#1
Hi All,

My band used to have a few kick ass tracks. This is a redone version of one of our earlier tracks, TCBC.

Let me know what you think!

http://youtu.be/wMqCeQr_i9Q
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.

#2
Thanks for checking out my stuff!

First of all, I've listened to your other song you posted a few days ago. I don't know when you recorded this, but the quality on this song is much, much better. So cheers to that.

Your soloing skills are pretty solid. A nice, simple backing track with some good blues licks cutting above the mix. The only thing I'd change is to make the backing track a little more dynamic. In a good blues song, the lead guitar should cut above and announce "I am the LEAD!" (which you do well), but there should also be interplay between the foreground and the background. Like, at the end of every 8 measures (or 12 or 32 or whatever), you should join the rest of the band in a little turnaround riff, and then jump back into another solo.

Listen to Since I've Been Loving You by Led Zeppelin (yes, it's probably stolen). Page mostly solos through the whole song, but listen to that sad sounding short riff at 2:19 (which shows up a bunch of times in the song), when the band seems to come together before separating again. It gives the listener some time to breathe, before getting into the solo parts again. It's especially important if you're playing an instrumental. Just my opinion, but I obviously think way too hard about this stuff. I like to break genres down to figure out what separates the great songs from the okay songs.

Finally, your tone. Don't change a thing. That is among the sweetest blues tones I've ever heard. It's so sharp but not trebley, and the high and low notes are equally as clear. The distortion at the end works very well with it also. Most importantly (as I've mentioned), it wasn't clipping the audio.

Great job.
#3
Good guitar skills there and musical ideas in the lines. I like the delicate sounds and the way they're framed in the mix in the beginning. The more aggressive guitar that comes in around 3:00 is a good idea for adding intensity and variety as the arrangement develops. The solo guitar's phrasing in the beginning minute or so was stellar - expressive and natural sounding with breaths between bluesy phrases like you were channeling Robert Johnson's voice. That guitar tone was beautiful. And there were some nice moments later too but for me it got a bit run together after that, like you wanted to say so much you couldn't fit it all in. If I was producing this tune I'd make it shorter, leaving the first part much as it is but after that editing best phrases together with a bit of a breath between them.

Keep it up.