#1
Hi everyone, when I plug my headphones into my amp I only get sound through one ear. Is there a way to make the same sounds play through both speakers in my headphones as apposed to just one?
#3
First of all it's apparent that the connector you are using isn't meant to drive headphones. But if it's working well enough, then Roc's advice will work. What is the output you are using? Is it a "line out" or "speaker out". Is it a tube amp or a solid state amp?
#5
Quote by fly135
First of all it's apparent that the connector you are using isn't meant to drive headphones. But if it's working well enough, then Roc's advice will work. What is the output you are using? Is it a "line out" or "speaker out". Is it a tube amp or a solid state amp?


Hi, I have a VOX AC15VR it says "external speaker". Thanks.
#6
No don't do that. That's not meant for headphones.
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#7
^ well while that wouldn't be ideal, couldn't he just lower the volume a lot and use that?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
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#9
Do not do that...
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#10
So, can I just not use headphones at all with this amp?? The other output I have is "foot switch" no idea what that does...
#11
Thing is I'm moving to university pretty soon and obviously I can't play loudly with an amp in my dorm room so headphones are pretty much the only choice? Should I sell this one and get a new amp?
#12
There is no problem with doing that other than the possibility of blowing up your phones or your eardrums. It's a SS amp so the amp will tolerate the phones, which have a higher impedance than the speaker.
#13
Thank you! Just one small question what does impedance tell you about a speaker though, I know it has units of resistance but that's about it, thanks :P.
Last edited by benjaminhonan at Sep 5, 2014,
#14
Quote by benjaminhonan
Thing is I'm moving to university pretty soon and obviously I can't play loudly with an amp in my dorm room so headphones are pretty much the only choice? Should I sell this one and get a new amp?

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ESP E-II M-1
LTD AW-7
Schecter Loomis NT
EVH 5150 III 50
PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#15
Impedance is the resistance to electrical flow. A short has zero impedance. All amps require some resistance to flow to prevent the amp from overheating and failing. On a solid state amp such as yours the general rule is that any impedance higher than the recommended minimum impedance is ok. Tube amps are an exception because higher than recommended impedances can cause voltage buildup and electrical arcing internal to the amp.

The issue here is that the amp is probably capable of delivering voltages higher than the headphones can tolerate. That means if you accidentally have the output level too high you might fry the phones and/or your ears before you get a change to correct it. Typical headphone impedances are 16ohms and up. So that poses no problem to a SS amp that typically has a minimum load impedance of 4-8 ohms.
#16
Quote by Spambot_2
^ well while that wouldn't be ideal, couldn't he just lower the volume a lot and use that?


Yes actually this is fine - at the risk of frying phones and ears if turned up too far.

A local electronic boffin could soon knock up a suitable box or resistors to sort out a) a sensible load for the amp b) mono-two ear stereo and c) attenuation for the phones.
#17
Quote by Roc8995
Nope. Impedance is way off. Not a good idea.
A pair of low impedance headphones will have a 32ohm input, and a pair of high impedance headphones will have a 600ohm one.

I wouldn't really see the problem with so small of a mismatch considering the power coming out of the amp.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#18
This might be your cheapest solution for the exact fix to what you asked:

Plug the amp speaker out into this:
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SDirect?adpos=1o1&creative=54989263441&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CPXsk8r9ysACFSsV7AodCTsALQ

Be sure to have the speaker input switch on.

And then plug the output into any of the left channels or the mono channel on this:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/502

Then just plug your headphones into the headphone jack on the mixer.

If you use the XLR connectors you can even power the DI Box from the mixer's phantom power so you won't need to buy batteries or a wallwart.

Both have many other uses, too, so they're good to have around anyway.
#19
Can I not just get some really high impedance headphones? Also why would I turn it up too far, I never put my headphones on straight away and then switch on the amp.
#20
Quote by benjaminhonan
Can I not just get some really high impedance headphones? Also why would I turn it up too far, I never put my headphones on straight away and then switch on the amp.
Most phones are fairly high impedance, 600 ohms IIRC.
Quote by benjaminhonan
Thank you! Just one small question what does impedance tell you about a speaker though, I know it has units of resistance but that's about it, thanks :P.
"Impedance", is a combination of resistive an inductive reactance.

