#1
Evening y'all.

Simple question: How do YOU jam?

As in, do you try out various methods, do you play on top of songs, alternate tunings, whatever really? I'm just curious to see the different styles of jammin', and always willing to try/learn new stuff.

Share!

Cheers.
#2
I really like improvised jamming and not really having starting point or really be thinking of anything. If my drummer just start's playing some beat warming up I will usually start playing whatever suite's the beat. Its a little hard to explain but if he does a groovy quick tempo then I can start right into it with mostly trial and error. I'm not very good when it comes to scales or modes or whatever but I can usually vibe off of whatever is being played. Same apply's for different tuning, whatever sounds good we will jam enough until we get tired of just doing one section then we will decide what other riff's work and eventually come up with a song. All in all it's trial and error.
Its time for tea.
#3
I usually just start making noise until i find a nice chord or melodic concept, mess around with melody and tie it into another chord/scale embellishment, and just kind of build something from the ground up. Once i have a foundation i'll get into the actual composition aspect of it. It really just depends on my mood and what i want to hear from my guitar. Only you really know what you want to hear, the only thing you can do is find out exactly what it is through hours of working to get there through trial and error. You gotta dig in and dare to be stupid man.
#4
Get stoned and jam. No thinking, just play.
Quote by big-T

Based on the troll face team logo and the team name featuring a Jet, I assume Kalanz has joined.
#5
Definitely with the no thinking aspect. It really frustrates me when i have to talk to somebody to be able to get something down instead of just getting it down through actually playing.
#6
Usually I have my notebooks in front of me, in one notebook I have written down every song I've created. In the other notebook I have the major scale and natural minor scales written down. I mostly play powerchords so I don't have to worry about playing minor or major chords as much altho I know how to if need be.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#7
So....What do you mean by "jamming"? Perhaps this word has acquired a new meaning among you younger lads..
To me, to "Jam", to have a "Jam Session", is to play in an improvisatory manner with other musicians. We have a local folk school that has weekly jams... I go occasionally. Maybe 5-6 other guys... We just trade songs. The guys not singing play rythym, add fills, take solos if they like. Trade things around... Very loose.
#8
I take a guitar that is acoustically loud for scalar - eg my tricone - and mostly noodle around on variations on pentatonic scales. They last jam I did, I didn't take a guitar, and played grungy lapsteel through an OCD on a three-string cigar box. - The action was too high for spanish position.
#9
I listen.

If it's just me, then I listen to myself, what I want and feel at the time, and just start playing. There are many different ways stuff can spontaneously start, but only if you listen. And I don't mean hear. I mean listen, and pay attention.

I will sometimes jam on my own, sometimes over music playing, and in both cases, it's more about listening than doing.

If I play with other people, it's all about listening to them, and adapting to them. Whatever style they play. That requires that they telegraph the changes well though.

That's why some jazz irritates me, because it leads you on in one direction, and then goes some other way completely. Just following a chart though, is not listening. But knowing off by heart the tune, and where it is going to go, and listening to what others are doing works.

I think in most things, and music is no different, people are always so concerned with action, with what they should be doing, with doing, with "how do you do that?" and in some ways, that makes a lot of sense, but in other ways, "doing" I think should be a lot more sort of reaction, allowing to happen, than it is to act, if you know what I mean.

Pure freedom and pure honesty, and really listening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCxMYC5I3Nc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yN1o51iuWUY

I know those are about fighting, but I think it is the same for music. One guy might have practiced some fancy flourish, and they just want to play it to show it off, and wait for the right chord or whatever, or try to build some logical reasoning of when to play what, a very "how to" attitude. "when can I play this?" "what can I play over chord x?" You know what I mean? And like he said, they could feel very cocky and powerful, and all that, with how fancy their playing is.

But I think that what you want to do, is to train, to understand the instrument, and the sounds it makes, and wield that power, so that you may listen, and instinctively react with pure honesty, and dance to the music you hear.

You can get better and better at that as time goes on, and learning from others is great, learning about outlooks on music and how it works, is great. But ultimately, it is, to me, just listening and reaction.

Even if you play a set piece. If you are not listening, and feeling, and reacting, then it will sound cold and robotic. Just a task you completed, rather than the expression of an artist.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Sep 12, 2014,
#10
I take an Ambien, wait 45 minutes, then put my ear to the back of my acoustic guitar and walk through the house letting the natural vibrations come through, then i get a voice recorder and vocalize the melody i get. I might hook a mic into an amp so my neighbors can hear me sing my melody.
#11
Quote by amsterdamankl
I usually just start making noise until i find a nice chord or melodic concept, mess around with melody and tie it into another chord/scale embellishment, and just kind of build something from the ground up. Once i have a foundation i'll get into the actual composition aspect of it. It really just depends on my mood and what i want to hear from my guitar. Only you really know what you want to hear, the only thing you can do is find out exactly what it is through hours of working to get there through trial and error. You gotta dig in and dare to be stupid man.


thats pretty much what I do. You can start with one nice chord and try to find another chord to go with it etc

I wrote this from scratch yesterday. The ending changes tonality etc and gets into some nice hypnotic fingerpicking. But it all started with just the first couple of chords

http://www.wikiloops.com/backingtrack-jam-23823.php
#12
Jamming, to me, is what happens when I get together with other people and just play whatever comes to mind. Sometimes we do that at band practice, that's where a lot of the ideas came from for songs that ended up on the set list. Whatever pops into your head, start to play it. Sometimes the other guys already know it and join in, sometimes we have t0o stop and sort things out, figure out chords and so forth.

When I play at home by myself, I just start playing, whatever pops into my head. Sometimes I finger pick, sometimes with a pick, sometimes in open G or drop D, and at some point I'll sit there, blank my mind and just doodle. Chords, riffs, whatever, just doodle and sometimes something will develop that I can improve on and it will eventually evolve into a song.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#13
It depends on what I'm trying to do. Sometimes I'll just play though some songs, run through scales and practice speed and dexterity for 5 mins at a time. I might just noodle while I'm watching a movie. Often, I'll start messing with various chord shapes and open strings, and put ideas together. If I have something I might want to use, I'll record it on my phone, upload it to my SoundCloud account, and share it from there to band members, or whoever I'm collaborating with.
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#14
I like to play electric guitar tabs on the acoustic. Sounds weird, but it's actually pretty cool!
#15
I practice on acoustic most of the time, electric songs included. Learn a lead on an acoustic and when I switch to the Strat it's no problem to iron out the wrinkles. Went to band practice last night and we did everything on acoustics, including several electric songs, we do that fairly often. Last 3 times at band practice were all acoustic. Sometimes we won't even set up mics or small PA, just acoustic guitars and vocals. Bass player has an acoustic bass so it works, and he can use the electric too and just keep it to acoustic guitar volume level. I've also transposed several piano songs to acoustic over the years, we might be adding one or two of those to the set list before long.

I always recommend practicing on an acoustic. Most are more difficult to play, because of the heavier strings if nothing else, so it makes you work for it. Switch to electric and the rest is no problem. I always learn new songs on acoustic for that reason. Also don't have to drag out wires, amp, pedals...just pick up the guitar. I keep light gauge strings on mine for leads onstage, and have a pretty decent setup if I want to amplify it too, plus a Fender Champ if I want to grab an electric and make some noise.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#16
I've only been playing 9 months so I know about 20 songs that I can play semi-decently. To "jam" I jus take the easiest ones with the simplest chord changes and vary the strumming patterns and speed up the chord changes, maybe throw in a few suspended notes just for fun.