#2
Because you tuned it that way, that is the only reason.
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#3
It's something people decided a long time ago and everyone just got used to it and accepted it as the norm, but you can be a revolutionary free thinker, and escape from the shackles of tradition and convention by tuning your guitar however you want.
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#4
It's 2 octaves higher. Just because it is!
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#5
Quote by Blompcube
It's something people decided a long time ago and everyone just got used to it and accepted it as the norm, but you can be a revolutionary free thinker, and escape from the shackles of tradition and convention by tuning your guitar however you want.


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#6
I'm not too sure on the origins of the guitar but I do know a few things. The first 4 strings are tuned the same way an upright bass would be, all 4ths. I'm going to assume having the top string be another E was because this way open chords would work, having the root be on both the top and bottom creates a nice resolve within the chord, and allows all chords to be fingered appropriately. From there we kind of fudged it a little with the b string by making it a 3rd interval in order for the top string to be an E. The guitar kind of borrows it's tuning from previous incarnations of the instrument, such as the 5 string guitarra battente (16th century) tuned ADGBE, and the Lute, which would often be tuned to EADF#Be.
#7
People have figured out it's a good way of tuning the guitar. It works for chords pretty well. If all strings were for example tuned in fourths, it could make playing basic chords hard. Now playing basic and barre chords is relatively easy. It just works.

The difference between the low and high E is two octaves.

But you can try different tunings. Most guitarists play in standard tuning so it will be the easiest tuning to learn songs in. I would suggest learning to play in standard tuning first and once you are good at it, start experimenting with different tunings if you want.
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#8
Yes definitely do explore open/alt tunings. You can really find a new inspired sound from exploring tunings. And most of the time the scales and chords are really easy.
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#9
Quote by matiss.gutans
Why? And what octave is high e? Don't understand this.


Guitar starts at E2 (around 82Hz). The high E string is tuned to E4 (around 330Hz) and if you have a 24-fret guitar, the top note is E6 (around 1318Hz). That gives you four octaves to work with.

FWIW, a piano usually runs from C1 (32.7 Hz) to C8 (4186 Hz). Middle C is 261.6Hz

A=440, to which most of us tune orchestras, is actually the fifth fret of the high E string (A4). Guitar is ordinarily tuned to 110Hz (the A2 open string), two octaves down.

As to "why," the answer is simply "convention." Same reason that violins are tuned in fifths, etc. Probably had to do with fingerings, chording, ability to produce scales in all major and minor versions. Same reason that guitars ordinarily have six strings (except for Russian guitars, which had 7 strings back in the 1700's).
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
People have figured out it's a good way of tuning the guitar. It works for chords pretty well. If all strings were for example tuned in fourths, it could make playing basic chords hard. Now playing basic and barre chords is relatively easy. It just works.

The difference between the low and high E is two octaves.

But you can try different tunings. Most guitarists play in standard tuning so it will be the easiest tuning to learn songs in. I would suggest learning to play in standard tuning first and once you are good at it, start experimenting with different tunings if you want.


+1
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#12
High e is 2 octaves higher. There is a high E because of the low e. If the guitar was tuned to 4ths on all strings, B would be C, and high e would be E#. This would make a bar major (or minor) chord be suspended twice, including the one of the octave notes it's based on, which I can't imagine would sound pretty. You would have to bar a note lower, with your middle, ring, and pinky forward a fret more than before, and you'd have to use your thumb to hold the bass note. That's too difficult for a simple chord like a major chord. Also, both major and minor pentatonic scales, which are heavily used on guitar, all have a fret that all strings include going up or down the scale. That would unbalance it. With chords, you would need to use all your fingers, plus one for some chords. 6 strings are way too many to have chords like that. Hope that answers your question.
Last edited by VanhalenVai at Sep 7, 2014,