#1
Hello, I didn't know if I should ask this in this section or in the acoustic guitar section, so I'll just put it here.

Let me start off with a little background. I've been playing guitar for 5/6 years, I had another thread on here about something else. Anyway, a few years ago I was taught how to play Dust In The Wind by Kansas - that's my only experience with fingerpicking other than what I've been trying to do these past couple of months or so. A while back I discovered a bunch of fingerstyle guitarists on Youtube and only just a couple months ago I was inspired to try and learn the style, because I felt emotionally connected to all of the music that I had heard using it.

So, what I started off doing first was trying to learn the song Rylynn by Andy McKee. Now, I got the intro down fairly good, but the only issue was that I wasn't using the correct technique essentially making the rest of the song near impossible to play. I was using only my thumb to strum the strings. So, the past few days I've just been trying to figure out and setup a nice routine I can use for several different techniques.

I wanted to know what sorts of techniques I should learn - I only know what a few are such as 'Nail Attack'. The only thing I've actually been working at is making my thumb independent from my fingers, but I wanted some advice on that. If you go to this:

http://music.stackexchange.com/questions/3754/how-to-start-learning-fingerstyle-guitar

I was looking at the second answer down. The guy is explaining an exercise that Tommy Emmanuel explained before (he actually linked to a video in his answer). So, I'm able to get down the first two parts, but when it comes to the adding the extra 'attack' I always get off beat.

Really, I just wanted to know if anyone had some tips on improving that? And also what other techniques I should work at and how I should go about doing it. This is all for pretty much a beginner in the fingerstyle area of guitar. Thank you for reading!
#3
When I started out, it was what folks were calling "Travis Picking". Actually had little to do with what Merle Travis was playing, but was in fact "pattern picking". The basic folk-music style syncopated picking method. Listen to Dylan's "Don't Think Twice"... That's it.

From there, you start adding stuff. Bass runs, single-note runs, moving chord-forms up and down the neck.
Eventually, you realize that this won't take you where you need to go, so you start to work with what is essentially classical guitar technique.
I'm playing fingerstyle jazz currently, and the technique is almost all derived from classical guitar technique. Chord-forms are played with three fingers and the thumb, and single-note lines are handled in my case with alternating thumb and ring finger for the most part.
More advanced players use the classical tremolo technique and adapt that to single-note lines.

Here's an excellent page by Tuck Andress on the theory of doing all this well:
http://www.tuckandpatti.com/pick-finger_tech.html#2
#4
Quote by Bikewer

Eventually, you realize that this won't take you where you need to go, so you start to work with what is essentially classical guitar technique.
I'm playing fingerstyle jazz currently, and the technique is almost all derived from classical guitar technique. Chord-forms are played with three fingers and the thumb, and single-note lines are handled in my case with alternating thumb and ring finger for the most part.
More advanced players use the classical tremolo technique and adapt that to single-note lines.

Here's an excellent page by Tuck Andress on the theory of doing all this well:
http://www.tuckandpatti.com/pick-finger_tech.html#2


This is fantastic advice - get a hold of some beginner classical guitar exercises and pay close attention to right hand fingering - be meticulous about it at first - learn basic arpeggio and scale exercises and then tackle some tunes, like Bouree from Bach - which is a great tune for finger independence. Prelude in D minor ( for the penultimate Fugue in A minor) from Bach is a great arpeggio tune.

It's crucial to get the basic right hand approach right - from there everything gets much easier. At first - pay close attention to making sure you always use the exact same right hand fingerings every time you play a tune - this will speed up progress.

