#1
Hello

I notice this chord used in purple haze:


----------
------8--
------7--
------6--
------7--
----------

At first i see a dominant 7th but the minor 3rd is confusing me, because first you have a major triad.

When I googled it, i see it called a E7add9, but shouldnt this be E7 add b9? Because isn't add 9 the major 2nd which in this case (root being E) the 8th note on b is a minor 3rd 9 (G).

OR am I confused by the naming convention ?
Last edited by thefollower at Sep 3, 2014,
#2
It's an E7#9 which means it has a raised 9, so the notes technically would be E (root), G# (3rd), D (dom7) and F## (raised 9). It seems weird at first but it's not a G. A regular E9 chord would include E, G#, D and F# but with the E7#9 Chord you simply raise the 9 by a step. Although on a guitar G and F## "are the same" they're somehow not sorry, I can't explain it better
#3
Wait two questions:

Explain F## not being the same as G (ive always wondered this with regarding bb7 chords but never found out).

Secondly how come the #9 works because it doesn't technically seem in key with the track ? Given its a dominant 7th chord, there is no #9 in mixolydian... so im a little confused what key/mode he playing around ?
#4
The blues has a tradition of mixing both major and minor thirds. This is a characteristic sound in a lot of blues.

Another characteristic of the blues is to use dom7 chords all over the place. The tonic is a dom7 the subdominant is a dom7 and the dominant is also a dom7

Hendrix developed his musical intuitions and style from the blues tradition. Consequently he developed a taste for the use of both major and minor thirds.

This particular chord is sometimes referred to as "the Hendrix chord". It is an E7#9

When naming a chord you name it as either major or minor which notates what kind of third you use. The E7 chord is an E major with a minor 7 (E G B D).

Hendrix adds a #9 to this E7 chord which for all intents and purposes you could consider a minor third (G). However, when we name a chord we use each scale degree only once for the sake of clarity.

If we call that note G then we would have to notate it as a minor third, but because we already have a major third G# in the chord this creates a dilemma. Instead we name it F## which against the root note of E is a raised second (or raised ninth) #9.

Thus we call it an E7#9. The pitch is the same whether we call it F## or G. But they are NOTATED differently. The sound is the same - the name is different.

...an easier way to think of it and probably a more accurate explanation would be if you consider writing it on a staff. You can't stack a chord on sheet music and have two notes on the same line in one chord and notate that one is sharp and one is natural. Thus the two notes must be notated on separate lines. One as a G# and one as a F##.

Hope that all makes sense.
Si
#5
This
Don't try to understand the song in one particular scale or key signature. It is what it is and it works because it sounds good. At the end of the day that's the only thing that matters in music. But 20tigers is right
#7
Quote by 20Tigers

When naming a chord you name it as either major or minor which notates what kind of third you use. The E7 chord is an E major with a minor 7 (E G B D).

Hendrix adds a #9 to this E7 chord which for all intents and purposes you could consider a minor third (G). However, when we name a chord we use each scale degree only once for the sake of clarity.


Isn't this like it is because it doesn't function like a minor third, but as a #9 because there is already a functioning third, which you can clearly hear, because it sounds like a dominant chord, rather than a minor chord with a diminished fourth. Or am I wrong? Is it just for clarity?
#8
Quote by liampje
Isn't this like it is because it doesn't function like a minor third, but as a #9 because there is already a functioning third, which you can clearly hear, because it sounds like a dominant chord, rather than a minor chord with a diminished fourth. Or am I wrong? Is it just for clarity?


He's just simplifying the explaination. The chord was already identified as an E7 before extentions