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#1
Hey All,

This question below is just hypothetical....I was just thinking about it.

So lets say you have a certain guitar...let's say a Tele.

You hear some nice blues licks you want to try out.

The current guitar amp combo that you have doesn't have the flavor you would like to match those blues licks you heard. (might sound a little too thin, light, twangy, bango-ee...airy...etc.

So you look around and you see they have blues pedals.

then upon looking around some more you see they have "blues amps"

Do I really need both if I want the sweet velvet, slightly crunchy, raspy, soul voice sounds I am trying to achieve?

Or would I need another "blues guitar, (like a semi hollow archtop) + the blues driver pedal, + the blues amp????
#2
Honestly, you can play whatever on anything. The things like your phrasing, how you approach vibrato will remain constant so if you play something in a 'bluesy' fashion, it will sound bluesy regardless.


That being said, chasing a specific tone and not a genre is completely different and requires more consideration to your chain (your pickup choices, pedal and amp choices).


So what are you asking? What is a 'blues tone' to you?
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Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#3
A tele can get great blues tones - use the neck pickup. You don't need pedals for blues, you just need a decent tube amp. It's not enough to get the amp, but it also needs to be cranked loud enough to get the right tone.

That being said, I can even get decent blues tones out of my Roland MicroCube when I set it right with lots of reverb and a slightly dirty clean tone.
#4
Stevie Ray Vaughan said it best...
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by Cajundaddy
Stevie Ray Vaughan said it best...

Yeah, probably went something like this:
"Hey, Rene, can you build me a splitter so I can play all 6 of these Dumbles at the same time?"

There are a lot of ways to skin a cat. You can get what you want by any number of different pieces or combinations of gear. Technique is not a piece of gear, but most of us probably understand that.

The original question doesn't make a ton of sense to me, it seems too vaguely theoretical, but the short answer is that you don't "need" any one specific piece to get a sound. Sometimes it's the most efficient way, which is why we often suggest, say, a jazzbox for jazz, but you can get there however you like and there's no guarantees or requirements.

So to answer the actual question: No. You definitely don't need a specific piece of equipment for anything. If you're just starting out, focus on learning to play and the rest will come. If new gear helps you sound the way you want to, that's fine, but don't look to it as a solution to all your playing problems.
#6
If you want to sound your best for a particular genre, I'd recommend getting the ideal gear for that genre. The guitar, amp, and pedals will ALL contribute to your ideal tone. I'd have to say the amp makes the biggest difference, then pedals, then the guitar.

But for some genres, you don't even need pedals. I would say the guitar matters the least, but I just borrowed a Strat from my cousin and while I can play metal with it, I feel it really needs a bridge humbucker to get a satisfactory metal tone. No amount of amp EQing or gain adjustments can help it -- the bridge single coil just does not provide a nice metal response or tone. With the neck/middle pickup position selected, however, it sounds brilliant for blues lead tones. So yeah, the guitar does matter too.
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Last edited by KailM at Sep 17, 2014,
#7
Quote by Roc8995
Yeah, probably went something like this:
"Hey, Rene, can you build me a splitter so I can play all 6 of these Dumbles at the same time?"

There are a lot of ways to skin a cat. You can get what you want by any number of different pieces or combinations of gear. Technique is not a piece of gear, but most of us probably understand that.

The original question doesn't make a ton of sense to me, it seems too vaguely theoretical, but the short answer is that you don't "need" any one specific piece to get a sound. Sometimes it's the most efficient way, which is why we often suggest, say, a jazzbox for jazz, but you can get there however you like and there's no guarantees or requirements.



Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#8
SRV used a lot of different amps including a dozen different Fenders, Marshalls, and a few Dumbles. He also used a lot of different amp settings that changed over the years but he always sounded like Stevie. Some of the most ferocious blues on a Stratocaster ever played.
http://bluesrockguitar.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/en-wikipedia-org_wiki_srv_amps.pdf
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Yes, thanks, that was the point. Nobody is arguing with you, which is what makes this so annoying. Obviously technique means a lot, but someone very specifically asked about gear and its effect on sound. Showing up and saying "YES BUT YOUR TECHNIQUE MATTERS MOST" isn't wrong, it's just irrelevant to the question. This is the gear section, if you don't want to talk about gear go hang out in Guitar Techniques.

