#1
One of my profs had this pinned on his door. In case you were wondering how the primitive mosh antics of extreme music concerts resembles the kinetics of gaseous particles and ties in with dynamical systems, the boys at Cornell got you covered. I know we have some math and engineering majors. Pretty interesting paper.

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1302.1886v1

Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: adisordered gas-like state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortex-like state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models

...

Videos filmed by attendees at heavy metal concerts highlight a collective phenomenon consisting of 10^1−10^2 participants commonly referred to as a mosh pit. In mosh pits, the participants (moshers) move randomly, colliding with one another in an undirected fashion. Qualitatively, this phenomenon resembles the kinetics of gaseous particles, even though moshers are self-propelled agents that experience dissipative collisions

...

The collective behavior described here has not been predicted on the basis of staged experiments with humans, making heavy metal concerts a unique model system for reliably, consistently, and ethically studying human collective motion. Further studies in this uniquee nvironment may enhance our understanding of collective motion in riots, protests, and panicked crowds, leading to new architectural safety design principles that limit the risk of injury at extreme social gatherings. Moreover,these concerts have the further advantage of exhibiting a rich variety of states such as the wall of death (mosh-ers split into two groups separated by an open space and, when signaled, simultaneously run at the opposing group), collective jumping (locally correlated, globally decorrelated), and soft modes in jammed attendees.Thus, the extreme conditions at heavy metal concerts offer new opportunities for studying a wide range of col-lective behaviors that arise in extreme social gatherings of large human groups
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#2
Mumbo jumbo voodoo psyence. It's a bunch of sweaty dudes running around and smashing into each other. **** these university dildoes and their psyence experiments. We don't need their false 'expertise'.

American Football linebackers smashing into each other = Violent Momentum Theory?
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#4
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
No offense to Cornell, but aren't there more important things to be studying?

Nah, everything is equally meaningless and futile.

So with that in mind any study is as valid as any other.
#5
Quote by AnnihiSlateR
Nah, everything is equally meaningless and futile.

So with that in mind any study is as valid as any other.

What if I don't believe in nihilism? WHAT THEN?!
#8
Quote by AnnihiSlateR
Then you are either lying to yourself, or haven't thought about it.

Existential Nihilism FTW!!!

Get this ANUS crap out here.