#1
Hello, newer to the forums and guitar, my question has anyone taken any of the Berklee courses? And how beneficial are they? I'm really interested in taking the music theory 101 course and was hoping I could gain some insight from people on here. Thanks in advance: Craig
#2
I haven't taken the the Berkley online course, but when I was in high school I took Music Theory 1 (101). I was somebody that briefly played clarinet for less than a year in 4th grade and picked up the guitar years later in high school, so I was never able to read sheet music but I figured out Tablature easily enough.

I would think there's enough resources out there to learn music theory without having to take the Berkley course you speak of (I'm assuming that's a course that you're required to pay for).

The course I took in high school had about 16 kids, and I was one of only 4 that wasn't in band... So all the kids knew how to read the sheet music already and therefore the class progressed very quickly. In fact, the teacher flat out told one kid that he should drop the class because he wasn't going to be able to keep up, while the other 3 of us struggled to maintain C's in the class :/

What is it exactly that you're hoping to achieve from a music theory course? Figuring out that answer might help lead finding some valuable (and free!) resources that could get you to where you'd like to be.

I'm by no means somebody that has extensive knowledge on music theory. Hell, I can barely read sheet music as it is. I'm simply just offering some guidance to possibly a different resource that may be of the same benefit to you =)
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#3
There are loads of free resources out there. But I guess if you can afford it, it might be of more help because it'd be consolodiated, organised, and prepared by people who have the proper credentials.
#4
I appreciate the responses, I have a teacher who comes in once a week I was hoping to dive a little deeper. I'm one of those has to know everything kinda guys. I just figured structured learning and a little more focused on all things theory would be beneficial.
#5
I'm a current Berklee student, actually. If you can afford it, I say go for it.
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#6
Quote by luckotdraw
I appreciate the responses, I have a teacher who comes in once a week I was hoping to dive a little deeper. I'm one of those has to know everything kinda guys. I just figured structured learning and a little more focused on all things theory would be beneficial.

While that's admirable, I don't know many guitarists whom know how to read sheet music. The common ground for reading music for a guitar is tablature...

That being said, to each his or her own, right?

As others have said, if you've got the money and you're looking to spend time to break down music theory in a controlled and structured environment, I would say go for it if that's what you're looking to do.

My recommendation, however, would definitely be to brush up on some beginner and introductory material before getting into this class. As I stated above, I was one of few that wasn't in any way familiar with sheet music/theory/etc, and I quickly fell behind in the class as a result.

Good luck to you!
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#7
The only trouble I have with depending on figuring things out online is I tend to get bogged down. Almost an information overload kind idea. The idea at least for me, is that a structured lesson plan would be beneficial. If I could find a system that could teach me and I didn't have to look up fragmented videos on you tube id be interested, even as a pre cursor to possibly taking the course. The trouble I am seeing is that theory lessons aren't nearly as popular as "Shredding 101" and finding the right system is key. I agree with all things stated above, however the idea of being a complete musician is more appealing to me then relying on tab only (not that reading tab only, is wrong or beneath me or makes any one less a musician). For me if I'm gonna do something it's going to be in the most complete way possible. Maybe I'm just a glutton for punishment lol. Again I appreciate all views and advice from all of you cheers.
#8
You seem like you have the patience for music theory so I say go for it. It helps you relate to other instruments and gives you a common ground to build on with any other players. There is no substiute for a live playing with other musicians but with a basic knowledge of theory you can understand so many other instuments that you may find yourself playing with in the future.