#1
Hi everyone,
I just started guitar, and I am currently renting a washburn WD11S acoustic guitar for school, since I'm taking lessons.
I love the acoustic, and actually I really want to play electric, but my teacher says we will be only learning acoustic, so I will have to go somewhere else to learn. I can use my brothers les paul standard and he has the amp. So I think after I'm done with acoustic lessons I want to move up to electric, since I want to play that over acoustic.
Back to the question, I still want to have an acoustic on hand, and I could save up to $300 and up in just a couple of months. I want to have a good acoustic guitar that I won't have to buy a new one in a few years.
1. are guitars made in china bad?
2. i've been looking into alvarez and takamine, (I can go to shops too to try out) which ones do you like? Other brands would be great too!
Oh, and I like dreadnought styles, and steel strings is what I like.
I'm so sorry if this is scattered and all over the place, I'm just confused.
Thank you.
#2
1. Some guitars made in China are bad but some guitars made in China are good. Same thing goes for most countries where guitars are made. Actually some guitars made in China are very very good indeed and, for your budget, that is probably where your guitar is going to come from.

2. I've never played an Alvarez so I can't comment. I have played a Takamine and it was very good but it was a long time ago and was probably made in Japan.

Other makes that I've played and been impressed with are: Cort, Crafter, LAG, Recording King, Tanglewood, Vintage, Yamaha.

If I was going to buy a dreadnought today I'd probably go for the Recording King RD-06 which is an excellent quality, great sounding guitar.

And there is no reason why you should need to buy another guitar in a few years time. The notion that you need to buy a more expensive guitar as you become a more proficient player is nonsense.
Last edited by Garthman at Sep 6, 2014,
#3
Quote by Rockwellguitar
Hi everyone,
I just started guitar, and I am currently renting a washburn WD11S acoustic guitar for school, since I'm taking lessons.
I love the acoustic, and actually I really want to play electric, but my teacher says we will be only learning acoustic, so I will have to go somewhere else to learn. I can use my brothers les paul standard and he has the amp. So I think after I'm done with acoustic lessons I want to move up to electric, since I want to play that over acoustic.
When you, "learn acoustic", you are learning a big part of electric, but with a few exceptions of course. The fret boards are the same, and so the fingerings are the same.

There is a very different touch involved, plus all the complexities of playing with high gain and distortion. In bands where the 2 types of guitars are used together, the acoustic, (in general), is used as a rhythm instrument and oftentimes for the singers self accompaniment. The electric would be playing rhythm at times, but at a different position, and of course the solo parts.

Quote by Rockwellguitar
Back to the question, I still want to have an acoustic on hand, and I could save up to $300 and up in just a couple of months. I want to have a good acoustic guitar that I won't have to buy a new one in a few years.


Quote by Rockwellguitar
1. are guitars made in china bad?
No, not in the least, not in this day. The same goes for guitars made in Indonesia and Korea.

A big chunk of the price of guitars made in America, goes toward paying American wages, nothing more.

Besides, $300.00 would likely only buy you the headstock and maybe 1/2 the neck of the lowest priced Martins, Taylors, or Gibsons. My point being, they're going to have to be good enough.

But the truth is, a great portion of guitars coming out of Asia in general, are excellent!

Quote by Rockwellguitar
2. i've been looking into alvarez and takamine, (I can go to shops too to try out) which ones do you like? Other brands would be great too!
Oh, and I like dreadnought styles, and steel strings is what I like..


Probably 80+% of all acoustic sold are steel string flat top designs, and a huge chunk of those are dreadnoughts. So, it would be harder to avoid getting a steel string dread, than any other type.

The two most often recommended guitars here at UG, are the Yamaha FG-700 @ $200.00, and the Seagull, "Original S-6", coming in at just short of $500.00, in acoustic only form. The Yamaha can be had in electric form, with cutaway, @ about $300.00. That would be my recommendation for you. That model number is FGX-700. It would last a few years, and, (of course you're not going to but), in case you quit, acoustic-electrics are easier to sell.

Once you get past a certain point in skill, it's plenty of fun to plug in an acoustic. Then you get to play with certain effects like chorus, reverb, delay, and even phasing. You just can't go big on the gain and distortion, that's what the electric is for.

The biggest favor you could possibly do yourself going forward, is working on your vocal skills simultaneously with the guitar. Many songs have to be re-keyed for different singers, so it also helps to learn some theory in the way of reading top line melodies off sheet music.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 6, 2014,
#4
Hi,
Thank you very much. I started looking into the yamaha you recommended, and the seagull S-6.
I can afford both, but they both look so tempting. If you could, maybe you could recommended me a review or what your personal preference is? I can't buy this for about 2 months, so I have the time to decided and save up my money. I just don't want to pay my rental bill for my current guitar, so that's why I want to buy a better guitar.
I guess the quote here comes in handy. "The tools did not make the carpenter" or however that goes.
Thank you again for taking the time to help me out. I will continue to look for reviews.
#6
Just watched the video on how yamaha makes their guitars in china.
They look really nice. I think I probably will go with them.
#7
1) IMO, most MIC guitars are very good these days, but you need to budget for a good set up on any guitar.

2) Alvarez and Tak are OK, but there are a lot of others. In your price range I would be looking particularly at Recording King and Tanglewood. RK have resettable necks, which shows attention to detail, and many of the Tanglewoods I've played have sounded outstanding.
#8
Hi,
I have another question.
If I want to play some.... How do I say this? like sorta rock/pop music like kurt cobain or pearl jam, what wood would be best for this?I know I have a les paul for this kind of job, but I'm talking not country, like deep music. I do like the feel of sitka spruce and mahogany, but would this be bad for that genre? (I would be getting an acoustic-electric)
Thank you
#9
Quote by Rockwellguitar
Hi,
I have another question.
If I want to play some.... How do I say this? like sorta rock/pop music like kurt cobain or pearl jam, what wood would be best for this?I know I have a les paul for this kind of job, but I'm talking not country, like deep music. I do like the feel of sitka spruce and mahogany, but would this be bad for that genre? (I would be getting an acoustic-electric)
Thank you


Don't worry about wood - it's how you play that counts.