#1
Hi all,
I'm a beginner player looking to buy my first guitar to sing with. I sing in the mid-high tones, similar to Jayesslee(tone, not skill lol).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zg5EXh6xQqk
I notice female singers like them usually use smaller bodied guitars. I'm 165cm tall and of a very similar build to them if that helps.

I hope to learn guitar to accompany my singing so I can perform casually in the future eg. busking, cafes etc.

-Should I buy an OM/000/auditorium guitar for what I am trying to achieve here?

I read online that Jayesslee use a Breedlove OM/ER but I know too little about guitars to spend that money on my first guitar. The only guitars that look anything like an OM/000/auditorium style available to me for purchase(very limited guitar choices available where I live and I need it quickly so no online shopping) and in my budget are:

-Recording King Ro 06
http://www.recordingking.com/product...l-models/ro-06

-Yamaha APX 500 III
http://usa.yamaha.com/products/music...apx/apx500iii/
;Is this an OM/000/A, I cannot find the measurement online?
;This has a cutaway, is an electronic acoustic and supposedly thin. Will this least like the Breedlove out of all 3 guitars?


-Fender Folk CF140S
;I noticed that its lower bout width is 14.5", which is a smaller than a 000/0M/A.
;Will this sound 'less' than a 000/OM/A somehow?

-Which of the 3 guitars would you recommend?

I went to the music store to try them out and I cannot really tell the difference, and I don't know anyone who does. Hope you guys can help me. Thanks
Last edited by hkgm at Sep 10, 2014,
#2
To what extent do you call yourself a beginner? It'll help us help you. It seems to me that you have little to no experience playing guitar. What do you hope to achieve with this guitar? What will you be playing (specific answers help)?

Quote by hkgm

I notice female singers like them usually use smaller bodied guitars. I'm 165cm tall and of a very similar build to them if that helps.

Go and try different shapes and sizes, not just guitars that are similar to one another in shape and size. Even if you're a beginner, you should get a general idea. Somewhat accurately, your ears will tell you what sound you like most and your body will tell you which one feels comfortable. Of course, there's more of a gamble relying on your own instinct as a beginner compared to an experienced guitarist. There's really no way around it, at least one that I know. Even people who play guitar for decades might experience buyer's remorse.

Quote by hkgm
I hope to learn guitar to accompany my singing so I can perform casually in the future eg. busking, cafes etc.

Get something that complements your singing and your comfort preferences. For what it's worth, I'm a bit taller than you are and take to a dreadnought shape just fine, even whilst singing.

Quote by hkgm
-Should I buy an OM/000/auditorium guitar for what I am trying to achieve here?

You should buy a OM/000/Auditorium if that's what suits you, not because that's what other people do.

The general consensus is that dreadnought guitars sound more resonant, full, and louder than OM/000/Auditorium shapes. You might prefer the look of those guitars, I know I do too, but I have a dreadnought because that's what sounded best to me and it was comfortable. If you prefer the sound of OM/000/Auditorium shapes, then that works, but don't simply disqualify guitars because you like the look of particular shapes a great deal.

Quote by hkgm
-Yamaha APX 500 III
http://usa.yamaha.com/products/music...apx/apx500iii/
;Is this an OM/000/A, I cannot find the measurement online?
;This has a cutaway, is an electronic acoustic and supposedly thin. Will this least like the Breedlove out of all 3 guitars?

No, it is not.

I neglected to mention that the names of the shapes typically refer to brands, because that's what brands name those shapes. There's definitely some overlap, but OM/000 usually refers to Martin guitars of those shapes (e.g. Martin 000-18, Martin OMJM). Auditorium might be a more general term, I think some Martin guitars have "Auditorium" guitars but I've only seen/heard this term when referring to a Taylor Grand Auditorium.

It's not really possible for us to tell how one guitar will sound compared to another if we haven't tried them, which is unlikely when comparing these two specific ones (Breedlove model and Yamaha model).
Quote by hkgm
-Fender Folk CF140S
;I noticed that its lower bout width is 14.5", which is a smaller than a 000/0M/A.
;Will this sound 'less' than a 000/OM/A somehow?

The mantra is that the bigger the acoustic guitar, the more resonant and full it sounds. In short, probably.

Quote by hkgm
-Which of the 3 guitars would you recommend?

I went to the music store to try them out and I cannot really tell the difference, and I don't know anyone who does. Hope you guys can help me. Thanks

Are you sure you don't know anyone? Try again, and take an experienced guitarist with you to the store, as the sales staff has an agenda and might not give you the most honest answer. Of course, only you can tell if the guitar is most suited to you.

