Poll: Does it mean?
Poll Options
View poll results: Does it mean?
almost
4 9%
everything except for
36 78%
I don't care
6 13%
Voters: 46.
Page 1 of 2
#1
"All but" does it mean "almost" or "everything except for". People say it's both, but that is all but possible.

It annoys me as much as people that say "I could care less".
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
Last edited by Neo Evil11 at Sep 10, 2014,
#3
Surely it means 'All except..."?

Could you give an example of each usage so I know what I'm familiar with?
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#5
All = Everything
But = Exception

I never hear anyone use that phrase to begin with, though.
There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#6
Quote by Baby Joel
Surely it means 'All except..."?

Could you give an example of each usage so I know what I'm familiar with?

Just read somewhere "it's all but impossible" where the author tried to convey the message that it is almost impossible to predict. It's used a lot in what is my opinion the wrong usage.

Merriam-webster:
all but adverb : very nearly
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
Last edited by Neo Evil11 at Sep 10, 2014,
#8
Quote by Neo Evil11
Just read somewhere "it's all but impossible" where the author tried to convey the message that it is almost impossible to predict. It's used a lot in what is my opinion the wrong usage.

oh yeah well that's fine as well. It's essentially saying "it's everything except impossible" meaning it's as close to impossible as it could be, without actually being impossible.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#9
Quote by Baby Joel
oh yeah well that's fine as well. It's essentially saying "it's everything except impossible" meaning it's as close to impossible as it could be, without actually being impossible.

To me that sounds more like: it's everything except for impossible. As in: it's definitely not impossible.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#10
saying "I could care less" drives me up the wall

but yeah, "All but" means everything except that one thing you said. If there were 4 cakes on the table, and I've had a slice of 3 of them, but not the 4th, I would say "I've had a slice of all but that one"


why is this even a question? this is basic english

wait no, it means very close to if used descriptively or some shit. Like almost, but fancier
Eat your pheasant
Drink your wine
Your days are numbered, bourgeois swine!
Last edited by Bladez22 at Sep 10, 2014,
#11
Yes, I ****ing hate this phrase. P sure it means 'almost' tho, but the latter feels more right
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#12
OED (for limey fucks)
a. As an adverbial phrase: almost, very nearly, well-nigh.
b. As an adjectival phrase: almost complete or entire.
#15
knew it
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#16
Quote by Neo Evil11
To me that sounds more like: it's everything except for impossible. As in: it's definitely not impossible.

yeah well English isn't even your first language so
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#17
Quote by Neo Evil11
Just read somewhere "it's all but impossible" where the author tried to convey the message that it is almost impossible to predict. It's used a lot in what is my opinion the wrong usage.

Merriam-webster:

Pretend you have a number line from possible to impossible. It's implying you've hit every stop on that number line except for impossible.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#18
Quote by Baby Joel
yeah well English isn't even your first language so

That's why I have to interpret everything literally and get confused when people mean the reverse of the thing they actually say. Like if they say I could care less. To me that sounds as if they do care at least a little, but they actually mean they don't care. Or if they use literally when they mean figuratively.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#19
Quote by caeser1156
Pretend you have a number line from possible to impossible. It's implying you've hit every stop on that number line except for impossible.

Which is what I mean. It does not mean that it's practically impossible. It's excluding impossible from the set of things that are relevant.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#21
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I could care less that it bothers you!

I'm glad you care a little bit, though.
#22
Quote by Dimarzio45
I'm glad you care a little bit, though.

Indeed.

Quote by Neo Evil11
That's why I have to interpret everything literally and get confused when people mean the reverse of the thing they actually say.

You should fucking know better. Would you interpret French literally?!
#23
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
You should fucking know better. Would you interpret French literally?!

Oui.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#25
Quote by Baby Joel
yeah well English isn't even your first language so
While english isn't my first language too, I'm gonna go with Neo's opinion - that does sound like "it's everything but not impossible", meaning that while it may or may not seem otherwise, it is not impossible.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#26
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Ensuite, vous êtes muet.

Non.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#27
Quote by Neo Evil11
Which is what I mean. It does not mean that it's practically impossible. It's excluding impossible from the set of things that are relevant.

