#1
So I have this cheap-ish Ibanez 12 string acoustic with a broken off headstock.





I know it could be repaired if the break was at more of an angle but it is almost a straight clean break. at least the fret board stayed intact! I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to possibly clamp this up (if possible at all.) Any help appreciated! Thanks!
#2
That looks like one that would require splines to reinforce it. I'm not any sort of repair expert though, but the few repair threads I've seen for breaks like that all seemed to involve putting in splines to reinforce the broken area.
#3
Yes, but depending on the value of the guitar it may not be worth it. Most breaks like that are between $500-$1000 to fix depending on the luthier fixing it.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#4
I would have a go at it as a DIY job:

1) Ensure that the broken parts mate up exactly.

2) Glue with slow setting epoxy, and clamp

3) Add splines. I would likely use a dremel to cut the spline channels. I'm not sure this would be necessary, so it would depend on how I felt about it when I got that far.

I would strip the finish off the back of the neck, sand it, and redo it with oil or the like to get it as neat as possible. - But I wouldn't expect to end up with an invisible repair, so would try and work the splines in neatly as a feature. Or alternatively hide the repair under stain or paint.
#6
perhaps drill holes in both pieces in the same place and then glue pegs in so that they interlock when you glue and clamp the pieces together?
#7
The first thing I would do is to get off UG and go consult someone with actual experience. Do not glue it yourself, if you do the glue will make any further attempt at repairs next to impossible, especially if you use epoxy which is not suited for an instrument repair.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#9
Quote by Explorerbuilder
I am surprised so many are thinking that is fixable. That is almost a clean break straight across the grain. It is usually only fixable if it breaks at an angle. There is nothing to glue it to or to hold it together.


The way I see it, the apparently-intact fretboard provides a good support at the front of the neck, and some strong material inlaid into the back across the break could provide support in that area.
#10
Thanks for all of the advice everyone. The guitar is not worth very much so if there is a chance of it being fixed, it will be a DIY job, as getting a professional to do it would probably cost more than the guitar's value. Its been in this condition for over a year now so its not going to be much of a loss to me if nothing can be done, I have fixed a couple of necks before but never something this extreme.
#11
I hate to be negative, but this honestly looks quite awful. You're going to end up with a butt joint between the two neck pieces, relying on the strength of glue alone to support the neck under tension. The glue joint between the fingerboard and neck won't do much for strength really. You'd get the best results if you had a scarfed break to work with.

I've never done this... I'm guessing the best way to fix it properly would be to steam the fingerboard off, remove the truss rod, cut both the neck and neckstock at a matching angle, then scarf a block between them to cover the space... plane it and route for the truss road... and put it all back together. The neck would be no different to lots of modern necks with accent splices.
#12
OK. Quick, down and dirty. Get these: Thin viscosity CA glue. Medium viscosity, also. Not the little tubes from walmart, go to a specialty wood shop, or a model airplane hobby shop. Get some fiberglass cloth like used for auto body repair.

Work the broken piece back into place. It has to mate back together perfectly. clamp or tape in place, but dont cover the break. Now prop the guitar so excess glue wont drip on anything as this stuff is as thin as water, and will ruin nice furniture. Apply the CA liberally to the break letting it soak up as much as it will take. Dont touch it! CA glues human flesh instantly!
Let that set over night to insure all the glue has set. Now, grind/sand a low area a couple inches wide, and about an 1/8th inch deep over the break. The deepest on the back of the neck. Cut several small pieces of glass cloth to cover the low area, and fill the depth. Stack them on plastic sheet like a ziplock bag, wet the cloth with med CA and press onto the neck, using the plastic to rub in down without your fingers sticking. It will likely get hot. The plastic should peel off after the glue has set. When this is then sanded down to the original shape, there is a fiberglass "spline" over the break. I have actually done this twice.
Last edited by Lenny Gee at Sep 23, 2014,
#13
Quote by Lenny Gee
OK. Quick, down and dirty. Get these: Thin viscosity CA glue. Medium viscosity, also. Not the little tubes from walmart, go to a specialty wood shop, or a model airplane hobby shop. Get some fiberglass cloth like used for auto body repair.

Work the broken piece back into place. It has to mate back together perfectly. clamp or tape in place, but dont cover the break. Now prop the guitar so excess glue wont drip on anything as this stuff is as thin as water, and will ruin nice furniture. Apply the CA liberally to the break letting it soak up as much as it will take. Dont touch it! CA glues human flesh instantly!
Let that set over night to insure all the glue has set. Now, grind/sand a low area a couple inches wide, and about an 1/8th inch deep over the break. The deepest on the back of the neck. Cut several small pieces of glass cloth to cover the low area, and fill the depth. Stack them on plastic sheet like a ziplock bag, wet the cloth with med CA and press onto the neck, using the plastic to rub in down without your fingers sticking. It will likely get hot. The plastic should peel off after the glue has set. When this is then sanded down to the original shape, there is a fiberglass "spline" over the break. I have actually done this twice.


I haven't done a broken headstock, but I have done a few other repairs that require a high strength joint, eg an instant neck reset. because I mostly only do it for myself, and not that often, I tend to err on the side of caution. Don't you worry about the CA setting before you're sure that the joint is properly in place? The reason I suggested slow-setting epoxy is becuase it gives you literally hours to get it right before it becomes irreversible.
#14
That is why it must be in place before glueing. The CA will wick into the joint. Epoxy is messy. You gotta do all the fiddly part of getting it back in place with it oozing out all over, just messy. I glued a tooth back in my denture with CA 2 years ago. The stuff is just amazing, if you learn how to use it.
#15
Quote by Lenny Gee
That is why it must be in place before glueing. The CA will wick into the joint. Epoxy is messy. You gotta do all the fiddly part of getting it back in place with it oozing out all over, just messy. I glued a tooth back in my denture with CA 2 years ago. The stuff is just amazing, if you learn how to use it.


Just to be clear, I would never attempt any kind of gluing of that kind without testing first that the parts will mate properly. - But there is always the risk that a small splinter might move or whatever and make life difficult.

Do those thicker CA glues wick the same as the thin one? Epoxy also good at wetting contact surfaces and wicking.
#16
The benefit of using the thin ca is that the parts are clamped in place before glueing. Any little splinter problem will be found before it is stuck together. No epoxy I have ever used would wick into a clamped joint. I have used all sorts of epoxies in a previous hobby, composite model aircraft. Me, with the last composite model I built. I know my glue's, you see, I am a "Gluru". Thick anything does not wick. I would use Titebond II before I bothered mixing epoxy, for this repair.
Last edited by Lenny Gee at Sep 24, 2014,
#17
Quote by Explorerbuilder
I am surprised so many are thinking that is fixable. That is almost a clean break straight across the grain. It is usually only fixable if it breaks at an angle. There is nothing to glue it to or to hold it together.

I gotta agree with this, it will be next to impossible to "butt" it together enough to get any strength at all....

Last time I had something like this to fix I basically took the fret board off, routed the neck out of the body and built a completely new neck, put old fretboard on and bam the guitar was better than it was before the break (well thats what the owner told me ... action was way lower than it use to be and it sounded so much better than before, thanks to using mahogany for the new neck)

Honestly it isn't an overly difficult thing to put a new neck on it if you are careful (and have a basic knowledge of building) ... I did the above without to much stress and I had never done anything with acoustics before