Once you have some basics down I would encourage learning some Don Ross, which is a (slightly) more approachable version of Andy McKee ( one of his main influences as well). Check out Bearing Straight, the self titled "Don Ross", and "This Dragon won't sleep" . There are some great tunes there. He sells the tabs through his website. "King Street Suite" from him is a great beginner fingerstyle tune. Most of his tunes are actually easier to play than they appear.
#5
Quote by reverb66
This is fantastic advice - get a hold of some beginner classical guitar exercises and pay close attention to right hand fingering - be meticulous about it at first - learn basic arpeggio and scale exercises and then tackle some tunes, like Bouree from Bach - which is a great tune for finger independence. Prelude in D minor ( for the penultimate Fugue in A minor) from Bach is a great arpeggio tune.

It's crucial to get the basic right hand approach right - from there everything gets much easier. At first - pay close attention to making sure you always use the exact same right hand fingerings every time you play a tune - this will speed up progress.

Once you have some basics down I would encourage learning some Don Ross, which is a (slightly) more approachable version of Andy McKee ( one of his main influences as well). Check out Bearing Straight, the self titled "Don Ross", and "This Dragon won't sleep" . There are some great tunes there. He sells the tabs through his website. "King Street Suite" from him is a great beginner fingerstyle tune. Most of his tunes are actually easier to play than they appear.

Interesting. Yeah, that's mainly what I'm trying to do - gain finger independence.

So, let me try and put this to perspective. I already know a bunch of scale and arpeggio exercises; are you saying to try and play them with a classical guitar technique? And then learn some songs such as Bouree from Bach that use the classical technique, because they're helpful in gaining thumb and finger independence? And then after I feel comfortable with it all I should tackle some basic fingerstyle songs such as some Don Ross (whom I love by the way)? Also, do you have any specific classical guitar exercises I should try out?

Also, when you say classical guitar - is it mandatory that I have the guitar in that position used while playing it? I don't think it is, but I just thought I'd ask.

Thanks a bunch.
#6
Quote by GloatenFree
Interesting. Yeah, that's mainly what I'm trying to do - gain finger independence.

So, let me try and put this to perspective. I already know a bunch of scale and arpeggio exercises; are you saying to try and play them with a classical guitar technique? And then learn some songs such as Bouree from Bach that use the classical technique, because they're helpful in gaining thumb and finger independence? And then after I feel comfortable with it all I should tackle some basic fingerstyle songs such as some Don Ross (whom I love by the way)? Also, do you have any specific classical guitar exercises I should try out?

Also, when you say classical guitar - is it mandatory that I have the guitar in that position used while playing it? I don't think it is, but I just thought I'd ask.

Thanks a bunch.


Google beginner classical guitar arpeggio exercises and you should be able to find some - they aren't the same as typical arpeggio exercises. normally they involve basic diminished or augmented chord voicing ( gibberish chord really) on the upper four strings and playing the E open , A open , and D string with your thumb, with the three fretted upper strings plucked with your index, Middle and ring fingers. You then play every conceivable pattern, varying accents etc. For scales you could look up the Segovia scales - G major pattern will pretty much do it - again, the important thing is the right hand alternating finger pattern ( index and middle finger mostly).

It's not mandatory to sit with a classical posture, but for the tougher tunes it's pretty much necessary ( wide stretches etc.).

You can start tackling Don Ross right away, but make sure you spend some time on those arpeggio exercises - they really pay off in the long run.
#7
Quote by reverb66
Google beginner classical guitar arpeggio exercises and you should be able to find some - they aren't the same as typical arpeggio exercises. normally they involve basic diminished or augmented chord voicing ( gibberish chord really) on the upper four strings and playing the E open , A open , and D string with your thumb, with the three fretted upper strings plucked with your index, Middle and ring fingers. You then play every conceivable pattern, varying accents etc. For scales you could look up the Segovia scales - G major pattern will pretty much do it - again, the important thing is the right hand alternating finger pattern ( index and middle finger mostly).

It's not mandatory to sit with a classical posture, but for the tougher tunes it's pretty much necessary ( wide stretches etc.).

You can start tackling Don Ross right away, but make sure you spend some time on those arpeggio exercises - they really pay off in the long run.


Alright. Thanks for the advice, it'll definitely come in handy.