Otherwise every time you post something I'm going to argue with you that it's more important that you eat than practice, because obviously your technique more important than your gear, but you can't have technique if you starve to death. So we should all start posting about what we had for lunch because that's obviously relevant and crucial to every conversation about gear, just like technique is.

See why it's annoying?
#10
Ouch Roc!

I thought the SRV quote was entirely relevant to the OP title question in a guitar forum:
"Specific Tone...Is it the guitar, pedal or amp?? "

and:
"So you look around and you see they have blues pedals.
then upon looking around some more you see they have "blues amps"
Do I really need both if I want the sweet velvet, slightly crunchy, raspy, soul voice sounds I am trying to achieve?"

Apparently I have violated some unwritten UG Forum rule. You have my apology if I have been offensive with my opinions on guitar blues tone. Carry on.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
Reading is hard!

It's not about the rules, it's about an irrelevant answer to the post (not just the title, I know it's a lot of words but do try). Again, this is the gear section, Techniques is ^ that way if you want to talk about how to unlock the magic tone in your hands.

edit: I was wrong! It's in your soul. Silly me.
#12
As others have said, there are many ways of skinning the sonic cat, some more complicated than others. However, there is a major oversight implicit in your question - the guitar consists, among other things, of the fancy lump of wood and the pickups. IMO, the fancy lump of wood is mostly just that, the pickups are the major component of the guitar's contribution to tone.
#13
Surely it's everything. Amp and technique are the biggest part for me.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#14
Understood Roc. When I start explaining technique in here you can slap me down again.

I've studied Blues guitar all my life and while I do pay a lot of attention to the gear top players are using, I am also keenly interested in their thoughts about guitar tone. Guys like SRV, Guthrie Govan, Satch, BB King, and Robben Ford are all pretty clear that gear matters, but hands and ears matter more. Perspective from some of the greatest blues players of our time is always relevant to a Blues guitar tone discussion don't you think? I am willing to bet the TS is interested enough.

Great Blues guitar tone comes from the soul and is transmitted through our hands with the tools of our trade. It's not about technique at all. It's about perspective. Once a player really understands that, then choose your weapon. Any guitar could be a great Blues guitar if you can find your tone in there. That tone in your soul is what matters most.

Peace.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Sep 17, 2014,
#15
Which church should I attend to make sure that my soul has the best overdriven tones? I have noticed that a lot of churches have a high ceiling, does that correlate to my amp's headroom? Do I have to be a polytheist to get delay or reverb?

Maybe try posting on TGP, they love this mojo/spritual tone mumbo jumbo over there. Once more, though, since we're on UG:

Gear. Forum.
#16
I think I'm a lot better than I was 2 years ago. It's because I practiced and learnt how to phrase better not because of a spiritual entity within me.

Mood can inspire you to articulate your feelings through music, I agree with that completely. But if I didn't practice a lot, I wouldn't be able to do it to any degree at all.

Therefore, practice is the biggest factor for me to play what I hear in my head, not a soul. (I don't believe in a soul anyway.)
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#17
Yes, definitely. Practice and approach make a huge difference in how you sound.

But look at one of the pointed questions -
The current guitar amp combo that you have doesn't have the flavor you would like to match those blues licks you heard. (might sound a little too thin, light, twangy, bango-ee...airy...etc.
...
then upon looking around some more you see they have "blues amps"

This specifically asks about the guitar/amp combo. In answering the question, we can certainly mention technique, because it's important. But should we really ignore the actual question and focus entirely on a question that was not asked? The question wasn't about the biggest factor, it was about whether or not you need certain gear to sound a certain way. Talking about technique is useful but doesn't answer the question, directly or indirectly.
#18
Yea, I know. I was just answering his point.

But yea, OT: TS: What you need is a new amp.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#20
Tone for the soul!
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#21
Quote by ken styles
Hey All,

This question below is just hypothetical....I was just thinking about it.

So lets say you have a certain guitar...let's say a Tele.

You hear some nice blues licks you want to try out.

The current guitar amp combo that you have doesn't have the flavor you would like to match those blues licks you heard. (might sound a little too thin, light, twangy, bango-ee...airy...etc.

So you look around and you see they have blues pedals.

then upon looking around some more you see they have "blues amps"

Do I really need both if I want the sweet velvet, slightly crunchy, raspy, soul voice sounds I am trying to achieve?

