#1
Hello I was listening songs by Nat King Cole and saw the guitarist holding a nice looking guitar but I was wondering what kind of model it is and what brand. I'm sure it isn't a Gibson, Epiphone and Gretsch. I'm looking at D'angelico guitar's and i'm leaning a bit towards them, but it still looks a bit different from all said brands.

I've included a picture of the guitar, but for best viewing you can find it on 2 youtube video's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0XJCJ1Srw

And here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCYApJtsyd0

The head is very specific, it got a lot of details. I can't find information on what kind of guitar he (John Collins) is playing by searching details about him on the internet. Hopefully you can find out which guitar that is, would love to know!!

Thanks in advanced!
Greets, Tom
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Last edited by tommyfirewire at Sep 13, 2014,
#4
That screen shot looks very much like it says VOX on the headstock - they used to be pretty serious in the instrument scene as well as amps but they've died off a lot in recent times
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#6
Quote by doive
That screen shot looks very much like it says VOX on the headstock - they used to be pretty serious in the instrument scene as well as amps but they've died off a lot in recent times


Yeah, the signs look likes a sign of Vox, but I can't find any type of VOX guitars that resemble it. But you are right, I think the sign on the head does resemble letters, I thought they were ornaments. That makes the search a bit easier thanks. Still looking tho.
#7
It looks very much like one of Epiphone's old classic archtop electrics. They were very popular in those days. The headstock inlay is probably the vine/tree/whatever that Epiphone loved to put on its high-end electrics.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#9
Looks similar to an Epiphone emperor. They have a great old school look to them. very classy. The Epiphones have a more exaggerated waist than the Gretsch or Gibsons at the time. Check out a Gibson Byrdland too. Thanks for the heads up fat gear.
#10
I have a '39 Epiphone Emperor. That's not it.
It's not a Gibson. I have an ES-5 (which has three pickups, by the way) and an L6S (what's an LS-6?) None of those. Definitely not a Gretsch or a Byrdland.

I'm voting Stromberg.
#11
Quote by dspellman
It's not a Gibson. I have an ES-5 (which has three pickups, by the way) and an L6S (what's an LS-6?) None of those. Definitely not a Gretsch or a Byrdland.

Excuse the mistake. I meant to say L-5. I might as well clear that, though I was wrong, anyway.
#12
Quote by Harmosis
It's a Stromberg. Those were real nice.


Quote by dspellman
I have a '39 Epiphone Emperor. That's not it.
It's not a Gibson. I have an ES-5 (which has three pickups, by the way) and an L6S (what's an LS-6?) None of those. Definitely not a Gretsch or a Byrdland.

I'm voting Stromberg.


Thanks guys! Yeah I think it's a Stromberg too, I fell in love with the sound of it. There were only about 640 made and if you find one are extremely expensive.

I've crossed referenced it with a photograph I found on past listings on ebay, with Irving Ashby (the guy playing in the video, so not Phil Collins) playing the guitar:
http://www.operarex.com/Fotos4/J5583%20copia.jpg
The guitar is very similar with that on the video's. Knowing now that Stromberg guitars are Archtop acoustics, he plays with a pickup, altho in the photo there are two bridges (1 pickup right?).
He plays a Cutaway, which are very rare, and it is probably a Stromberg master 400, according to the research I've done The head doesn't match other models, but with a google search some headstock graphics seems to be rare and seem to vary a little bit from guitar to guitar.

Man those guitars are killer, wish I had one.

Other pictures of the Stromberg with the cutaway: http://invention.smithsonian.org/centerpieces/electricguitar/pop-ups/01-08.htm

http://www.myjazzhome.com/stromberg.shtml

This is a different version of the guitar he plays, also a master 400 but without the cutaway which still survived: http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_606740

Thank you guys, I'm happy to know which brand it is, can now die in peace :P
If you have more information on this guitar or make corrections or if you find out it is not a Stromberg guitar at all, let me know

Also what should I buy as an alternative to Strombergs? Maybe a D'Angelico?
#13
Depends on what you want out of the guitar- looks? Sound? Investment?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
Quote by chrismendiola
Excuse the mistake. I meant to say L-5. I might as well clear that, though I was wrong, anyway.


One of Nat Cole's guitar players DID play an L-5, however, so you're not all that far out of the ballpark.
#15
Quote by tommyfirewire
Thanks guys! Yeah I think it's a Stromberg too, I fell in love with the sound of it. There were only about 640 made and if you find one are extremely expensive.
Thank you guys, I'm happy to know which brand it is, can now die in peace :P
If you have more information on this guitar or make corrections or if you find out it is not a Stromberg guitar at all, let me know

Also what should I buy as an alternative to Strombergs? Maybe a D'Angelico?


