#1
So I have a problem with painted necks, and this has probably been asked before, but if I were to sand down the paint on the neck of a guitar with a lighter grit sandpaper, would it affect the playing or hurt the wood in any way?
#2
It will affect playability depending on how much you sand, but yes, sanding off the gloss will affect the feel of the guitar quite radically.

Are you just talking about making the gloss finish satin, or are you actually considering removing the finish altogether? If you're just sanitizing the finish, it won't harm the neck in any way. All you'd be doing is putting fine scratches into the clearcoat, you're not sanding away the neck itself.

If you actually are removing the finish altogether, then you must protect the neck with a grain filler and a sealer of some kind.
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#3
Pretty much what TooDeep said... his last comment has to do with the fact that bare wood is more susceptible to humidity changes, of particular concern is the wood drying out. So it becomes even more important to maintain proper humidity.

Maple is not very porous, so grain filler is not needed. Mahogany is, but if you are sanding off the finish, chances are that the pores will still be filled with varnish. Some people use some type of oil as a sealer, but if it is kept properly humidified, it isn't necessary. Over time the natural oils from your skin will work into the wood.
#4
Quote by dylandempsey6
So I have a problem with painted necks, and this has probably been asked before, but if I were to sand down the paint on the neck of a guitar with a lighter grit sandpaper, would it affect the playing or hurt the wood in any way?


If you're running into a problem with your thumb sticking on the back of a painted neck on a NEW guitar, there are two solutions:

Play it some more (the process of playing puts microscratches in the paint, and that reduces the surface tension that causes your issue). That surface tension is working something like the way a gecko sticks to a wall.

The second solution is to take a green scotchbrite pad and gently work it over the neck lengthwiseuntil you have a more satiny finish. Don't overdo it, and don't use sandpaper (which will generally remove more material).

Never remove the finish from a neck to increase its playability. After a while you'll end up with a dry-rotted noodle that won't hold tune.
#5
Honestly, it's not something I would do myself if I wasn't familiar with guitars and woodwork. A year or so ago I took one of my guitars with a painted maple/mahogony neck to my local guitar shop and asked the tech there what he could do. He refinished most of the neck with gun stock oil after taking off most of the paint, and it plays brilliantly. Can't speak for just sanding off a little of the paint though.
#6
Another option is to simply have the back of the neck of the guitar hosed down with a satin lacquer. That'll certainly solve the problem.
#7
The first I want to say is that I own everything from gloss necks to satin finished to oiled maple necks. I simply can not understand how someone could deem a gloss neck such a big problem. Or a problem at all. How are you playing to make that a problem? Sure, they all feel very different, but I just can't see how it can be so big of a problem that someone would do an irreversible damage to a guitar.

Instead of doing such a drastic modification as sanding a neck, why would you buy a guitar with a gloss finished neck in the first place? There are more satin finished ones on the market than I can count.

The finish is there for a reason, to protect the neck from changes in the environment and humidity that can ruin the wood. There needs to be something that protects the wood.
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#8
Use 0000 steel wool.. Buff it a little to smooth the finish some and try it out. I had to do that to one of my guitars a few years ago, it took about 5 minutes with steel wool.
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#9
I haven't done it myself but I have read several times on other sites what dspellman mentions. Go to a store (grocery or hardware) and get the green Scotchbrite pads. You can usually find them in any grocery store in the same place they sell Brillo etc.

From a Gibson forum:
"On my LP, Dot and G400, I rubbed the back of the neck with a "Scotchbrite" pad; you know, one of those sponges that have the one side that is green colored. Just rub it on the back of the neck and it will take off the top layer of gloss and leave a silky feeling satin-type finish. It is really smooth after doing this. One of the best things I ever did to my guitars. You can also use steel wool or sandpaper, but the scotchbrite works great!"
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 17, 2014,
#10
Quote by HomerSGR
The first I want to say is that I own everything from gloss necks to satin finished to oiled maple necks. I simply can not understand how someone could deem a gloss neck such a big problem. Or a problem at all.


Honestly, I'm sort of in the same boat. I've always had gloss necks and have never had a problem playing the guitar. My latest guitar (Variax JTV-89F) has a satin-finished neck (satin polysomethingorother), and while it's nice, I would have been just as happy with gloss.


On the other hand, I've seen some Gibsons that were just incredibly sticky; I think there was something very badly done with the nitrocellulose lacquer, or maybe the people playing them were seriously sweaty.
#11
Quote by HomerSGR
The first I want to say is that I own everything from gloss necks to satin finished to oiled maple necks. I simply can not understand how someone could deem a gloss neck such a big problem. Or a problem at all. How are you playing to make that a problem? Sure, they all feel very different, but I just can't see how it can be so big of a problem that someone would do an irreversible damage to a guitar.



Press your thumb lightly against window glass and glide it on it. Cant be certain about you but you may notice how the glass is surprisingly grippy. To some glossy necks are just like that. The skin on their thumbs grips on the glassy polished surface and resists movement.

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