#1
I just started playing yesterday when it showed up. My only issue is it hurts so much. I feel the only way for me to handle the pain is to become an evil sadist from the 7th layer of hell who enjoys the feeling of pain.

Can you tell me why it hurts so much? Will my fingers adjust? Thanks a bunch.
#2
yeah it'll get better

if it hurt as much as that forever do you think wusses like me would still do it?
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#3
It depends. Is the pain like soreness from playing so much, or does it come your technique? If it's just soreness, then you will eventually adjust. If it's the latter, then you need to look at your technique and adjust it so that you don't get pain.
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#4
guitar is a comparatively primitive instrument, but you'll get used to it
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#5
Quote by SexyBeast810
It depends. Is the pain like soreness from playing so much, or does it come your technique? If it's just soreness, then you will eventually adjust. If it's the latter, then you need to look at your technique and adjust it so that you don't get pain.


that too
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by ianhulett
I just started playing yesterday when it showed up. My only issue is it hurts so much. I feel the only way for me to handle the pain is to become an evil sadist from the 7th layer of hell who enjoys the feeling of pain.

Can you tell me why it hurts so much? Will my fingers adjust? Thanks a bunch.


1. You are pressing too hard - you will learn to only press as hard as is necessary
2. Your guitar's action is probably too high - it is adjustable
3. Your finger tips will harden
4. Your fingers and thumb will get stronger
5. The pain will lessen
6. If you are hurting too much, stop
7. If your shoulder / neck / back is hurting your posture is wrong
#7
It's gonna be uncomfortable and maybe a little painful at first if you overdo it but like PSimson said; the first thing you want to do is check the action on the guitar. If that's too high, it's gonna be real painful and difficult to play and a lot of new guitars come with high action at the bridge, nut or both. Do some research on it or else take it to a tech to have the action set properly. You basically want it as low as possible without much buzzing which can vary depending on how good the fret job is on the guitar.

Since you're a beginner, it's tough to say whether you're pain is just the normal pain for a beginner or if it's from high action; or most likely both. I've been playing for 9 months, usually about an hour a day and more on weekends. My finger tips are calloused and permanently numb(slightly) but you get used to it. They still get sore when a play for several hours.
#9
Don't cha just hate it when poop like that happens? Ya pick up the guitar, with paranoid delusions of Van Halen-hood with rock stardom, as your much sooner than later goal , and the next thing you know, you can't get do-re-mi out, without giving yourself blisters...

Oh well, it happens to prince and pauper alike.

Make sure you guitar is setup properly, which is an absolute must.

You might give lighter strings a go until you develop callouses. But the bottom line is, it's gonna hurt until you get used to it.

As long as the pain you're feeling is in your fingertips, you're good to go. It's to be expected. My fingertips still turn black and get grooved, and I've been playing for a few decades. If you wrist or something else is hurting, you might need a clinic on technique.

Still no joy,? there's always the piano. BTW, an acoustic piano is one of the most beautiful sounding instruments of all time. (IMHO, of course).
#10
you don't mention what part of you hurts. assuming it's your fingertips, it does take some time to develop callouses, and then you'll be good to go. also, as mentioned, having your guitar set up will help a lot.

if you have pain elsewhere, it could be a matter of improper technique or position, and is something you can and should address.
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#11
In addition to what the other folks have said.......Grit your teeth, take the instrument to a good shop, and have the nice technician examine it to see if the action needs to be adjusted. If so, pop for the 50-ish bucks it will take for a proper set-up.
Your fingers will thank you.
We have written about this dozens of times. I was spared early on, when I started playing a cheap little Yamaha way back around '75. Boy, it was painful. But I always read a lot when I take up a new activity and sure enough the books were mentioning action adjustments.
So I hauled the little guy up the street to our local repair guy and when he gave it back it was vastly easier to play....
#12
Don't feel bad OP, I had to adjust when I got my new acoustic as well after taking a break from playing for several years. After a few weeks, your fingertips will harden and not only will it not hurt, it won't even become a thought =P

Wait until you start hitting up barre chords lol. That's still causing my hand/wrist some discomfort, but eventually (if your posture is right!) it will lighten up and your fingers/hand/wrist will strengthen.

There's also some exercises you can do to stretch out your hand that might help. Look to youtube for that =P

Happy playing!
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#13
I've been playing 9 months. My fingertips are calloused and grooved and guess what? They still get sore. I have the action set low on all my guitars and they are comfortable to play but sore fingertips is just part of the fun.
#14
I play guitar regularly for almost six years and sometimes I feel also pain, but nothing compared to the first days, weeks and months, of course. The answer is: your fingers will actually adjust if you practice with constancy, since guitar forces your hands to unnatural positions, specially —as just sayed above— when it comes to barre chords.

