#1
Hi, I recently adquired my first bass, an Ibanez SR305, it's as the topic title says, a 34" scale bass with 5 strings. I like it a lot, it's very comfortable and sounds great, I'm having a great time with it.

But I have a doubt... is the B string supposed to be a bit floopy? I don't think it's waaay too floppy but it's not as stiff as the other 4 strings...

I tried to practice slap as soon as I get it cause I've always wanted to learn that thecnique, and well... it's harder than it looks hahaha but I feel the B string vibrates more than for example if I slap the E string...

I just want to know if this is normal cause I've read that the B string vibrates at 30 hz and because of that it's normal that it moves more than the others and that why it is a bit floppy...

Or if this is something I should be worried about... or if I should just change the B string gauge for a bigger one.

Rightnow I can't remember cause I'm at work but I think the B string is .130... should I change it to .135 o .145?

And if that is an option, should I change all the strings gauge? or can I change just the B string?

I hope I just need to change the B one cause... and dont want to recalibrate my bass hahaha

Thanks guys for taking your time reading me and I hope someone can help me

Have a nice day pals!
#2
Bass strings are (5th string) B0=30.87Hz, (4th string) E1=41.20Hz, A1=55Hz, D2=73.42Hz, G2=98Hz.

Normal strings for a 34" 5-string run about 45-65-80-100-130, sometimes 45-65-85-105-135, etc.

It's possible someone has replaced just *some* of the strings at some point, or that the strings need replacing now.

Replace them as a SET, not one at a time.

Did you buy this as a new bass or used. Was it hanging on a wall for a while, or is it fresh from the box? If you're buying a new bass, you'll often want to change the strings immediately. It's a bass, so you won't have to change them very often, but I usually like to start out with a "known quantity" when it comes to strings...
#3
It's a brand new, not an exhibition one , come out straight from it's box
is this one
http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/eb_page14.php?year=2014&area_id=2&cat_id=2&series_id=51&data_id=175&color=CL02

Now, the quality control label on it is from 2013, the last year and I received just the last week. It came stringed with a set of elixir strings and already calibrated and intonated.

So, this bass was finished april of the past year if I'm not mistaken, do you think this could have affected the B string?
If I change the strings, should I use the same gauge or should I try a higher one?
Last edited by carpercen at Sep 17, 2014,
#4
34" scale 5ers require lighter touch than their 35" scale cousins especially when comes to Ibanez SR series basses.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#5
Quote by dark Mass
34" scale 5ers require lighter touch than their 35" scale cousins especially when comes to Ibanez SR series basses.



O.o
I am sure i didn't understand that...

could you explain me please?
#6
Quote by carpercen
O.o
I am sure i didn't understand that...

could you explain me please?

Most 34" scale 5ers have a slightly floppier B string compared to their 35" scale cousins.

So you need to learn how to play smoother and not forcing the B string to vibrate. Also you want to change how much "thumb" you use when slapping.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#8
Quote by Spaz91
A quick fix might be to get a heavier gauge B string.


That's what I was wondering!

What I'd like to know is if I can change only the B string or if I must change all the strings...

is something wrong if I only change the B?
#9
Its considered good practice to change out all the strings. By changing the whole set you keep the wear and tear on your strings relatively even. It's easier to keep track of and replace a whole set that's dying at regular intervals then to be practicing/gigging/recording and having to worry about one string or another because they all have differing amounts of wear and use.

If your strings are relatively new and/or cost is an issue (bass strings are expensive) you could probably find a heavier gauge single B and be alright, but you shouldn't make it a regular thing to replace one string at a time.
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#11
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Something that will also help- when restringing, wrap the string from the top of the post to the bottom. It may not seem like it'll make much difference, but it does.


mmm I did't understand that man! Sry... but what do you mean by top? the tunners?
#12
Hi Guys!

