanez Prestige RG852MPB
Ibanez Prestige RG652KFX
ESP E-II M-1
LTD AW-7
Schecter Loomis NT
EVH 5150 III 50
PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#22
It's like Les Paul once said, "I can make ANY guitar sound like a Les Paul".


Or, not.
#23
For OP:

I've never really wanted to use the same tone for solo's and rhythm, usually need more reverb and delay on the lead if you want a good metal tone for a solo. Also, noise suppressor settings and sustain can mess up your sound across the board.

As far as the squealing goes, could be pickup adjustments or just the pickups in general. I don't know, but some guitars are just much easier to squeal on than others.

Your issue does partly sound like technique though, muting is very important to get a cleaner sound and help notes ring out individually.
Last edited by coderguy at Sep 1, 2014,