#1
I bought a strat off of CL a little while ago ,and a new pair of strings came with it. (Super Slinkys in a pink package. I think they were 9s. After going to my lesson my teacher said that I need strings that are 10-46s. He recommended some fender ones that are made of pure nickel. He said that they are much easier on the frets. Is this a good move?
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#2
Nickel wrap strings are slightly easier on the frets, but I wouldn't suggest using them just because of that. If you like the sound and feel, sure, but I wouldn't use them thinking that you won't ever need a refret.

Strings are cheap, try a set and see if they work for you.
#3
I'm not going to get those just for that reason... I'm not sure how they sound or feel. Do you have a certain kind that you would recommend?
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#4
Not sure how that would help you, honestly. I could recommend shoes for you but if you don't use the size and type that I wear, it won't matter. Same with strings.

Try a bunch of the popular stuff - D'Addario, Ernie Ball, DR, whatever is on the wall at your local store. Try a new brand every time you change strings for a few months and see what works for you. Don't be surprised if you don't notice a big difference right away. Concentrate on your learning first, strings are just a minor personal preference thing and you'll find ones you like eventually.
#5
The pink package Ernie Ball are 9-42, yes.

Why did he tell you that you need 10-46? It sounds like complete nonsense to me. You don't "need" a particular gauge of strings.

9-42 is standard on 25,5'' scale length guitars (Strat, Tele, etc.), and 10-46 is standard on 24,75'' (Les Paul, SG etc.). Many players definitely use other gauges, but 9-42 is perfectly fine on a Strat if you like the feel of it.

If you're going to 10s you will need a setup, Strat bridges aren't like a hardtail. The bridge will be raised from the body due to the added string tension. It will be some hassle switching string gauges, but if you don't like what you have and are set on trying out different ones, by all means do it.
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#6
Try out the Ernie Ball. I used those for years before I switched to an even lighter set (still Ernie ball. Weird gauges lol)

I would go ahead and give it a setup if you know how or have a tech do it (since you bought it on CL and who knows how it was setup).

As mentioned, changing the gauge or tuning will require it to be intonated.

The whole thing that your teacher fed you is bull. You use what's comfortable. If you feel like you're playing with silly string, it might be time to try a thicker gauge. If you can't bend a step up, it might be time to try a lighter gauge. The whole idea is to make music, not to sound cool at GC when you're talking about how you use .13-.56s on your guitar (yeah, the guy at the counter tells me that every time I buy strings... shoot me now...)
#7
Quote by Fret Frier
I bought a strat off of CL a little while ago ,and a new pair of strings came with it. (Super Slinkys in a pink package. I think they were 9s. After going to my lesson my teacher said that I need strings that are 10-46s. He recommended some fender ones that are made of pure nickel. He said that they are much easier on the frets. Is this a good move?


Nah -- I usually run 9's on strat-scale guitars (single exception is the JTV-89F Variax). Ignore teacher recommendations on strings. Use what you like.
#8
I'm not arguing over what gauge, I agree. I didn't know a new setup would be required just to get new gauges.
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#9
Quote by Fret Frier
I'm not arguing over what gauge, I agree. I didn't know a new setup would be required just to get new gauges.


Yeah, it doesn't matter much for the plain strings made of the same material (as long as the pitch you're tuning them to isn't changing), but the material, core, and thickness of a wound string can have an effect on intonation.

I'm not 100% on the science of it (that's what the internet is for, right?), but I do know that the core of wound strings varies and the amount of tension needed to tune it to pitch will change (something to do with mass, stress, etc), and when you're changing those two factors, you're looking at re-intonation.

Not to mention increasing string gauge will put more stress on the neck, making a truss rod adjustment necessary. Lowering the gauge will have the opposite effect, of course.

Sorry, I can't give you a better explanation but it's true. I think a quick internet search can give you the info you need if you're interested
Last edited by mjones1992 at Sep 18, 2014,
#10
Setup needs really depends on how much tolerance you personally have for variations that will come with changing gauge, the neck relief may not need to be adjusted, and intonation needs to be adjusted only if you hear something is wrong or you're going to use the guitar for recording. But as I said, the tremolo bridge will be raised from the body if tension is increased, which isn't ideal for different reasons, one being that the action will be much higher.

What is absolutely clear is that a Strat due to the bridge is more sensitive when changing string gauges or tunings.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#12
I'm probably going to get super Slinkys in 10-46s. My strat actually has a floating trem. Does that make any difference?
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#13
Quote by Fret Frier
I'm probably going to get super Slinkys in 10-46s. My strat actually has a floating trem. Does that make any difference?


Yeah, with the floating trem, you'll need a slight adjustment to make the change to a 10-46 set. I'd want that adjustment done anyway, on a guitar bought on cl. If you don't know how to do it yourself, take it to a guitar store, and just tell them to set it up for 10s. It'll be a quick, cheap job.
#14
Quote by HomerSGR


What is absolutely clear is that a Strat due to the bridge is more sensitive when changing string gauges or tunings.


Right. One little thing and it's all girl-weepy.