My advice is to dedicate some minutes per day to fingering practice, and (very important) mind string tension, guitar calibration and other physical features that may be complicating your practice. The worst scenario —and a sure way to tendinitis— would be a bent bridge with over-tensed strings.

Beyond all that, moderate pain is a totally necessary and ineluctable step to habituate your fingers to the guitar.
In music, I plead for selective eclecticism.
#15
" I got my first six string, bought it at the five and dime, played it till my fingers bleed, it was the summer of 69" Now you know how Bryan Adams felt when he wrote the song. Go learn it.

Cheers.
#16
Quote by tuxs
" I got my first six string, bought it at the five and dime, played it till my fingers bleed, it was the summer of 69" Now you know how Bryan Adams felt when he wrote the song. Go learn it.

Cheers.
D, A, D, A, Bm, A, D, G, Bm, A, D, G, Bm, A Then there's a bridge, F, Bb, F, Bb, C, D..........Rinse & repeat, starting with D....

Every time I mention that song in a, "my fingeys hurt", thread, I catch holy hell for it. What's your secret for getting that to slide through? Wait I know, Teflon long johns. That's it, isn't it?

My fingers still hurt Tux, and I've been sucking at the guitar for almost 5 decades. Can help me? Or should I go listen to Bryan Adams complain. Misery loves company, you know....
#17
Yeah, you'll adjust eventually. I'm always apprehensive to suggest people to adjust their action, because it might not always be the problem. If I remember correctly, it only hurt for about two years, then it didn't hurt at all. My fingers bled a few times, sure, but it helped me develop finger strength to where it is now.
#18
Quote by chrismendiola
Yeah, you'll adjust eventually. I'm always apprehensive to suggest people to adjust their action, because it might not always be the problem. If I remember correctly, it only hurt for about two years, then it didn't hurt at all. My fingers bled a few times, sure, but it helped me develop finger strength to where it is now.
You could have just asked questions on the internet instead of going through all that agony...
#19
Gorilla Tips help: They cost between £4 - £9 depending on your fret finger size and available from Amazon. Just make sure you buy the right size tho, as they can tear if you try forcing them on.
#20
Assuming it's your fingertips or even finger muscles, all I can say is that just like most other strenuous activities, (such as exercise) it will most certainly hurt. I started in January, and devoted a good bit of the first month or so to simply pressing down chords until my fingers hurt too much. Everyday. If there was a day where the soreness spanned to the next day, I'd skip a day. Then I would continue my callous-building on a day when they felt okay. When focusing solely on building callouses on my fingertips and not learning music, I was able to quickly build callouses enough for me to practice in some comfort. Then that practice further built the callouses, and now I can play away all day, everyday. I highly recommend specifically focusing on callous building.

Don't push yourself too hard.
"I think it's so cool that you can pick up the guitar and create something that didn't exist 5 minutes ago."
#21
As mentioned above, good action is mandatory, especially at the nut. Nothing wrong with a first timer starting on a nylon string (classic) guitar.
#22
Quote by ianhulett
I just started playing yesterday when it showed up. My only issue is it hurts so much. I feel the only way for me to handle the pain is to become an evil sadist from the 7th layer of hell who enjoys the feeling of pain.

Can you tell me why it hurts so much? Will my fingers adjust? Thanks a bunch.


Both the questions "Why does playing guitar hurt so friggin much?", and "Why is divorce so expensive?" have the same answer.


Because it's worth it.
#23
Quote by ghobby
Both the questions "Why does playing guitar hurt so friggin much?", and "Why is divorce so expensive?" have the same answer.


Because it's worth it.
Unfortunately, it also calls to the forefront the preemptive question, "why did you either get married, or take up playing guitar in the first place"?
#24
Quote by Captaincranky
Unfortunately, it also calls to the forefront the preemptive question, "why did you either get married, or take up playing guitar in the first place"?


Hindsight is always 20-20
#25
Before you develop muscle memory you'll most likely have a lot of tension in your left hand. You'll be pressing rather hard on the strings as you're still consciously trying to adjust your fingers as necessary.

Once you've got some muscle memory you'll find you can actually press quite lightly on the strings. You can test this by just plucking a single note. Continue plucking the note while releasing the pressure of the finger until it no longer rings. You'll find you actually don't need much pressure at all.

Lastly, if you buy a capo and shove it on the 2nd fret you should find it a bit easier to play as it lowers the action. But this may confuse a new player who still makes big use of the fret marks.