#1
So I've been looking to get myself a semi-hollow Gibson, I like the ES-335, but it's just so darn big. Then I picked up an ES-339 and it felt better but it just didn't look right, it was TOO small. So I've been looking online to find a size in between the two and all I've found so far is the Midtown, but it's not an arch top and I want an arched top.

So can anyone explain to me the different models of semi-hollow Gibsons and their size differences? I've tried Googling it and I just can't find a straight forward answer.
Gear:
-Mesa Dual Rectifier (3 Channel) with KT88 and KT66 Tubes
-Peavey 6505+
-Roland JC120
-Ibanez Tone Blaster TBX150H
-Mesa 4x12 Straight Cab
-Marshall 1960BV
-Gibson Les Paul Custom
-Gibson Flying V
-Line 6 M13
#2
I've tried es-335s and found them very comfortable. I'm 6'1. I guess it 's just a matter of taste... Does it have to be a Gibson? Ibanez make sound too , I think the AM series are the smaller ones (compared to the AS). Have you looked into those ? I haven't found any to try so far though...
#4
Quote by JustRooster
Sounds like you need a Hagstrom Viking.

I was thinking the Hagstrom Deuce Tremar:

http://www.hagstromguitars.eu/index.php?option=com_zoo&task=item&item_id=1891&category_id=56&Itemid=36
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Sep 19, 2014,
#5
The ES-335 set the standard for Gibson's semi-solid line of guitars, and still does. The ES339 and the more expensive version of it (ES359) were created specifically for players who wanted a smaller ES-series guitar. Why is there not more variation in the sizes of the ES-series guitars? Probably because Gibson has had such great success with the original design that they see no need to change it.

As others have suggested, if you want a semi-solid guitar that is somewhere between the size of the ES335 and the ES339, then you will have to look at the offerings from other makers. But do not despair; there are some very good ones out there.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#7
Quote by JustRooster
Sounds like you need a Hagstrom Viking.


How does the size of the Viking differ to the ES 335 / 339 size ?
#8
Quote by Ippon
CS 336, scaled down version of the 335!



Not really.....

The CS-336 delivers the classic look of the 335 with its elegantly tapered figured-top but the Custom Shop’s engineers have enhanced the CS-336’s playability. Although the CS-336 has the same body lines as the ES-335, the model is scaled down to provide solidbody style comfort. And its neck has the slim, "fast" profile of vintage ’60s Gibson guitars. To create truly great resonating properties, the back and sides of the CS-336 are a single piece of mahogany that is shaped inside and out like a classic Gibson archtop, but with a solid center beam running the length of the body from the neck tenon to the tail block. The model’s solid, two-piece maple top is also carved inside and out to the shape and thickness of ES-series archtops, but it, too, has a solid center section that matches up to the center beam of the body. And before each CS-336 leaves the Custom Shop it is checked and adjusted by one of Gibson’s state-of-the-art Pleck machines, ensuring the ultimate ready-to-play set-up.
#9
Quote by paruwi
How does the size of the Viking differ to the ES 335 / 339 size ?



Feels thinner, easier to get the arm over. It wears different than you would think by looking at the size specs compared to the 335.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#10
Quote by JustRooster
Feels thinner, easier to get the arm over. It wears different than you would think by looking at the size specs compared to the 335.


So no different size.....

Now you just can hope the OP 'feels' like you
#11
Quote by xXBansheeXx
So I've been looking to get myself a semi-hollow Gibson, I like the ES-335, but it's just so darn big. Then I picked up an ES-339 and it felt better but it just didn't look right, it was TOO small. So I've been looking online to find a size in between the two and all I've found so far is the Midtown, but it's not an arch top and I want an arched top.

So can anyone explain to me the different models of semi-hollow Gibsons and their size differences? I've tried Googling it and I just can't find a straight forward answer.



The ES 335 is 16" body width
the ES 339 is 14" body width
the CS 336 is 13" body width

I don't think Gibson actually has anything between 14 and 16"

You might have a look at the FGN Masterfield Semi-Hollows, they are 15"

FGN is FujiGenGakki Japan

http://shop.fgnguitars.com/shopping/new-in-guitars/masterfields-series/msa-hp-ch-2013-11-20-detail.html

#13
Quote by paruwi
Not really.....

The CS-336 delivers the classic look of the 335 with its elegantly tapered figured-top but the Custom Shop’s engineers have enhanced the CS-336’s playability. Although the CS-336 has the same body lines as the ES-335, the model is scaled down to provide solidbody style comfort.


Wait -- you replied to someone who said that the 336 is a scaled down 335, said "Not really..." and then backed it up with some Gibson advertising blurb that says that the 336 is a scaled-down 335. WHAT?