Leastways the Swedish Strats are.
Here in the US, not so much.
#16
To address the real issue: If your teacher is preaching string choices to you as anything other than preference, you might want to look into getting a new teacher that's not trying to sound like a know it all and is a bit more invested in your progression as a player.
#17
Try the pure nickel strings. I started using them recently and now I've permanently converted. I think they sound a lot better than the nickel wound. They're warmer and they feel more responsive to your touch. Ernie Ball makes some pure nickel strings. They're called Rock N Roll.
#18
your teacher shouldn't be telling you what strings to buy, he doesn't have your hands, he doesn't play your guitar. he could suggest, but there really is no reason.

personally i use .11-49 D'addario Nickel Blues. work great for me on 25.5" and 24.75" i buy them in bulk. thats the best way to do it..

but try what is out there. try different brands and see what you like.
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#19
Quote by Fret Frier
I bought a strat off of CL a little while ago ,and a new pair of strings came with it. (Super Slinkys in a pink package. I think they were 9s. After going to my lesson my teacher said that I need strings that are 10-46s. He recommended some fender ones that are made of pure nickel. He said that they are much easier on the frets. Is this a good move?
.010 to .046 are, "electric regular". Personally, they're all I use on my only electric guitar.

For me, since I usually play acoustics, that set helps me avoid accidentally bending strings, as I'm used to a lot more tension than electric light, (.009 to .042) would provide.

My Ibanez ART-100 came with .009s on it,and I couldn't wait to get rid of them. I stuffed .010s on it, then cranked the pickups down, a move which might cause eyebrows to raise in some circles. The Ibby is a 24.75" (Les Paul) scale length.

I find the heavier strings help me create better clean sounds, and not load up the guitar when strumming.

Arguably, if you're going to play with gain, and do a lot of bending or "shredding", the .009 strings might be the better choice.

As far as wearing out frets goes, stainless steel frets are becoming the replacements of choice nowadays, as they tolerate harder alloys in the strings, than do the standard nickel-silver frets, which are most often the OEM fretting material.

My guitar teacher kept two electrics. One had 0.10s on it, the other carried .009s. It was for, "when I wanted to bend a few strings". The .010 set, will also help you to build better hand strength, which you might handy should you pick up an acoustic from time to time.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 19, 2014,
#20
Maybe I need to rephrase the whole thing about my teacher. Those are what he recommended. He says he likes nickel 10-46s on his strat, and steel 9s on his Les Paul. I also feel like the strings are a bit small. So what are the main differences in Nickel and Steel?
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai
#21
I put a set of 10-52 on my strat, up from 9-42, and I checked the neck relief and it was fine... Depends on the guitar maybe...
#22
Some people like .9's others likes .10's (normal)...

I always liked .11's

Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#23
I used to play 9-42. Then I got a resonator and the string gauge was much higher. Once I got used to it the 9-42 felt like warm spaghettis! :-D
#24
Quote by OliveG
I used to play 9-42. Then I got a resonator and the string gauge was much higher. Once I got used to it the 9-42 felt like warm spaghettis! :-D


You're probably a lead guitarist, not like me. You see, I'm much simpler, I only play rhythm with no capability of ever reaching lead.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#25
No, not really. Just a bedroom guitarist. But I do try to learn some solos...
#26
Quote by OliveG
I put a set of 10-52 on my strat, up from 9-42, and I checked the neck relief and it was fine... Depends on the guitar maybe...
There's almost no reason it wouldn't be. Going up in gauge, increases tension. So, you would either have the same amount of relief, or a touch more. That's nothing that would cause problems. But, going from heavy to light, might cause the neck to flex backwards, creating the situation of either no relief, (which can sometimes work), or a positive bend in the neck. Or if you'd prefer to think of it a "positive relief". In any case, a big pain in the "buzz"...

Although, the heavier strings might tend to raise the action overall. That would result in the need for a saddle adjustment, more so than the truss rod.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 20, 2014,
#27
Quote by Fret Frier
Maybe I need to rephrase the whole thing about my teacher. Those are what he recommended. He says he likes nickel 10-46s on his strat, and steel 9s on his Les Paul. I also feel like the strings are a bit small. So what are the main differences in Nickel and Steel?
Once you settle on what is going to be your prime concern, the gauge of the string set, you get into the question of tonality, sustain, longevity, output, and a whole lot more crap brought to you courtesy of the string makers and their advertising departments.

These are going to be personal choices, brought about by experimentation.

All to often, these discussions deteriorate into, "I use XXX strings, they're the best there is, so you should use them too".

But really, who knows? It could also come to pass that those, "best strings ever", could also be the "best strings ever" for you as well...

String materials interact with the wood in the guitar, the pickup system, in turn, affecting the signal sent to the FX and amp/cabinet combination.

At the end of the day, you should be changing alloys, (not sizes), with some meaningful intent. "I want more top end", or, "I want more output", "I want a different tone", and goals along those lines.

The best string set for you, and YOUR Strat, may be entirely different from the kid across the street and his humbucker equipped Les Paul.

So, take specificic recommendations with a grain of salt, and make choices in coincidence with your personal taste. And absolutely yes, it will require some time and experimentation.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 20, 2014,
#28
I have 2 guitars... ( an old bullet and the MIM) I'm probably going to move up to 10-46s. Put super slinkies on one, Pure nickel on the other
"Sometimes you have to go insane, to out sane the sane"- Mortecai