#1
My neighbor had a Peavey 410 tower sitting at the end of his driveway for free yesterday, so I grabbed it because worst case scenario, I can just put it at the end of MY driveway if it doesn't work. I took it apart, discovered that there were only two speakers left, and rewired it. One was completely dead and the other fractured as soon as I put a signal through it.

However, rather than put it at the end of my driveway, I'm gonna rebuild it. The enclosure is free of cracks, the grill and tolex is intact, and I've never built a cabinet so it'll be a fun little experiment.

I plan on using it as a second cab both for myself playing guitar through a 412 for one band as well as my bass player in another band in conjunction with his 115. The only issue is that I know next to dick about speakers. I don't need anything high quality and would like to keep my budget under $150 if possible.

My main concern (confusion?) is that a lot of 10" speakers I've seen are 70w or 20w. Quick math, that's 280w or 80w total going into the cab? So will I have any issues using a 100w head?
#2
You should take a look at your amp head specs. Power always depends on impedance, a 100W amp usually provides less than 100W when you connect it to a 4ohm impedance, less than 50W for 8ohm and less than 25W for 16 ohm.

When you know your amp and speakers specs you can decide how to connect the speakers to obtain your desired impedance and avoid problems. If you post links to your head and speakers spec sheets I can help you choose your wiring.
#4
According to the vk100 manual, its RMS power is 100W for all 4, 8 and 16 ohm.

Jensen provides the mod 10 35 in two different versions: 8 and 16 ohm nominal impedance. Both versions can handle up to 35W RMS, so the cabinet max RMS power will be 140W. 40% is enough room to connect your Peavey head without problems.

If you buy four units, 16 ohm each, connect them all together in parallel and you will have a 4 ohm cabinet. Diagram: http://mojoshout.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/parallel-output-4.png

If you buy four units, 8 ohm each, connect them in series by pairs and then connect the two pairs in parallel and you will get an 8 ohm cabinet. Diagram: http://mojoshout.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/parallel-series.png

Remember to set up the right impedance in your amp.

I hope this helps.
#5
I forgot two things:

There is another option, you can buy four 16 ohm speakers, connect them parallel-series and have a 16ohm cabinet.

The option I would choose is an 8ohm cabinet, because every amp will be able to handle this impedance. Maybe one day you want to change your amp head, or sell your cabinet.
#6
Quote by jipijopo

If you buy four units, 8 ohm each, connect them in series by pairs and then connect the two pairs in parallel and you will get an 8 ohm cabinet. Diagram: http://mojoshout.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/parallel-series.png[/url


I was planning on doing something along these lines, but wasn't quite sure how. Thanks for the help.
#7
Quote by hardcore81

I plan on using it as a second cab both for myself playing guitar through a 412 for one band as well as my bass player in another band in conjunction with his 115.


Whoa there. Unless you have a crossover or high pass filter that keeps the low end OUT of those speakers, you will NOT want to use ordinary guitar speakers in that cabinet and bolt it to your bass player's system. Yes, you've seen 4x10 boxes used by bass players, but those are bass speakers and a properly (hopefully) designed and sized cabinet for bass. Especially true if you think you're going to use cheap speakers.
#8
Quote by dspellman
Whoa there. Unless you have a crossover or high pass filter that keeps the low end OUT of those speakers, you will NOT want to use ordinary guitar speakers in that cabinet and bolt it to your bass player's system. Yes, you've seen 4x10 boxes used by bass players, but those are bass speakers and a properly (hopefully) designed and sized cabinet for bass. Especially true if you think you're going to use cheap speakers.


The amp does have a crossover