In other words, a speaker voice coil doesn't have its full value, say "8 ohms", in pure resistance. Part of the value is inductive (*), and it varies with frequency. So, the speaker's "impedance" is actually an average or representative value.

Headphones have a much higher impedance than do loudspeakers, as a consequence of this, they would limit current flow from the amp's output, and likely, and quite provisionally be used in the speaker output circuit.

However, there are so many low priced headphone amplifiers available, it may not be worth the risk.

BTW, so many small amps have headphone jacks anyway. The smallest Peavey Vypyr springs to mind. All you need do with one of those is plug the phones in, and you're there. All effects, and all amp models are available through the phones. In fact those amps have the tiny 3.5mm phone jack, so you wouldn't even need a 1/4" adapter to plug the average headphone set in.


(*) Any coil in an electrical circuit is an inductor, voice coil or otherwise. Radio frequency inductors, (coils), are usually called, "chokes". In conjunction with a capacitor, they form a tuned circuit, with a specific range of bandpass.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 5, 2014,
#21
Quote by Captaincranky
Most phones are fairly high impedance, 600 ohms IIRC.
As far as my experience go, the vast majority of headphones has an input impedance a bit to a lot lower than that, and the only ones I remember having such a high impedance input are the first AKG K240's.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#22
Quote by Spambot_2
As far as my experience go, the vast majority of headphones has an input impedance a bit to a lot lower than that, and the only ones I remember having such a high impedance input are the first AKG K240's.


Yes, old fashioned headphones used to be typical a few hundred ohms. Modern hi-fi ones tend to be in the range 16 to 60.
#23
Quote by PSimonR
Yes, old fashioned headphones used to be typical a few hundred ohms. Modern hi-fi ones tend to be in the range 16 to 60.
I admit to being quite "old school". In fact, I even had a pair of those AKG-240s.

In any event, assuming a pair of headphones honestly HAD a 60 ohm impedance rating, Ohm's Law tells us that would curtail current flow across the output transistors to 1/15 of what it would be @ 4 ohms, Full current doesn't occur until the amps approaches clipping. Clipping would be very much delayed with a 60 ohm output load.

Note, I'm just interjecting this as an academic observation, not anything I'm advising be acted on.

Obviously, 16 ohm phones would present a problem in an amp's output circuit, and 600 ohms phones much less of one.
#24
Why would 16 ohms present a problem to an amp speced for a 4 ohm or greater load? The only advantage to headphones with a higher impedance is that it would make the amp less likely to blown out the headphones.

If you get your amp into clipping with headphones then my guess is that the headphones will be toast by that time. And I would argue that you have it exactly backwards. This is because higher impedance headphones would result in the amp being turned up more to get the same power output. Clipping would be most likely to result in a higher impedance load. Since power = V squared /R it obvious that higher volts are required to produce the same power when the load resistance is higher.
#25
Quote by fly135
Why would 16 ohms present a problem to an amp speced for a 4 ohm or greater load? The only advantage to headphones with a higher impedance is that it would make the amp less likely to blown out the headphones....[ ]....
I guess that I worded that poorly. Either that, or you don't consider blowing up the headphones a problem.

The rest of the story is, the amp's B+ voltage can't exceed that of the PSU. Therefore, high impedance can only result in current limiting, not a voltage increase to compensate for the drop in current.

In any case, I expect it could be a fine line between the headphone's voice coils fusing from heat, the speaker protection relays kicking in, or the output transistor's junctions burning up. Granted, destroying the transistors would be more likely in the event of a, (much larger), speaker voice coil shorting out.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 10, 2014,
#26
Basically, TC, all of this tech talk about impedance and whatnot aside.... Just don't plug headphones into that jack. That's not what it's made for. Your amp does not have a headphone output. But, it's a small amp, and probably sounds just fine at relatively low volumes. I would hope that even in a cramped apartment building, you'd be able to get away with low volume jamming, as long as it doesn't get too late. If you absolutely have to go headphones, sell/trade for an amp with a headphone output. Or even one of those amp modeling multi-effect units. The Line 6 PODs are pretty much made for your situation.
#27
Quote by Captaincranky
I guess that I worded that poorly. Either that, or you don't consider blowing up the headphones a problem..
I was specifically addressing your claim about 16 ohm phones causing a problem in the amp's output circuit. I think that my mentioning the possibility of toasting the headphones in every post, including what you quoted sufficient to indicate I thought it was a problem.