But it would mean its practically impossible through implications.

Here's what I mean:

  • Very Possible
  • Possible
  • Practical
  • Difficult
  • Impractical
  • Very Difficult
  • Near Impossible
  • Impossible


So all the bolded ones represent the All. So it is all but impossible. Everything except for impossible. Which implies that it's near impossible because near impossible is as far down the line as you can get without it being actually impossible.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#28
Quote by Spambot_2
While english isn't my first language too, I'm gonna go with Neo's opinion - that does sound like "it's everything but not impossible", meaning that while it may or may not seem otherwise, it is not impossible.

Why is it that you non-native English speakers can't not not deal with them double negatives?
#29
Quote by neidnarb11890
OED (for limey fucks)
a. As an adverbial phrase: almost, very nearly, well-nigh.
b. As an adjectival phrase: almost complete or entire.

Meh, as murrcan, I agree.

Neo is just being a dumbledore and bitching about idioms.

"I could care less" is a cardinal sin in my book though.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#30
Quote by caeser1156
But it would mean its practically impossible through implications.

Here's what I mean:

  • Very Possible
  • Possible
  • Practical
  • Difficult
  • Impractical
  • Very Difficult
  • Near Impossible
  • Impossible


So all the bolded ones represent the All. So it is all but impossible. Everything except for impossible. Which implies that it's near impossible because near impossible is as far down the line as you can get without it being actually impossible.

Here is what I mean: if you say the solution is all but Pi. Then the solution space is the real line R exluding pi. R\pi. It does not mean the solution is necessarily close to pi.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#31
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here is what I mean: if you say the solution is all but Pi. Then the solution space is the real line R exluding pi. R\pi. It does not mean the solution is close to pi.

But, technically, if the solution is R excluding pi, it also includes the section close to pi.
#32
Quote by Neo Evil11
That's why I have to interpret everything literally and get confused when people mean the reverse of the thing they actually say. Like if they say I could care less. To me that sounds as if they do care at least a little, but they actually mean they don't care. Or if they use literally when they mean figuratively.


People use 'literally' to replace 'really' or 'very' and it suks
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#33
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
But, technically, if the solution is R excluding pi, it also includes the section close to pi.

In this case yeah, but if we had a set {-infinity,pi,infinite} Saying the solution is all but pi. Means the solution is -infinity and infinity. They are not close to pi.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#34
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here is what I mean: if you say the solution is all but Pi. Then the solution space is the real line R exluding pi. R\pi. It does not mean the solution is necessarily close to pi.

Yeah I know, but I'm just telling you how the idiom came to be. It's just an exaggeration of an expression. So the two different definitions you gave in the poll aren't contradictory, one is just a hyperbole.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#35
Quote by Neo Evil11
In this case yeah, but if we had a set {-infinity,pi,infinite} Saying the solution is all but pi. Means the solution is -infinity and infinity. They are not close to pi.

That kind of notation means (going left to right): "The numbers from negative infinity to (but not including) pi, and the numbers from (but not including) pi to infinity". So, the solution does include numbers close to pi.
#36
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
That kind of notation means (going left to right): "The numbers from negative infinity to (but not including) pi, and the numbers from (but not including) pi to infinity". So, the solution does include numbers close to pi.

No, it's a discrete set m8, not an interval.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#37
Quote by Neo Evil11
No, it's a discrete set m8, not an interval.

Then you should have stated that.

Interval notation and discrete set notation is too similar to not state that.

inb4 Ean tells me I'm wrong.
#38
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Then you should have stated that.

The curly brackets state that. An interval is [] if it's closed or () if it's open.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#39
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here is what I mean: if you say the solution is all but Pi. Then the solution space is the real line R exluding pi. R\pi. It does not mean the solution is necessarily close to pi.


you would never use All but in a mathematical sense because its open for interpretation, like you're doing. Its a figure of speech
Eat your pheasant
Drink your wine
Your days are numbered, bourgeois swine!
#40
Quote by Neo Evil11
The curly brackets state that. An interval is [] if it's closed or () if it's open.

Nah, I had a math book that used { for open.
Page 1 of 2