#1
Is everything played in songs are chords? For example metal songs or deathcore songs too they use chords or in solos?
#2
Chords are harmony, single note runs are melody. But they tie in together because they fall into one "key." A chord sounds good because it uses a set of notes that are relative to each other in a certain way, but they are all played at one time. If you take those notes out of the chord, re-arrange them, repeat a few of them, and add in a note or two that are not from the original chord, and then play it one note at a time, you'll have a melody that will sound nice when played on top of the original chord. When you randomly grab notes out of a scale and try to write a riff with them, many times you'll get garbage. But when you understand chords and chord progressions, you can write riffs full of notes that seem to "belong" together.

So even though you may hear a badass riff full of single notes, there is likely a chord that the riff is "derived" from.

Ultimately, just do what sounds good, and with time, your ear will develop and you will "understand" chords without actually knowing any technical information about them. But it will always be useful to learn a little bit of theory.
Last edited by Sample246 at Sep 17, 2014,
#3
Quote by matiss.gutans
Is everything played in songs are chords? For example metal songs or deathcore songs too they use chords or in solos?

Both, you'll be hard to find a song that DOESN'T use a chord of some form at some point whether it be a open chord/barre chord or power chord (you could also argue that arppegiated riffs are chords as well)

If you're finding chords tricky, thats a good thing, doing things that you find hard will improve you as a guitarist
#4
Every song that has pitches is based on what chords are being played. Even if you can't hear the chords, they're being implied by with the melody.

For example a guitarist plays the notes G, B, D, and an F, the chord being implied behind it is a G7.
#5
Quote by matiss.gutans
Is everything played in songs are chords? For example metal songs or deathcore songs too they use chords or in solos?


Western music is based in keys and scales. Western music is Diatonic, in that there are 8 notes in the basic scale/key.

Chords are formed on each note of the scale, from the notes in the key.

So, a key is based on a series of intervals. A major key's intervals are, (in semi-tones), 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1. Look at a piano, and have someone explain, what the white keys are, and what the black keys are. Then have them show you a scale or five.

So, we take our interval pattern, and superimpose notes over top of it.

The key of C major is the simplest, with all natural notes.

C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C.

Each one of those notes, names a chord in the key. Some are major, some are minor, one is diminished.

The chords in C major are: C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, B. diminished.

So learn basic theory. Basically, you can form a chord not only with a single instrument, but across several, and a voice. Singers forms chords in choral arrangements, even in pop background singing.

Suppose the bass plays a G note, the guitar a B, and the singer hits a D. You have a G major chord across three instruments, yet each only hits a single note.

We've been brought up with tonal music, and the harmonies, (chords), are almost genetically imprinted on us. Chord changes, or "progressions", can be relatively standardized as well. You find, "I, IV, V" over and over in pop music. Those are the chords based on the 1st, 4th, and 5th notes of any major scale.

Other forms of music, such as modal, Indian, and other exotic scales, may use drones instead of triad type chords.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 18, 2014,
#6
Most popular music today revolves around chords as a basis for song structure. Pop, rock, and other generic names use chords.

Some forms of music do not revolve around chords, at least not in the same way that popular music does. These forms might sound chaotic or non-sensical. Think horror-scapes or even some free-form Jazz.