I went to the music store of my city... and sadly the higher gauge they sell is .130...

and that's the only store here in my place... so I guess i'll have to get used to my floppy string... or maybe i'll try a brand new .130 to see what happens...
#13
I actually am having this problem too, I got an sr 256 six string and my band tunes down to drop Ab. I really don't like the floppiness lol. I've been thinking about this idea but im not sure if it would work. I want to replace my bridge with a monorail bridge, but I want to put the bridge on at an angle so that the first string is normal 34" length, and that the sixth string would be simulating about 35". I don't know if this idea would work really because ive never done any work like that to a guitar/bass lol
#14
Quote by guitarnick96
I actually am having this problem too, I got an sr 256 six string and my band tunes down to drop Ab. I really don't like the floppiness lol. I've been thinking about this idea but im not sure if it would work. I want to replace my bridge with a monorail bridge, but I want to put the bridge on at an angle so that the first string is normal 34" length, and that the sixth string would be simulating about 35". I don't know if this idea would work really because ive never done any work like that to a guitar/bass lol


You could replace your bridge with some kind of multi-scale thing like that... Or you could just put use a heavier string. Get a .140 or .145. That should do it.
#15
Quote by guitarnick96
I want to replace my bridge with a monorail bridge, but I want to put the bridge on at an angle so that the first string is normal 34" length, and that the sixth string would be simulating about 35". I don't know if this idea would work really because ive never done any work like that to a guitar/bass lol

That won't work unless you plan on only using open strings, the frets are spaced based on the scale length so if you move the bridge all the frets will be off.
#16
Quote by guitarnick96
I actually am having this problem too, I got an sr 256 six string and my band tunes down to drop Ab. I really don't like the floppiness lol. I've been thinking about this idea but im not sure if it would work. I want to replace my bridge with a monorail bridge, but I want to put the bridge on at an angle so that the first string is normal 34" length, and that the sixth string would be simulating about 35". I don't know if this idea would work really because ive never done any work like that to a guitar/bass lol



I've mentioned this before. There's NO reason for the bassist to tune down with the guitarists. In fact, it's just crazy. There's nothing out there that will reproduce the frequencies generated and all you'll get is some buzzy harmonics at much higher values. The guitar players themselves can't reproduce fundamentals in that region and you simply don't get "heavier" when you've passed the point of audibility. At some point, downtuning comes afoul of the laws of physics and gets stupid. Mind if I ask what kind of bass amp and bass cabinet you're using?

You're not going to be able to extend the bridge without changing the scale (as you say, to 35"), and if you change the scale you also have to change the distance between each individual fret or the whole bass will be out of intonation.

This is possible (and done) with multiscale guitars, and there ARE multiscale basses out there ("fan fret"), but notice on all of those that the distance between each individual fret changes as does the overall scale -- you can't have one without the other.

This is a Dingwall Afterburner -- six string multiscale fanfret done right.

Last edited by dspellman at Sep 18, 2014,
#17
wait D:
Mine is 34"!
I just have to put a higher gauge right?
Right now my B string is a .130 gauge
will I see a noticeable difference if I try a .135? or it will be a minor difference?
What I mean... should I try to get a .145? or a .135 will handle the issue?
#18
Give DR Strings "DDT" set a try. "DDT" stands for "Drop Down Tuning," so they are made to have a better tension despite lower tunings. They may be just what you are looking for.

As a result of some magic that no one seems to understand, some 34" scale five-string basses have a tight "B" string, while others do not. It is one of those cosmic things that you encounter when speaking to bassists who refer to everyone as "Cat," and somehow can actually pull that off.

We are indeed a weird lot, we bassists...
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#19
Quote by FatalGear41
Give DR Strings "DDT" set a try. "DDT" stands for "Drop Down Tuning," so they are made to have a better tension despite lower tunings. They may be just what you are looking for.

As a result of some magic that no one seems to understand, some 34" scale five-string basses have a tight "B" string, while others do not. It is one of those cosmic things that you encounter when speaking to bassists who refer to everyone as "Cat," and somehow can actually pull that off.

We are indeed a weird lot, we bassists...


DR Strings DDT?
I don't think I can buy them here in México :/... But I found a guy selling the elixir nanoweb .135 set for 5 strings... what do you think? should I try them?
My B string is .130, do you think that .135 will fix the problem?
#20