Or would I need another "blues guitar, (like a semi hollow archtop) + the blues driver pedal, + the blues amp????


it really just depends

if you think the tele is too twangy that might be the tele's fault

but you could also have an amp whose tone you don't like (or pedals). etc. etc.

it's kind of a pain because you sort of have to look at all the individual pieces in case any of them are the problem, but at the same time consider the whole as well, because as colin rightly said there's more than one way to skin a cat.

Quote by Roc8995

Otherwise every time you post something I'm going to argue with you that it's more important that you eat than practice, because obviously your technique more important than your gear, but you can't have technique if you starve to death. So we should all start posting about what we had for lunch because that's obviously relevant and crucial to every conversation about gear, just like technique is.

See why it's annoying?


LOL

EDIT: I should add, normally I agree with cajundaddy and his posts are usually spot-on. but that was funny
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
I don't think it's any one thing, if we're just talking gear. All pieces of gear (whether it's pickups, wood of the guitar, amp, pedal, etc.) color the tone. So, you can't just point and go, "Try this pedal" or "Try that amp". Yes, trying said pedal or amp may get one closer to a certain tone. But it's not going to be exact. A pedal or an amp is a small part of the big picture.

This is why tone chasing is so tedious and should never be attempted.
#23
OK...Yes, technique, feel and soul matter, blues is more soul than anything else.

As far as gear goes, gear does matter too. Any guitar can make a good blues guitar, I've seen blues players use just about everything you can think of, including Flying V's. Strat, Tele, 335, Les Paul, you name it I've seen blues players playing it, about the only thing I haven't seen is the "metal" style guitars. Johnny Winter played a Gibson Firebird, BB King played a 335 for years then had gibson make him a solid body version to eliminate feedback. Vaughn played Strats, Albert King played Teles...

So any guitar can be a good blues guitar, my favorite of my setup is my Squier Strat, 2nd is the Cort CL1500 hollow body.

The amp makes more difference than the guitar does, and for blues, tube amps are the way to go, most blues players like Fenders. There again though, I've seen several other amps used.

Pedals are usually not needed much, but a good overdrive pedal might be useful. Other than that pedals are not usually a big part of most blues players' rigs. My Marshall Bluesbreaker is the only pedal I use for blues tunes, and I always have a Arion analog delay on, for one light echo, and I usually just leave it on but it's not really needed for blues. I use it since it's already there but if someone asks me to come to e blues jam I bring a couple of guitars, my Super Reverb, volume pedal and the Marshall Bluesbreaker, which might or might not get used.

The main thing is a tube amp loud enough to get that gritty sound a tube amp gets once the volume knob gets to around 6 or 7 or so. That's where the overdrive pedal comes in handy, it will let you get really close to that same sound at lower volume levels.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#24
I don't have a soul, what can I do?
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#25
Quote by Paleo Pete
Albert King played Teles...

Albert King played Flying Vs primarily. Do you mean Albert Collins?

Enough with the details, Teles make for excellent blues guitars. In my arbitrary and subjective order, I'd make up a hierarchy that goes (1) how you play, (2) amplifier, (3) guitar, (3) and (4) pedals, etc. from most to least influential in your tone. You just have to experiment in changing the variables to see what part of your tone you want to change (i.e. play different guitars on the same amp, different amps from the same guitar) to figure it out.
#26
aside from being SRV himself, playing skills is the biggest variable.

the biggest constant is the amp. about 70% percent of it. then the effects. then the guitar.

the catch is that the guitar can enable you to play more skillfully. thus, its more of a tool then a tonal variation. though effects have a large ffect on overall sound, i dont think they should enable or disable a genre as much as a guitar. i mean, playing a 7 string ibanez isnt the same as playing a tele.

after you have mastered these things above, change guitars to change timbre, skill, style, attidude etc.

but to answer your questions strictly related to gear which is based on genre, i would say amp first, and then guitar.
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#27
Unless you are going for a specific affected tone then pedals are the least of the three. If you know your gear well enough you will know when you are close and when you are way off.

You are a big fan of Dimebag and love his tone but you are going to have some trouble getting that on your Gretsch White Falcon.

Your friend loves Chet Atkins and for the life of him can't get that signature tone on his Schecter Hellraiser.

Maybe if you swapped guitars you could get closer to that tone. They are not the specific guitars those artists used but we can see that they will probably get close to nailing that tone.

