#1
Hi! just wondering how to clean up my guitar the right way. The neck is a little sticky and the strings are dirty. Is their any special product?
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#2
For the strings I always use fast fret by GHS products, it's great.
#3
I recommend Gerlitz spray cleaner, honey fretboard oil and Gerlitz Carnauba Guitar wax.

They work really well and make the guitar smell and look shiny clean.

I tried Dr. Ducks Ax Wax (which is really an oil), and really didn't like the oily film it left.
#4
I use the Dunlop Formula 65 Clean & Polish. Works great and lasts forever. Bought one bottle of that, and one bottle of Dunlop Formula 65 Lemon Oil probably 7 years ago, and while I use it on well over 20 guitars now and then, they are both still half-full (or half-empty, if you're a pessimist).
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#5
I use duck wax, seems to do a good job. Over the last couple of years I've gotten into the habit of wiping down my strings and fretboard after each use. Quick and easy, I highly recommend developing that habit.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#6
I agree with the Dunlo 65/lemon oil combo. Very good products that last forver. have been using them for a couple of years now and no regrets. As for the strings GHS fast fret is pretty good.
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#8
Quote by HomerSGR
I use the Dunlop Formula 65 Clean & Polish. Works great and lasts forever. Bought one bottle of that, and one bottle of Dunlop Formula 65 Lemon Oil probably 7 years ago, and while I use it on well over 20 guitars now and then, they are both still half-full (or half-empty, if you're a pessimist).


This^

Make sure you glob that lemon oil on the neck, and let it sit until it's mostly evaporated (5-10mins); Then all the gunk just wipes off, and she'll feel as good as new!

Also, don't forget to lube your nut, and bridge every couple of sting changes. It helps to avoid that annoying dramatic change every time you touch a tuning peg. I like to use Big Ben's "Nut Sauce" because its super easy to apply, and the syringe helps to avoid making a mess. There are other options tho.
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#9
I too have been using Dunlop Fretboard 65 Ultimate Lemon Oil on my rosewood fretboards for the past 7 years, and the bottle is almost full.
I'm happy with the results, it seems to clean and condition the fretboards pretty effectively.

A little warning, though: if your guitar has a maple fretboard, don't use lemon oil. Simply using a damp cloth will do the job.
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#10
Quote by red.guitar
This^

Make sure you glob that lemon oil on the neck, and let it sit until it's mostly evaporated (5-10mins); Then all the gunk just wipes off, and she'll feel as good as new!


This is pretty much what you do NOT want to do, leastways on the fretboard. Back of the neck, do what you like.

If you've got a lot of gunk on your fretboard, you can use naptha (ronsonol lighter fluid or regular naptha, available in hardware stores) to clean it. Naptha is about the only solvent that won't harm nitrocellulose (Gibson) finishes. Mineral oil (lemon oil is mineral oil with some solvents added, Fast Fret is spray-on mineral oil, etc.) is dirt cheap and available anywhere. But it should only be put on your fretboard very lightly. It should not be allowed to soak in. And it should be wiped off within a minute or two.
#11
In general, any kind of mineral oil is just fine for your fretboard. Mineral oil costs about $11 per gallon. Fret Doctor costs about that per ounce. At around 128 ounces per gallon, you can see what he's making off you if you buy that stuff. It doesn't actually work any better, but if you like it, it works fine.

Carnauba wax is excellent for the rest of the guitar, including finish and metal bits. The one-pound tin of Johnson's Paste Wax will last you forever. Or you can spend a lot more for a lot less and by the Dunlop 65 Carnauba Cream in a tiny bottle. That works just fine, too. Be wary of using cleaner waxes that have abrasives in them, but something like Meguiars Cleaner Wax in the Burgundy bottle is fine. Stay away from silicon-based waxes; makes repairs difficult should you need them.

Plain old mineral oil, naptha and paste wax will keep your guitars in great shape for 150 years or so. Or you can fill up the college funds of the folks who put it in tiny bottles for you.
#12
I have a maple neck and fretboard
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#13
Outta curiousity, anyone know of a way to make a poly finish fade/wear/relic? I love my Mustang, the only thing that bugs me is the bright, shiny, mint finish. I also have an old, mystery finished lp special copy that's naturally relic'ing under my hands. It already has a very slick, relic'd look to it but I wouldn't mind nudging it a lil. Basically, I wanna cheat without sandpaper. I had the idea of trying to kinda "sun bleach" the Mustang, but I'm not so sure how effective that would be or if it would damage the fretboard or some other unintended consequence.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#14
Quote by Fret Frier
I have a maple neck and fretboard

Then simply use a slightly damp cloth to clean the fretboard when you change strings, it should be enough.

As far as the strings go, I suggest you wipe them with a dry cloth after playing, every time. That's what I do and they always feel clean.
Squier "VMC" Stratocaster
PRS SE Singlecut
tc electronic polytune
CMAT MODS Signa Drive
Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina
DIY gaussmarkov Dr. Boogey
EHX Small Clone
Mooer ShimVerb
DIY Beavis Devolt
T-REX Fuel Tank Chameleon
Ampeg GVT52-112
Last edited by Linkerman at Sep 22, 2014,
#15
Quote by lucky1978
Outta curiousity, anyone know of a way to make a poly finish fade/wear/relic? I love my Mustang, the only thing that bugs me is the bright, shiny, mint finish.


There are a number (hundreds) of different kinds of "poly" finish. Only guitar players lump them all together. A few discolor over time, but the newest don't. Remember that guitar paint is automotive paint, and that nitrocellulose lacquer was dumped by the auto industry sixty years ago because it faded, chalked, checked, discolored, cracked, etc.

There's also this: while there's a certain group of people who think the faded/worn/relic'd finishes are cool, remember that it's basically just a fashion statement, and that like all fashion trends, it'll be out of fashion soon enough and you'll simply have a guitar that looks like it wasn't cared for. Moreover, it narrows your audience when it comes time to sell the thing, likely reducing your resale value.

And finally, the modern finishes are designed to be tough, long-lasting stuff. Simply putting the guitar out in the sun, etc., is going to go further along in loosening frets and damaging components than it is in making it fit for a poseur. You're going to have to attack it with sandpaper, tools, keys, acids, etc.