#1
Hi all, was messing around earlier, and got something I quite liked. Problem is, I want to add to it, but don't know what I can add.

What scale is this built around? this is the link https://soundcloud.com/conan-jonathon-pierre-middleton/tracks .

I want to add more to this, and create my first song, but the first thing is discovering which scale its built on, and the bloody key! I guess its in E as thats the bass note, and the first note played next,, I hope Ive got that right, But if you could offer me some help what I can play over it it would be great. The closest I can find is E natural minor, but there is a note in there thats not in the scale.

Sorry if its a newbie question, but I'm really enjoying guitar and want to progress.
Last edited by conanwarrior at Sep 7, 2014,
#2
I've worked out its E natural minor, just with a A sharp thrown in at one point to create the sound I like. What is this called when you use notes not in a scale to musical effect? And is it the norm so to speak?
#4
Quote by conanwarrior
I've worked out its E natural minor, just with a A sharp thrown in at one point to create the sound I like. What is this called when you use notes not in a scale to musical effect? And is it the norm so to speak?

You are just playing an accidental - a note that doesn't belong to the scale. It's really common in all music. You aren't limited to 7 notes of a scale. You can use all 12 notes all the time.

Also, the note you are playing is not A sharp, it is D sharp. D sharp is the leading tone of E minor and can also be found in the E harmonic minor scale. But I wouldn't think that much about scales - they don't tell a lot about what's happening in music. You need to take the context into account. It is hard to explain if you don't understand music theory that much. But the point is to see the big picture. What is the function of that note? What happened before the note and what happens after the note?

But yeah, to answer your question, you could say you are mixing E natural and harmonic minor. Or you could just say you are using accidentals.

^ And don't learn about modes yet, they will just confuse you. First learn about keys so that you understand them well.

Oh, and here's a link that should work: https://soundcloud.com/conan-jonathon-pierre-middleton/which-scale-is-this-built-upon
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 7, 2014,
#5
I think it's easier to think about as chords.

The ending of your riff is going D D B B e (in terms of the chords).

The D# you're playing is the 3rd on the B.
#6
Quote by Nitnatsnok
I think it's easier to think about as chords.

The ending of your riff is going D D B B e (in terms of the chords).

The D# you're playing is the 3rd on the B.

Yeah, I agree. But it requires some theory knowledge and a good ear to be able to figure out the chords from single notes. But this is also the way I thought when I heard the riff.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
that scale is actually illegal in many countries in europe and certain US states and provinces. even typing its name would get me thrown in guantanamo and tortured for the rest of my life. i recommend taking down that soundcloud link because untold consequences will rain upon your home

get out while you can, kid, and forget that riff ever existed. you're in over your head
#8
Thanks for all the replies, although some I do not understand. I will get there though . Also, your correct, it was a D sharp, got myself confused, sorry about that. The function of that note was to change the feel of the song, I noticed when I added that it kind of made it a bit more sombre so to speak, but I have no idea why it does this. This is what I want to learn.


Is there a good place I can learn about Keys, as I have trouble understanding these. I'm learning scales and so forth, but ask me what key a song is in, I won't know.
Last edited by conanwarrior at Sep 8, 2014,
#9
Why does the scale matter? What's more important is the key the riff is in!

Quote by conanwarrior
Is there a good place I can learn about Keys, as I have trouble understanding these. I'm learning scales and so forth, but ask me what key a song is in, I won't know.

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/24

There you go! Good starting place for ya.
#10
Thank you crazysam, I shall have a look at that now .
EDIT: I've read that, am still pretty much none the wiser. I'm finding it quite confusing knowing what key I am actually in.
Last edited by conanwarrior at Sep 9, 2014,
#11
Quote by conanwarrior
Thank you crazysam, I shall have a look at that now .
EDIT: I've read that, am still pretty much none the wiser. I'm finding it quite confusing knowing what key I am actually in.

Ok, allow me to simplify. The single thing that determines what key you are in is what notes sounds like "home". We call this home note "the tonic". The tonic should always sound resolved, as if it doesn't need to go anywhere. Going from the tonic to another note should create tension.

The link I gave you talks about key signatures.
#12
Start listening to simple chord progressions and try finding the tonic. Play C, F and G major chords. It should feel a bit "incomplete". Now if you end the progression with a C major chord, it should sound complete. So that's your tonic. You always feel some pull towards the tonic.

In your riff the tonic is E. Especially in the end you should feel a strong pull towards E (the D# note wants to go up to the E note). Also why the E feels like the tonic is because there is always two E notes between every note.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115