If you really don't have anyone, like I said, try it for yourself and gamble.

If you learn nothing else from what I've said today/you think everything I'm saying is complete rubbish/etc., remember this: Try as many as you can, and look for the one that really stands out among the rest. You may find multiple guitars that speak to you, and that's all right, but at the very least, get an idea, not a notion that the guitar you're going to buy looks like the ones your idols play.
Last edited by chrismendiola at Sep 10, 2014,
#3
Chris gives some great advice, and all I can add to it is to say that you shouldn't worry so much about the guitar "missing" any sound as you put it. All guitars sound slightly different but those differences aren't very obvious at the very beginning so I wouldn't worry about it. As far as the size I would go for a concert size guitar like a Yamaha FS700s or an Ibanez Ac300, those are under $200 and are really comfortable to play and they do have a full sound. And a concert size guitar is basically a OM size guitar. The Yamaha Apx models are designed to be plugged in, so if your playing mainly acoustic I would stay away from those.
#4
I mostly came up with the idea that curved/smaller-bodied guitars are more suitable by listening to people who have a similar singing style on youtube. I noticed that soft-sounding singers mostly use the curved guitars, and louder singers mostly use dreadnoughts.

Your tip about asking a sales person to play is very useful. Each guitar is sold in a different store so hopefully I can compare from my memory.

Thanks for the Ibanez recommendation as well, I am going to check if the stores sell it.
#5
Quote by hkgm
I mostly came up with the idea that curved/smaller-bodied guitars are more suitable by listening to people who have a similar singing style on youtube. I noticed that soft-sounding singers mostly use the curved guitars, and louder singers mostly use dreadnoughts.

I've never noticed this, but you could be right. It certainly makes sense, though I don't know how many people do this, at least consciously. That's interesting.

Quote by hkgm
Your tip about asking a sales person to play is very useful. Each guitar is sold in a different store so hopefully I can compare from my memory.

I didn't say this, but I guess that might work. Just remember that how the guitar feels when you play it and exactly how you play it is just as important as how it sounds. For example, I play with my fingers for the most part and I use my thumb on my fretting hand, which is not as common as those who don't. My hands are quite big, but I still take to thin/regular necks and not to bulky guitars. It's also no use if the other guitarist playing style is different (e.g. he/she is playing folk and I tend to play pop).

Also take note not to mention other guitars at other stores. Or do, but ignore it when he/she tells you that the guitar in his/her store is more for you.
#7
The exception to the, "you should buy a Yamaha, first and foremost", is the model you're looking at.

Yamaha's "APX" series is all laminate, and that particular guitar is thin body as well. If it's not plugged in, it most likely has little to recommend it. Pick another Yamaha.

For all intents and purposes, you should buy a guitar because of its sound, not its shape. The shape does form the sound, and for most practical purposes, bigger guitars make better sound.

I can' comment on any physical limitations you might have with respect to the size of the instrument. But if you want a big guitar to sound like a smaller body, just plug in in, get rid of some of the bass, and boost the treble up a bit. It won't work as well the other way around. Because, too much bass boost is readily apparent, and it sounds "flabby and loose".

Most people of normal stature can handle a dread or jumbo when seated playing. The only reason I can see for a thin, small body, is if you're going to, "stand and deliver", so to speak. In which case you might be better off with a, (perish the thought), Les Paul.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 10, 2014,
#8
Ok you say you're beginner but it sounds like you're in a hurry to buy your first guitar. Do you know how to play at all? If you plan on this being your only guitar, you should try out as many as possible and make sure you get the one that suits you best. You don't learn guitar overnight. For most people it takes months upon months of daily practice to play just the easiest songs. It takes years to get good, provided you have the natural talent to even get good. To play and sing simultaneously, the guitar has to be second nature; ie you have to very good. Best of luck to you. People who want to play an instrument and sing (real musicians) are few these days and it's a breath of fresh air.
#10
i'd go with the recording king - i particularly like their 000 guitars, and their solid tops are pretty good. this recording king has a slightly shorter scale and slightly wider nut, both of which to me are a huge plus, as well as being good for beginners, and i like the englemann top. while 000s aren't small guitars, their slightly smaller size makes them a little more comfortable to play and less boomy, which can be a plus for recording.

while i like a lot of yamahas, the thinner bodied APX series sounds flat and cardboardy to me, and i haven't been happy overall with folk sized guitars in general.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!