#1
Example if low E is tuned as high e they cant sound same right? because diffrent thickness of strings.
Bassicly frequency which is how many movements in a second there is makes note a certain octave and note?
What if i wanted to tune low E as note A.
#2
I'm not entirely sure how frequencies work: although a quick look at a frequency chart shows that each octave of E is ~doubled in frequency speed from the E below it. They will sound different because of this, although tonality they will be the same note. The timbre also effects the sound.

If you tuned to drop A your strings would loose a lot of their natural timbre unless you are using a really heavy gage of strings. But a low A and a high A would sound to the same tone.
#3
If you tuned your low E string to an A as you say, it would definitely not sound exactly the same since the thickness of the string will still change the tone quality of the note you hit

;It would literally be the exact same note but would not sound exactly the same
#4
the string will be vibrating at the same fundamental frequency that corresponds exactly to that A in that octave. but in the physical world, all sounds come with other harmonics that color the sound, so those will be slightly different in different string gauges. essentially the same reason for how you can play the same note on a different instrument and it won't sound the same.
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#5
Quote by matiss.gutans
Example if low E is tuned as high e they cant sound same right? because diffrent thickness of strings.
Bassicly frequency which is how many movements in a second there is makes note a certain octave and note?
What if i wanted to tune low E as note A.
You're assuming the the string ONLY produces the tuned frequency when plucked. That isn't so, and every note that you hit on the guitar, (or any other musical instrument), is rich in harmonic content. In fact, harmonics are what make a guitar sound like a guitar, a violin as a violin, etc.

Analyzing the overall harmonic content of different sources, and trying to recreate it using the computer, is what has led to our ability to "model" sounds, and hence modeling amplifiers and such.

A wound string would obviously produce a different harmonic emphasis, be possibly made of different materials. So no, a wound string would not sound like a plain string even if tuned to the same frequency.

To go one step further, even two strings of the same gauge, but DIFFERENT materials would sound perceptibly different. Which brings us to all the advertising blabber, "our strings sound better than their strings, because ours are made of different stuff"!

I hope that helps.