Same can be said for amps too. Trying to get the Slipknot tone on your Fender Super Reverb might be a tall order. Likewise getting that Dick Dale sound on your triple Rectifier might not work out so well. That said you can make up for some shortcomings in that area with pedals. Get the right distortion pedal you might be a little closer. Likewise get a good reverb pedal can help too.
#28
Certain guitars and amps respond differently the way you play. Playing hard and then soft is going to sound very different on a Strat than it will on a Les Paul. It will also sound different on an AC30 than it will on a Deluxe Reverb. All of those sound good for blues but great blues players sound great because their gear compliments what they're playing and how they're playing it. Blues heavily relies on touch and you need gear that responds the way you need it to for the things that you're playing. If a lick doesn't sound that good, then don't play that lick. Play something different or find a way to play it so it sounds great.
#29
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
(a) I don't think it's any one thing, if we're just talking gear. All pieces of gear (whether it's pickups, wood of the guitar, amp, pedal, etc.) color the tone. So, you can't just point and go, "Try this pedal" or "Try that amp". Yes, trying said pedal or amp may get one closer to a certain tone. But it's not going to be exact. A pedal or an amp is a small part of the big picture.

(b) This is why tone chasing is so tedious and should never be attempted.


(a) I dunno. Some of those things are a pretty big part of the picture. As usual though it depends on what kit you already have (which makes these "what percentage of my tone does each part in the signal chain play?" type threads kind of pointless). If you already have, say, a 6505 and can't get a good metal tone out of it it's probably not the amp's fault, in that instance changing to a recto or something like that (while it's entirely possible to prefer the recto) isn't going to be a massive change. But if you have a fender twin then it's a much bigger difference.

(b) Again, it depends on what you mean by tonechasing. Using the previous example, if you have a twin i don't think trying to get your hands on a high gain amp is a problem. Granted, the TGP way of doing it where you're constantly chasing some kind of mythical holy grail type of tone and wasting tons of money buying very similar kit all the time is pretty silly (and I'm guessing that's what you mean when you say "tonechasing").

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#30
Quote by ken styles
Hey All,

This question below is just hypothetical....I was just thinking about it.

So lets say you have a certain guitar...let's say a Tele.

You hear some nice blues licks you want to try out.

The current guitar amp combo that you have doesn't have the flavor you would like to match those blues licks you heard. (might sound a little too thin, light, twangy, bango-ee...airy...etc.

So you look around and you see they have blues pedals.

then upon looking around some more you see they have "blues amps"

Do I really need both if I want the sweet velvet, slightly crunchy, raspy, soul voice sounds I am trying to achieve?

Or would I need another "blues guitar, (like a semi hollow archtop) + the blues driver pedal, + the blues amp????


In practice, your playing is going to be the biggest factor.

These days amps themselves don't necessarily enter into it all that much -- folks on records often play clean into the board and "reamp" or add electronic FX to it afterward, tweaking dials until they get what they want. Same thing is happening with a lot of live performances; some have a half-dozen small miked amps under the stage, some feed directly into a modeler and have a tech backstage pushing presets, etc.

I have 15 tube amps (and a couple of old solid state) but I mostly run modelers. I've got a whole library of FX, amps and cabinets on a couple of circuit boards, and that stuff runs out to a PA mixer or into a 1500W power amp and into a pair of wide-range speakers.
#31
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) I dunno. Some of those things are a pretty big part of the picture.

Well, I wasn't trying to assign how much of each and so on. But yeah.

As usual though it depends on what kit you already have (which makes these "what percentage of my tone does each part in the signal chain play?" type threads kind of pointless). If you already have, say, a 6505 and can't get a good metal tone out of it it's probably not the amp's fault, in that instance changing to a recto or something like that (while it's entirely possible to prefer the recto) isn't going to be a massive change. But if you have a fender twin then it's a much bigger difference.

Of course.

Granted, the TGP way of doing it where you're constantly chasing some kind of mythical holy grail type of tone and wasting tons of money buying very similar kit all the time is pretty silly (and I'm guessing that's what you mean when you say "tonechasing").

Yeah, I meant this kind of tonechasing. If you just want a general tone, like "blues guitar" or "metal guitar", then that's not bad.