The OP's issue is not with the construction method but with the actual size of the body on the scaled down guitars. The 335 is too big, the 336/339 is too small. Can you help Goldilocks out?
#14
Quote by xXBansheeXx
So I've been looking to get myself a semi-hollow Gibson, I like the ES-335, but it's just so darn big.
So can anyone explain to me the different models of semi-hollow Gibsons and their size differences? I've tried Googling it and I just can't find a straight forward answer.


The Midtown is about 15" in width. It's not archtop, but if 16" is too wide and 14" is too small, that's what you're left with.

I don't think the Midtowns are great quality guitars (in general), but your perception may be different. I have a pair of 335s (you get comfortable with the size) and I have an Ibanez AM205 from the early '80's that's actually what Gibson copied to get to the 339. It's about 14" across, and it's probably still the best of that size guitar.
#15
Quote by dspellman
Wait -- you replied to someone who said that the 336 is a scaled down 335, said "Not really..." and then backed it up with some Gibson advertising blurb that says that the 336 is a scaled-down 335. WHAT?

The OP's issue is not with the construction method but with the actual size of the body on the scaled down guitars. The 335 is too big, the 336/339 is too small. Can you help Goldilocks out?


Wait,
you snipped the underlined part of my response to make your reply look good......

Not really.....

The CS-336 delivers the classic look of the 335 with its elegantly tapered figured-top but the Custom Shop’s engineers have enhanced the CS-336’s playability. Although the CS-336 has the same body lines as the ES-335, the model is scaled down to provide solidbody style comfort. And its neck has the slim, "fast" profile of vintage ’60s Gibson guitars. To create truly great resonating properties, the back and sides of the CS-336 are a single piece of mahogany that is shaped inside and out like a classic Gibson archtop, but with a solid center beam running the length of the body from the neck tenon to the tail block. The model’s solid, two-piece maple top is also carved inside and out to the shape and thickness of ES-series archtops, but it, too, has a solid center section that matches up to the center beam of the body. And before each CS-336 leaves the Custom Shop it is checked and adjusted by one of Gibson’s state-of-the-art Pleck machines, ensuring the ultimate ready-to-play set-up.
#16
Quote by dspellman
.........

The 335 is too big, the 336/339 is too small. Can you help Goldilocks out?


See post #11
#17
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
Quote by paruwi
Wait,
you snipped the underlined part of my response to make your reply look good......


I did indeed. Since, as explained, the method of construction wasn't in question, only the size. Gibson is copying other manufacturers here; Carvin has been producing semi-hollows using CNC machines far longer than Gibson has produced that guitar, and with a carved top (maple) as well. I would have recommended that guitar (its quality level is at least as good as the Gibson's with better woods and far more finish options available) if the size hadn't been a factor. Their semi hollows are available both as single cuts and double cuts and have a really nice smooth neck heel (particularly on the double cuts) as well as having MIDI capable versions available.



Neither the Midtown Customs NOR the ES-336 come close in quality level.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 20, 2014,
#21
Mmmmmmm...

A Carvin spalted SH 550 like that first picture has been on my wish list for some time, along with a Claro walnut one.

While you're here, dspellman, what about Agiles?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#22
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Mmmmmmm...

A Carvin spalted SH 550 like that first picture has been on my wish list for some time, along with a Claro walnut one.

While you're here, dspellman, what about Agiles?


I have no experience with the Agile semi-hollows. The guys who buy them that comment on them on the AGF forums are all gaga over them, but I've got no hands-on at all.

I've got the big-bodied hollowbody jazzboxes (Gibson and OLD pre-Gibson Epiphone), a couple of 335s, a semi-hollow double neck (Gibson made a few back in the late '50's before switching to the SG-style ones) and the smaller-size Ibanez AM-205.

The Carvins look bigger in photos, but I think they sound a lot closer to a chambered LP than to a 335. The Gibson 336 has the same characteristics. The Ibanez actually has more of a 335 about it than the small Gibsons (like the 339) or Epiphones do, and I think that's about as close to a missing link as can be had.

If I were buying another semi-hollow today, particularly one with a carved interior like the Carvins or the Gibson 336, I'd actually pick up Soloway Single 15. Perhaps the most comfortable guitar I've played. It's got a 15" lower bout, but there's a huge tummy cut in the back and a major forearm curve on the front. It almost cradles you. They are/were available in 24.75", 25.5" and 27" scales, and Jim tuned the 27" scale to standard. It produces gorgeous piano-like lows. I actually like both that one and the 25.5" version. You can get a nearly-flat 16" radius and a very wide (1 13/16ths" nut) neck that actually retains that extra eighth of an inch all the way to a slightly wider (custom-made) bridge. He originally designed that as a "fingerstyle" setup, but we both agree that it's one of the most comfortable necks we've ever played. My favorite had a spruce top; great sounding unplugged, gorgeous sounding plugged in.



This is much more of a player's guitar than a poser's guitar, though. The OP's post indicates that it's really about how the guitar *looks* on him, and that's why the smaller bodies don't appeal to him.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 21, 2014,