#1
Hello guys ,
i have spent around 70 hrs of practicing with a pick (metal string acoustic ),and now i started all over again with classical guitar (with a teacher) ,because i like the Spanish type of music and generally the finger style .
Now i suddenly have 100 questions.
Can you please recommend what to do ,to focus only on one type of guitar or i can learn both types simultaneously ,i am not in a hurry ,i know that this is a lifetime learning ,but i do not want to end up discouraged at the end.
Please share your experience and advices.

Thank you very much in advance.
#2
That's a hard call, and I will be interested in seeing what advice you get.

I've been playing for over 50 years, and I can see two different and better paths I could have taken than the one I have:

1) Get a good teacher and learn sight reading and deeper theory, that would have lead me into jazz, flamenco an/or latin.

2) Learn a wider range of playing skills than I have, ie include flatpicking and electric guitar.

All in all I think in the very long term I would have been better off with option 1, either for my own satisfaction of as a performer.
#3
I don't see anything wrong with learning on both but I think if you learn on a steel string acoustic, you will find the classical guitar much easier to play than vice versa. However, if you like Spanish/classical and fingerstyle the most then you might want to focus mainly on that, but you can learn fingerstyle on the steel string too.
#4
They are both "acoustic" guitars. One is a nylon-string, and one is a steel string.

The technique normally taught for classical playing is quite specific and disciplined, but it can be applied to playing fingerstyle on the steel string.
Flatpicking is quite a bit different, both in terms of technique and in the position the instrument is normally held.
Still...Many people play both, and more besides. The late Tommy Tedesco, a studio musician, used to have a huge packing case full of his instruments delivered to gigs...Several guitars, banjo, mandolin, uke, bouzuki....He could play 'em all.
#5
Quote by ante35
Hello guys ,
i have spent around 70 hrs of practicing with a pick (metal string acoustic ),and now i started all over again with classical guitar (with a teacher) ,because i like the Spanish type of music and generally the finger style .
Now i suddenly have 100 questions.
Can you please recommend what to do ,to focus only on one type of guitar or i can learn both types simultaneously ,i am not in a hurry ,i know that this is a lifetime learning ,but i do not want to end up discouraged at the end.
Please share your experience and advices.

Thank you very much in advance.


I've spent 20 years playing electric, acoustic and classical - I ended up playing exclusively fingerstyle on all three types of guitars after a while since the pick became a limitation and was a bit of a waste of time from a technique standpoint ( I'll still use one for certain styles for tone reasons). I spent many years playing Classical fingerstyle and electric with a pick - there's no real issue - your left hand improves regardless and your picking will improve as you get better at fingerstyle ( not sure why, but it does).

Fingerstyle is a big time commitment but it's worth the effort. With the exception of Bluegrass and Django style jazz, I can't think of any style that really benefits from using a pick on an acoustic versus fingerstyle.

The pick gives you a more staccato attack . Check out Jesse Cook for an example of a nylon string guitarist who mixes the use of a pick and fingerstyle throughout his songs. You get a different tone from the pick, which can suit certain situations.

It's easier to have faster scale playing speeds using a pick. Check out Paco Delucia, John Mclauglin and Al Diemola's concert ( it's on you tube) if you want to see some amazing players ( Al and John play with a pick, whereas Paco plays fingerstyle) - Paco can play as fast and he's playing fingerstyle! He is the fastest I've heard on nylon string - the ultimate virtuoso.