#1
Im looking for songs that give good context for chords with weird extentions.
Any help is appreciated. I want expand my chord vocabulary, but need some examples of those chords actually in use.

Anything from 9th to m9 to diminished to add9 chords.
#3
All jazz? lol.

Listening is good, but experimenting is another way to learn. Come up with a chord progression and see how it sounds with different extensions or chord substitutions. For example you can substitute ii for IV in major or ii dim for iv in minor or a neapolitan chord, etc.

Got Cm - Fm, Gm?

Well try Cm9 - Dm7b5/F - G7#5b9 or something

As long as two chords have the same function, you can substitute them with one another, but that's a whole topic in itself. In my example I substituted the second chord, iv, with ii dim 6/5. It works, because they both are in this case dominant preparations for the incoming G chord.

But yeah, bottom line. Just f*ck around with the extensions. I went maybe a little offtopic with that substitution thing
Last edited by Elintasokas at Sep 6, 2014,
#4
Jazz and fusion are the two styles i would say use extensions the most, you are not likely to find many tunes that don´t use "wierd extensions" in those styles.

Check out jazz musicians like: Joe Pass, George Van Eps, Jody Fisher, Royce Campbell, Dave Stryker and Erik Söderlind. That is a few of many i can recommend for good use of extensions, and where you will hear it properly.

Check out fusion musicians like: Allan Holdsworth, Steve Khan, John Scofield, Mike Stern. Also great work with extensions.

The examples i have provided will allow you to hear these extensions in a good context. Also listen to a player by the name of Eric Johnson, he is (like Holdsworth and Pass) a master of chords.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Sep 6, 2014,
#7
If You Want Me to Stay
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


Quote by metal4eva_22
What's this about ****ing corpses? My UG senses were tingling.
#8
Wow, thanks Elintasokas, Sickz and Nero Galon
Last edited by Rensa at Sep 6, 2014,
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Jazz, jazz, and more jazz.


This hasn't been covered extensively but perhaps you should check out some jazz? Police if you want reggae-ponk fusion with some eXtended Kords?
#10
check ted greene out..he is a chord master...he has some books "Modern Chord Progressions"...with many examples of what your looking for
#11
Quote by wolflen
check ted greene out..he is a chord master...he has some books "Modern Chord Progressions"...with many examples of what your looking for


He also has a great book called "Chord Chemistry". Chord Chemistry together with Modern Chord Progressions are a great basis to work from when it comes to chords, voicings, inversions, progressions, substitutions and chord melody.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#12
Quote by Charlie4
This hasn't been covered extensively but perhaps you should check out some jazz?



Police if you want reggae-ponk fusion with some eXtended Kords?

Wtf is a KORD? It's spelled c-h-o-r-d, dude.