#32
^ Yeah I figured that's what you meant. Just you need to watch how you phrase things, I've seen posts saying, "Dave_Mc said X" and I really meant "Y"
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#33
knowing how to get the most out of your gear is often more important than the gear itself. I play blues using a BC Rich Eagle and a Peavey Ultra amp. most would say that is a metal rig (which it does great) but as is the case with most guitars and amps can be very versatile.
#34
Quote by monwobobbo
knowing how to get the most out of your gear is often more important than the gear itself.

+3,1415

Knowing how to properly use the amps' EQs, for example, is one of the most important tools when you're trying to shape your tone to fit a specific purpose.
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#35
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ Yeah I figured that's what you meant. Just you need to watch how you phrase things, I've seen posts saying, "Dave_Mc said X" and I really meant "Y"

Yeah, same.

You'd be amazed how often that happens in "serious" discussions (like racism or major news events) in the Pit. Of course, since it's the Pit, you never can tell if it's that person genuinely misunderstanding or if they're just being an ass.

Quote by monwobobbo
knowing how to get the most out of your gear is often more important than the gear itself. I play blues using a BC Rich Eagle and a Peavey Ultra amp. most would say that is a metal rig (which it does great) but as is the case with most guitars and amps can be very versatile.

Yeah, this is key. Amp designers aren't dumb. They realize that being able to play several different genres on a single amp makes their amp more sellable. The key for a guitar player is to learn how to maximize on that versatility.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 19, 2014,
#36
*sigh*

Can we separate this in to "gear tone" and "hand tone"?

Gear tone affects the type of tone you're going to get: EQ, gain, american/british voicing, so on and so forth.

Hands affect the quality of that tone. We've all heard someone playing a £2000 Les Paul through a top-end Marshall with weak playing that sounds like crap. That player is going to sound bad through anything because they are bad. That doesn't mean that a good player is going to make a Marshall MG sound like a vintage plexi, it's a subtractive quality more than being able to compensate for a shitty set up.
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#37
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Yeah, same.

You'd be amazed how often that happens in "serious" discussions (like racism or major news events) in the Pit. Of course, since it's the Pit, you never can tell if it's that person genuinely misunderstanding or if they're just being an ass.


Ass.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#38
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
*sigh*

Can we separate this in to "gear tone" and "hand tone"?

Gear tone affects the type of tone you're going to get: EQ, gain, american/british voicing, so on and so forth..

Yes, that would be ideal. Right now it just feels like such a silly conversation. Can you imagine an analogous conversation on, say, a cooking forum? It would be absurd.

New Guy: Hi, I'm learning to make pizza. Can I make a meat lover's pizza without pepperoni? What should go on a meaty pizza?
Other guy: The crust is the most important part of pizza! You have to knead the dough right or your pizza will be shitty! Go practice kneading the dough!
New Guy: Ok, but I was asking about toppings. What are some common meats you guys use?
Other guy: KNEADING IS ABOUT USING YOUR HANDS, YOUR PIZZA WILL ALWAYS TASTE LIKE YOUR PIZZA IF YOU KNEAD THE DOUGH WITH YOUR HANDS. ERIC CLAPTON MAKES PIZZA AND IT ALWAYS TASTES LIKE ERIC CLAPTON'S PIZZA REGARDLESS OF WHAT TOPPINGS ARE ON IT
#39
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, that would be ideal. Right now it just feels like such a silly conversation. Can you imagine an analogous conversation on, say, a cooking forum? It would be absurd.

New Guy: Hi, I'm learning to make pizza. Can I make a meat lover's pizza without pepperoni? What should go on a meaty pizza?
Other guy: The crust is the most important part of pizza! You have to knead the dough right or your pizza will be shitty! Go practice kneading the dough!
New Guy: Ok, but I was asking about toppings. What are some common meats you guys use?
Other guy: KNEADING IS ABOUT USING YOUR HANDS, YOUR PIZZA WILL ALWAYS TASTE LIKE YOUR PIZZA IF YOU KNEAD THE DOUGH WITH YOUR HANDS. ERIC CLAPTON MAKES PIZZA AND IT ALWAYS TASTES LIKE ERIC CLAPTON'S PIZZA REGARDLESS OF WHAT TOPPINGS ARE ON IT



No but you see in this situation dough is just like tone! It's in the fingers! In fact I get my tone because I don't wash my hands regularly. Same way I make my dough! FINGERS MAN THEY MAKE MY CLEAN TWIN SOUND LIKE AN ENGL YOUR GEAR DOESN'T MATTER LOL.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
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