These folks often used Gibson Super 400s and L5s, Epiphone Emperors and a number of other jazz guitars. Oscar Moore (original guitar player with Nat's trio) probably did more to popularize this style than anyone.

If I were you, I'd look up the Jazz Guitar forum (there's one out there somewhere) and start reading; they'll undoubtedly have alternatives. Worth noting that it was really the guitarists more than the guitar that got the results you're hearing. Most of them were wooed by the big guitar companies as endorsers, so they may have played (and got paid for playing) several different brands in their careers depending on whose contract was up, etc.
#16
Hi Danny and dspellman, i'm looking to invest about a maximum of a thousand bucks. I don't necessarily need a A Brand, such as Gibson, i've heard guitars which has a superb quality and sometimes even a bit better then an A Brand, I find Heritage guitars nicer looking, better in sound and they are much cheaper then Gibson. Heritage is still expensive for me tho.
I'm now looking at Peerless, really love the unique sound. Looking at the Leela 40 and the Wizard Costum guitar.

I'm also looking at Buscarino guitars, even with a single pickup they sound superb.
Tho I prefer one with two pickups and a unique sound is very important.

D'Angelico is also very nice looking, and sounds great. I love the EX-59 and EX-175, on the 59 I would put a Bigsby on it. With these I would go over budget, if it was just a bit lower priced.

How does the older Epiphone Emperor models (40's, 50's) compare to new Emperor Models? Love the sound, but I was wondering if the sound quality has decreased somewhat over the years.

So I want a guitar wich sounds open, clear but can also sound a bit rough, a unique sound and warm. For Jazz, Classical and Rock.

I'm listening to some Oscar Moore Records and i'm wondering why he didn't got the fame he had, being so improvising and for ahead for that decade, he has some recordings where he pretty much play's Rockabilly music, and that before the genre.

I'm also checking out some Jazz forums, thanks guys! And you're right, the player makes the sound!
Last edited by tommyfirewire at Sep 15, 2014,
#17
Not quite as inexpensive as $1000, but I can't help but recommend the Reverend and Godin hollowbodies. Most of them are between $1000-2000 new, but can be found on eBay and Reverb in the $900-1500 used or as limited time discounts.

http://www.reverendguitars.com/category/guitar/ http://www.godinguitars.com/godin5thaveseriesp.htm
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Sep 15, 2014,
#18
Quote by doive
That screen shot looks very much like it says VOX on the headstock - they used to be pretty serious in the instrument scene as well as amps but they've died off a lot in recent times



Wow, the power of suggestion. When I read this and looked back at the still shot I swore it also read "VOX"
#19
Quote by tommyfirewire

How does the older Epiphone Emperor models (40's, 50's) compare to new Emperor Models? Love the sound, but I was wondering if the sound quality has decreased somewhat over the years.


Not even close. For starters, it was a completely different company and not only was it NOT a part of Gibson, the two companies were fierce competitors. The Emperor arrived almost simultaneously with Gibson's Super 400 (named after what it cost to buy one, a lot of money in the late '30's, early '40's -- it would correspond to around $6700 today. Average annual salary was $1850, a car averaged $700). The Super 400 was supposed to have been Gibson's flagship guitar. Whether there was some corporate espionage going on or not, Gibson was stunned to find the Emperor had trumped them in almost every respect, including size, power, bracing design, etc. The Emperor was arguably the best big band "cannon" ever built. Gibson *hated* Epiphone. When they were able to buy the Epiphone brand after the company fell on hard times, they made it part of the corporate culture to always keep Epiphone a second rate (in their eyes) guitar model.

These days Epiphones are largely built in China. There were a number of Epiphone Emperor Regents built in Japan, however. If you can find one, buy it.



Quote by tommyfirewire
I'm listening to some Oscar Moore Records and i'm wondering why he didn't got the fame he had, being so improvising and for ahead for that decade, he has some recordings where he pretty much play's Rockabilly music, and that before the genre.


Oscar Moore is generally acknowledged as one of the most influential guitarists in jazz history, pioneering the jazz chord formations that most jazz players use now. He never had the success he had with Nat Cole after leaving that trio, and he eventually gave up music altogether and became a bricklayer. I think he died around 1981. He deserved so much more.