#1
Hi all. Just signed up to the site.

I'm a keyboardist who can't play guitar. I've been told recently that you can tell what chord a guitarist is playing by looking at his chording hand. I had no idea this was a thing and have always relied on verbal info..."E, A, D" etc.

I'm sure it's just that my search terms were wrong, but I couldn't find any info on this from the Google. Any input from you guys who actually play?

Thanks in advance!
#2
If you have knowledge about the fretboard and basic chords shapes, it can help you. Otherwise it's as pointless as telling someone who's never played wood winds that you can see what note a flute player is playing by the hand movements.

Your ear is a much better asset to invest in.
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#3
If you don't know any chords on a guitar then you won't be able to tell what chord someone's playing just by looking at their hand. You could very easily just learn to play the "open chords" like E, Em, A, Am, D, Dm, F, Fm, C, G, and maybe some of the 7th chord variations, and once you know how to play them you can recognize them. I don't think this needs further explanation. To recognize barre chords you would need to learn where the notes are on the guitar and a few of hand shapes.


Edit: Yea, and as megano said - if you have no interest in learning the guitar (or whatever the instrument in question is) then it's best to just work on recognizing chords by ear.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Sep 9, 2014,
#4
Thanks y'alls.

I can play a chord after I've heard it, but I do a fair amount of jamming and I don't want to be always a half-second behind, so just listening is out.

I guess I need to learn how to play basic guitar chords.

Cheers.
#5
If you're interested in chord shapes try searching for "chord chart" or "chord diagrams". You could start memorizing and strumming the basic open position major and minor chords by rote and then try strumming songs with easy chords from song books for some time until shifting from chord to chord becomes second nature.
Once your fret hand gets stronger, try moveable shapes and barre chords...

This might not take overnight, but if ever you get serious about guitar playing then try memorizing the arrangement of notes on the fretboard and translate your keyboard vocabulary of chords onto the guitar because the principle of chord construction is similar to some extent on both instruments.
Last edited by ha_asgag at Sep 10, 2014,
#6
Quote by djfldjfl
Thanks y'alls.

I can play a chord after I've heard it, but I do a fair amount of jamming and I don't want to be always a half-second behind, so just listening is out.

I guess I need to learn how to play basic guitar chords.

Cheers.


You're still going to be a half second behind, if you have to read the potential chords before processing and deciding how you'll react.

It sounds like your method of improvisation is strange. Or it could just be that harmonic improvisation is much more difficult than melodic improvisation.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#7
Quote by megano28
You're still going to be a half second behind, if you have to read the potential chords before processing and deciding how you'll react.

It sounds like your method of improvisation is strange. Or it could just be that harmonic improvisation is much more difficult than melodic improvisation.



I don't think I mentioned anything about improvisation...I was responding to somebody who said to use my ears. When in doubt, octaving/power chording the tonic note is my general default when I have no idea what I'm doing. And that happens a lot at jam nights...I'm stuck on stage playing songs I not only don't know how to play, but don't even know how they go. It's definitely not as fun or cool as it may sound. Cheers.